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Other titles in the Toni Morrison Lecture series:

Create Dangerously: The Immigrant Artist at Work (Toni Morrison Lecture)

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Create Dangerously: The Immigrant Artist at Work (Toni Morrison Lecture) Cover

ISBN13: 9780691140186
ISBN10: 0691140189
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

"Create dangerously, for people who read dangerously. This is what I've always thought it meant to be a writer. Writing, knowing in part that no matter how trivial your words may seem, someday, somewhere, someone may risk his or her life to read them."--Create Dangerously

In this deeply personal book, the celebrated Haitian-American writer Edwidge Danticat reflects on art and exile, examining what it means to be an immigrant artist from a country in crisis. Inspired by Albert Camus' lecture, "Create Dangerously," and combining memoir and essay, Danticat tells the stories of artists, including herself, who create despite, or because of, the horrors that drove them from their homelands and that continue to haunt them. Danticat eulogizes an aunt who guarded her family's homestead in the Haitian countryside, a cousin who died of AIDS while living in Miami as an undocumented alien, and a renowned Haitian radio journalist whose political assassination shocked the world. Danticat writes about the Haitian novelists she first read as a girl at the Brooklyn Public Library, a woman mutilated in a machete attack who became a public witness against torture, and the work of Jean-Michel Basquiat and other artists of Haitian descent. Danticat also suggests that the aftermaths of natural disasters in Haiti and the United States reveal that the countries are not as different as many Americans might like to believe.

Create Dangerously is an eloquent and moving expression of Danticat's belief that immigrant artists are obliged to bear witness when their countries of origin are suffering from violence, oppression, poverty, and tragedy.

Review:

"'In order to shield our shattered collective psyche from a long history of setbacks and disillusionment... we cultivate communal and historical amnesia...,' writes novelist Danticat in this lean collection of jaw-breaking horrors side by side with luminous insights. This volume, which grows out of the Toni Morrison lecture series at Princeton, is uneven and inorganic in patches. But in Danticat's many remarkable stories and pensées from the gut, one locates the inimitable power of truth. Authorship becomes an act of subversion when one's words might be read and acted on by someone risking his or her life if only to read them. Danticat reminds us that, in a cruel twist of fate, her native Haiti, earthquake-and-poverty-torn, gained independence, in a bloody slave uprising, not long after the U.S. did: our ties, usually unexamined, run painfully deep. Whether eulogizing her family, writing on leading journalist Jean Dominique's assassination and exiled author Marie Vieux-Chauvet, or discussing 'Madison Avenue Primitive' Jean-Michel Basquiat, Danticat documents what it means for an immigrant writer to create dangerously for immigrant readers who read dangerously, awakened and no longer participants in a culture of 'historical amnesia.' (Oct.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright PWyxz LLC)

Review:

"Danticat's message is a whisper in a hushed room." --Kristin Thiel, The Oregonian

Review:

"Whether the topic is Haiti's war of independence, 9/11, the artist, musician and actor Jean-Michel Basquiat, the January earthquake and its aftermath, Danticat writes with a compassionate insight but without a trace of sentimentality. Her prose is energetic, her vision is clear, the tragedies seemingly speaking for themselves." --Betsy Willeford, The Miami Herald

Review:

"Pick up Danticat's book and start reading. Its magic will leave time and space suspended around you. ''All artists, writers among them, have several stories one might call them creation myths that haunt and obsess them,'' Danticat writes in her opening essay. With those words, the central theme for this book is embedded deeply within the reader's mind, never to leave." ---The Canberra Times

Review:

"It’s a collection of essays that realign your thinking about what it means to write about actual people, actual history – and recent history in particular. Danticat is always convincing, always clear, but here she hits some very high notes and gets at questions no one else has answered adequately or at all." --Dave Eggers, Financial Times

Synopsis:

"This is the most powerful book I've read in years. Though delicate in its prose and civil in its tone, it hits like a freight train. It's a call to arms for all immigrants, all artists, all those who choose to bear witness, and all those who choose to listen. And though it describes great upheaval, tragedy, and injustice, it's full of humor, warmth, grace, and light."--Dave Eggers, author of Zeitoun and What Is the What

"Edwidge Danticat is a great literary artist. She is also a grand cultural critic whose wisdom and compassion loom large in this magnificent book."--Cornel West, Princeton University

