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Our Underachieving Colleges: A Candid Look at How Much Students Learn and Why They Should Be Learning More

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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

"Derek Bok's Our Underachieving Colleges is readable, balanced, often wry, and wise. This book should be required reading for every curriculum committee and academic dean. As someone who has lived his whole life in the academy, Bok knows how to bring institutional practice in line with research on how students learn best. In a period when many other countries are working hard at improving undergraduate education, this book should serve as a spur to overcome the complacency that attends most discussions of American undergraduate education, especially in our leading institutions."--Mary Patterson McPherson, President Emeritus of Bryn Mawr College and Vice President of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

"A bookcase-worth of jeremiads, long on invective but short on evidence, decries the supposedly sorry state of undergraduate instruction. The Closing of the American Mind, Illiberal Education, The University in Ruins: the titles give the game away. In Our Underachieving Colleges, Derek Bok argues persuasively that, far from pinpointing a real crisis, these accounts are exercises in nostalgia, laments for an Edenic era that never existed. In jargon-free prose he makes accessible hitherto obscure studies on topics that range from students' satisfaction with their college experience to the efficacy of ethics courses. What's even more important, he draws on this research to advance useful and usable prescriptions for colleges that, while not doing badly, could do much better. For anyone with an open mind about the state of American higher education, Our Underachieving Colleges is indispensable reading."--David L. Kirp, Professor of Public Policy, University of California at Berkeley, author of Shakespeare, Einstein, and the Bottom Line: The Marketing of Higher Education

"Radical and conservative critics of undergraduate education have met their match in Derek Bok's new book. After carefully spelling out what the core purposes of undergraduate education should be--learning to communicate, learning to think critically, building good character, preparing for citizenship, living with diversity, preparing for a global society, developing breadth of interests, and preparing for a career--Our Underachieving Colleges explains why undergraduate education in America is not as good as it could be and offers suggestions for improvement. Trustees, academic administrators, and faculty across the nation should all read Our Underachieving Colleges because Bok holds them all responsible for the deficiencies of our undergraduate programs and assigns each an important role in the quest for improvement. Perhaps his most important message is that undergraduate education is more than what goes on in the classroom; every aspect of life and decision making in academia is involved."--Ronald G. Ehrenberg, Irving M. Ives Professor of Industrial and Labor Relations and Economics and Director of the Cornell Higher Education Research Institute (CHERI)

Book News Annotation:

Former president of Harvard U. and a longtime specialist and frequent author on higher education, Bok has written a lengthy and thoughtful excursus on the complex question of what colleges can and should teach. Including many concrete examples and situating the larger issues within their historical context, Bok discusses a wide range of topics, including the role of higher education as a place where, in addition to learning, students learn how to communicate, think, interact with others, understand and embrace other cultures, become thoughtful citizens, and prepare for a professional life. Throughout, attention is paid to the role and method used by faculty and administration both in sustaining the status quo and introducing useful change. Annotation ©2006 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

Drawing on a large body of empirical evidence, former Harvard President Derek Bok examines how much progress college students actually make toward widely accepted goals of undergraduate education. His conclusions are sobering. Although most students make gains in many important respects, they improve much less than they should in such important areas as writing, critical thinking, quantitative skills, and moral reasoning. Large majorities of college seniors do not feel that they have made substantial progress in speaking a foreign language, acquiring cultural and aesthetic interests, or learning what they need to know to become active and informed citizens. Overall, despite their vastly increased resources, more powerful technology, and hundreds of new courses, colleges cannot be confident that students are learning more than they did fifty years ago.

Looking further, Bok finds that many important college courses are left to the least experienced teachers and that most professors continue to teach in ways that have proven to be less effective than other available methods. In reviewing their educational programs, however, faculties typically ignore this evidence. Instead, they spend most of their time discussing what courses to require, although the lasting impact of college will almost certainly depend much more on how the courses are taught.

In his final chapter, Bok describes the changes that faculties and academic leaders can make to help students accomplish more. Without ignoring the contributions that America's colleges have made, Bok delivers a powerful critique--one that educators will ignore at their peril.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments vii

Introduction 1

CHAPTER 1: The Evolution of American Colleges 11

CHAPTER 2: Faculty Attitudes toward Undergraduate Education 31

CHAPTER 3: Purposes 58

CHAPTER 4: Learning to Communicate 82

CHAPTER 5: Learning to Think 109

CHAPTER 6: Building Character 146

CHAPTER 7: Preparation for Citizenship 172

CHAPTER 8: Living with Diversity 194

CHAPTER 9: Preparing for a Global Society 225

CHAPTER 10: Acquiring Broader Interests 255

CHAPTER 11: Preparing for a Career 281

CHAPTER 12: Improving the Quality of Undergraduate Education 310

Notes 345

Index 395

Product Details

ISBN:
9780691125961
Subtitle:
A Candid Look at How Much Students Learn and Why They Should Be Learning More
Author:
Bok, Derek
Author:
Bok, Derek Curtis
Author:
BOK, Derek
Publisher:
Princeton University Press
Location:
Princeton
Subject:
Higher
Subject:
Education, higher
Subject:
Academic achievement
Subject:
Educational Policy & Reform
Subject:
Political Science and International Relations
Subject:
Economics
Subject:
Sociology
Subject:
Education
Subject:
Academic achievement -- United States.
Subject:
Education, Higher -- Aims and objectives.
Subject:
Higher education
Copyright:
Publication Date:
December 2005
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
College/higher education:
Language:
English
Pages:
424
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in 26 oz

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Education » Higher Education

Our Underachieving Colleges: A Candid Look at How Much Students Learn and Why They Should Be Learning More Used Hardcover
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Product details 424 pages Princeton University Press - English 9780691125961 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Drawing on a large body of empirical evidence, former Harvard President Derek Bok examines how much progress college students actually make toward widely accepted goals of undergraduate education. His conclusions are sobering. Although most students make gains in many important respects, they improve much less than they should in such important areas as writing, critical thinking, quantitative skills, and moral reasoning. Large majorities of college seniors do not feel that they have made substantial progress in speaking a foreign language, acquiring cultural and aesthetic interests, or learning what they need to know to become active and informed citizens. Overall, despite their vastly increased resources, more powerful technology, and hundreds of new courses, colleges cannot be confident that students are learning more than they did fifty years ago.

Looking further, Bok finds that many important college courses are left to the least experienced teachers and that most professors continue to teach in ways that have proven to be less effective than other available methods. In reviewing their educational programs, however, faculties typically ignore this evidence. Instead, they spend most of their time discussing what courses to require, although the lasting impact of college will almost certainly depend much more on how the courses are taught.

In his final chapter, Bok describes the changes that faculties and academic leaders can make to help students accomplish more. Without ignoring the contributions that America's colleges have made, Bok delivers a powerful critique--one that educators will ignore at their peril.

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