The Fictioning Horror Sale
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Original Essays | September 4, 2014

Edward E. Baptist: IMG The Two Bodies of The Half Has Never Been Told: Slavery and the Making of American Capitalism



My new book, The Half Has Never Been Told: Slavery and the Making of American Capitalism, is the story of two bodies. The first body was the new... Continue »
  1. $24.50 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

spacer

On Order

$50.25
New Hardcover
Currently out of stock.
Add to Wishlist
available for shipping or prepaid pickup only
Qty Store Section
- Local Warehouse World History- Ancient History

Reading and Writing in Babylon

by

Reading and Writing in Babylon Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Over 5,000 years ago, the history of humanity radically changed direction when writing was invented in Sumer, the southern part of present-day Iraq. For the next three millennia, kings, aristocrats, and slaves all made intensive use of cuneiform script to document everything from royal archives to family records.

In engaging style, Dominique Charpin shows how hundreds of thousands of clay tablets testify to the history of an ancient society that communicated broadly through letters to gods, insightful commentary, and sales receipts. He includes a number of passages, offered in translation, that allow readers an illuminating glimpse into the lives of Babylonians. Charpin's insightful overview discusses the methods and institutions used to teach reading and writing, the process of apprenticeship, the role of archives and libraries, and various types of literature, including epistolary exchanges and legal and religious writing.

The only book of its kind, Reading and Writing in Babylon introduces Mesopotamia as the birthplace of civilization, culture, and literature while addressing the technical side of writing and arguing for a much wider spread of literacy than is generally assumed. Charpin combines an intimate knowledge of cuneiform with a certain breadth of vision that allows this book to transcend a small circle of scholars. Though it will engage a broad general audience, this book also fills a critical academic gap and is certain to become the standard reference on the topic.

Review:

"This introduction to the birth of cuneiform writing in the Babylonian empire is an engaging primer on the lexicon of linguistics. Cuneiform writing, with its three dimensional requirement of light and shade, included 600 characters, all possessing either a syllabic (phonetic) or logographic value that showed both sound and meaning. It's all about communication: clay tablets were put in clay envelopes; to learn characters, students traced them; and scholars copied manuscripts to preserve them. Tablets of contracts, laws, and even literary works were archived and collected in libraries. Thus we have the Epic of Gilgamesh from the second millennium, telling us the story of the deluge. By the first millennium, it wasn't only scribes who could read and write but also administrators, generals, and even their wives. The fires of war baked the clay tablets, safeguarding them for future research (there is an inventory of 500,000 texts). Charpin has written a scholarly work of incredible breadth; read with reference books at the ready to discover an ancient world not so different from our own. (Nov.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright PWyxz LLC)

Synopsis:

Co-Winner, 2010 Translation Prize, Non-Fiction Category, French-American Foundation and Florence Gould Foundation

About the Author

Dominique Charpin is Professor of Mesopotamian History at the Sorbonne, Paris.

Eacute;tudes

Product Details

ISBN:
9780674049680
Author:
Charpin, Dominique
Publisher:
Harvard University Press
Translator:
Todd, Jane Marie
Author:
Todd, Jane Marie
Location:
Cambridge
Subject:
Ancient - General
Subject:
Alphabets & Writing Systems
Subject:
Linguistics - Historical & Comparative
Subject:
Iraq Civilization To 634.
Subject:
Cuneiform writing - History
Subject:
World History-Ancient History
Subject:
Language Arts & Disciplines : Alphabets & Writing Systems
Subject:
LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / Historical & Comparative
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Cloth
Publication Date:
20110103
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
46 halftones, 7 line illustrations, 1 ma
Pages:
336
Dimensions:
8 x 6 in

Other books you might like

  1. Beginnings of Civilization Used Mass Market $3.50
  2. The Babylonian Expedition of The... Used Trade Paper $17.50
  3. The Sumerians New Trade Paper $18.95
  4. Looking for Dilmun Used Mass Market $3.50

Related Subjects

Computers and Internet » Artificial Intelligence » Robotics
History and Social Science » Archaeology » Ancient Languages
History and Social Science » Archaeology » General
History and Social Science » Linguistics » English Linguistics and Dialects
History and Social Science » Western Civilization » General
History and Social Science » World History » Ancient History
History and Social Science » World History » General
History and Social Science » World History » Middle East
History and Social Science » World History » Western Civilization

Reading and Writing in Babylon New Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$50.25 Backorder
Product details 336 pages Harvard University Press - English 9780674049680 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "This introduction to the birth of cuneiform writing in the Babylonian empire is an engaging primer on the lexicon of linguistics. Cuneiform writing, with its three dimensional requirement of light and shade, included 600 characters, all possessing either a syllabic (phonetic) or logographic value that showed both sound and meaning. It's all about communication: clay tablets were put in clay envelopes; to learn characters, students traced them; and scholars copied manuscripts to preserve them. Tablets of contracts, laws, and even literary works were archived and collected in libraries. Thus we have the Epic of Gilgamesh from the second millennium, telling us the story of the deluge. By the first millennium, it wasn't only scribes who could read and write but also administrators, generals, and even their wives. The fires of war baked the clay tablets, safeguarding them for future research (there is an inventory of 500,000 texts). Charpin has written a scholarly work of incredible breadth; read with reference books at the ready to discover an ancient world not so different from our own. (Nov.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright PWyxz LLC)
"Synopsis" by , Co-Winner, 2010 Translation Prize, Non-Fiction Category, French-American Foundation and Florence Gould Foundation
spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.