"Edwidge Danticat's prose has a Chekhovian simplicity--an ability to state the most urgent truths in a measured and patiently plain style that gathers a luminous energy as it moves inexorably forward. In this book she makes a strong case that art, for immigrants from countries where human rights and even survival are often in jeopardy, must be a vocation to witness if it is not to be an idle luxury."--Madison Smartt Bell, author of Toussaint Louverture: A Biography

Create Dangerously is an intelligent and passionate book on the role of the immigrant artist. As in her fiction, the lucidity and humility of Edwidge Danticat's prose has a quiet force. This book is as much a testimonial to the spirit of resistance and defiance as it is an elegy for those who have died and disappeared; it is as much a provocation to the artist as it is a book of mourning."--Saidiya V. Hartman, author of Lose Your Mother: A Journey Along the Atlantic Slave Route

Synopsis:

"Create dangerously, for people who read dangerously. This is what I've always thought it meant to be a writer. Writing, knowing in part that no matter how trivial your words may seem, someday, somewhere, someone may risk his or her life to read them."--Create Dangerously

In this deeply personal book, the celebrated Haitian-American writer Edwidge Danticat reflects on art and exile, examining what it means to be an immigrant artist from a country in crisis. Inspired by Albert Camus' lecture, "Create Dangerously," and combining memoir and essay, Danticat tells the stories of artists, including herself, who create despite, or because of, the horrors that drove them from their homelands and that continue to haunt them. Danticat eulogizes an aunt who guarded her family's homestead in the Haitian countryside, a cousin who died of AIDS while living in Miami as an undocumented alien, and a renowned Haitian radio journalist whose political assassination shocked the world. Danticat writes about the Haitian novelists she first read as a girl at the Brooklyn Public Library, a woman mutilated in a machete attack who became a public witness against torture, and the work of Jean-Michel Basquiat and other artists of Haitian descent. Danticat also suggests that the aftermaths of natural disasters in Haiti and the United States reveal that the countries are not as different as many Americans might like to believe.

Create Dangerously is an eloquent and moving expression of Danticat's belief that immigrant artists are obliged to bear witness when their countries of origin are suffering from violence, oppression, poverty, and tragedy.

About the Author

Edwidge Danticat was born in Haiti in 1969 and moved to the United States when she was twelve. She is the author of two novels, two collections of stories, two books for young adults, and two nonfiction books, one of which, "Brother, I'm Dying", was a finalist for the National Book Award and winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award for autobiography. In 2009, she received a MacArthur Fellowship.

Table of Contents

CHAPTER 1: Create Dangerously: Th e Immigrant Artist at Work 1

CHAPTER 2: Walk Straight 21

CHAPTER 3: I Am Not a Journalist 41

CHAPTER 4: Daughters of Memory 59

CHAPTER 5: I Speak Out 73

CHAPTER 6: The Other Side of the Water 87

CHAPTER 7: Bicentennial 97

CHAPTER 8: Another Country 107

CHAPTER 9: Flying Home 115

CHAPTER 10: Welcoming Ghosts 127

CHAPTER 11: Acheiropoietos 137

CHAPTER 12: Our Guernica 153

Acknowledgments 175

Notes 177

Index 183

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

tom virgin, January 1, 2011 (view all comments by tom virgin)
This book is a must read for every artist or creative person, heck ... every human being that has an effect on the world. Although it purports to be a series of essays for and about immigrants, it is really a guide to leaving a lasting and loving mark on the world you live in. Edwidge talks like a loving sister who also has a mean left hook. She means business. Read it, pass it along.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No

Product Details

ISBN:
9780691140186
Author:
Danticat, Edwidge
Publisher:
Princeton University Press
Subject:
Personal Memoirs
Subject:
General
Subject:
Authors, American -- 20th century.
Subject:
Emigration and immigration
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Literature: Primary Works and Letters
Subject:
Postcolonial Studies
Subject:
Comparative Literature
Subject:
American history
Subject:
American literature
Subject:
Art and architecture
Subject:
Biography-Literary
Series:
Toni Morrison Lecture
Publication Date:
20100931
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Pages:
200
Dimensions:
8.5 x 5.5 in 13 oz

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Create Dangerously: The Immigrant Artist at Work (Toni Morrison Lecture) Used Hardcover
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$9.95 In Stock
Product details 200 pages Princeton University Press - English 9780691140186 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "'In order to shield our shattered collective psyche from a long history of setbacks and disillusionment... we cultivate communal and historical amnesia...,' writes novelist Danticat in this lean collection of jaw-breaking horrors side by side with luminous insights. This volume, which grows out of the Toni Morrison lecture series at Princeton, is uneven and inorganic in patches. But in Danticat's many remarkable stories and pensées from the gut, one locates the inimitable power of truth. Authorship becomes an act of subversion when one's words might be read and acted on by someone risking his or her life if only to read them. Danticat reminds us that, in a cruel twist of fate, her native Haiti, earthquake-and-poverty-torn, gained independence, in a bloody slave uprising, not long after the U.S. did: our ties, usually unexamined, run painfully deep. Whether eulogizing her family, writing on leading journalist Jean Dominique's assassination and exiled author Marie Vieux-Chauvet, or discussing 'Madison Avenue Primitive' Jean-Michel Basquiat, Danticat documents what it means for an immigrant writer to create dangerously for immigrant readers who read dangerously, awakened and no longer participants in a culture of 'historical amnesia.' (Oct.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright PWyxz LLC)
"Review" by , "Danticat's message is a whisper in a hushed room." --
"Review" by , "Whether the topic is Haiti's war of independence, 9/11, the artist, musician and actor Jean-Michel Basquiat, the January earthquake and its aftermath, Danticat writes with a compassionate insight but without a trace of sentimentality. Her prose is energetic, her vision is clear, the tragedies seemingly speaking for themselves." --
"Review" by , "Pick up Danticat's book and start reading. Its magic will leave time and space suspended around you. ''All artists, writers among them, have several stories one might call them creation myths that haunt and obsess them,'' Danticat writes in her opening essay. With those words, the central theme for this book is embedded deeply within the reader's mind, never to leave." ---
"Review" by , "It’s a collection of essays that realign your thinking about what it means to write about actual people, actual history – and recent history in particular. Danticat is always convincing, always clear, but here she hits some very high notes and gets at questions no one else has answered adequately or at all." --
"Synopsis" by , "This is the most powerful book I've read in years. Though delicate in its prose and civil in its tone, it hits like a freight train. It's a call to arms for all immigrants, all artists, all those who choose to bear witness, and all those who choose to listen. And though it describes great upheaval, tragedy, and injustice, it's full of humor, warmth, grace, and light."--Dave Eggers, author of Zeitoun and What Is the What

"Edwidge Danticat is a great literary artist. She is also a grand cultural critic whose wisdom and compassion loom large in this magnificent book."--Cornel West, Princeton University

"Edwidge Danticat's prose has a Chekhovian simplicity--an ability to state the most urgent truths in a measured and patiently plain style that gathers a luminous energy as it moves inexorably forward. In this book she makes a strong case that art, for immigrants from countries where human rights and even survival are often in jeopardy, must be a vocation to witness if it is not to be an idle luxury."--Madison Smartt Bell, author of Toussaint Louverture: A Biography

Create Dangerously is an intelligent and passionate book on the role of the immigrant artist. As in her fiction, the lucidity and humility of Edwidge Danticat's prose has a quiet force. This book is as much a testimonial to the spirit of resistance and defiance as it is an elegy for those who have died and disappeared; it is as much a provocation to the artist as it is a book of mourning."--Saidiya V. Hartman, author of Lose Your Mother: A Journey Along the Atlantic Slave Route

"Synopsis" by , "Create dangerously, for people who read dangerously. This is what I've always thought it meant to be a writer. Writing, knowing in part that no matter how trivial your words may seem, someday, somewhere, someone may risk his or her life to read them."--Create Dangerously

In this deeply personal book, the celebrated Haitian-American writer Edwidge Danticat reflects on art and exile, examining what it means to be an immigrant artist from a country in crisis. Inspired by Albert Camus' lecture, "Create Dangerously," and combining memoir and essay, Danticat tells the stories of artists, including herself, who create despite, or because of, the horrors that drove them from their homelands and that continue to haunt them. Danticat eulogizes an aunt who guarded her family's homestead in the Haitian countryside, a cousin who died of AIDS while living in Miami as an undocumented alien, and a renowned Haitian radio journalist whose political assassination shocked the world. Danticat writes about the Haitian novelists she first read as a girl at the Brooklyn Public Library, a woman mutilated in a machete attack who became a public witness against torture, and the work of Jean-Michel Basquiat and other artists of Haitian descent. Danticat also suggests that the aftermaths of natural disasters in Haiti and the United States reveal that the countries are not as different as many Americans might like to believe.

Create Dangerously is an eloquent and moving expression of Danticat's belief that immigrant artists are obliged to bear witness when their countries of origin are suffering from violence, oppression, poverty, and tragedy.

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