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Overreach (12 Edition)

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Overreach (12 Edition) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

"George Edwards has written a cogently argued, data-driven analysis of the Obama administration's failure to appreciate the opportunities and limitations of exercising power in the American political system. In the process, Edwards shows the relevancy of his and other scholarship for presidents, their advisers, and serious students of the American presidency."--Stephen J. Wayne, Georgetown University

"George Edwards is our leading analyst of the probabilities of presidential power. He shows that presidents are most effective at the margins, when they exploit existing opportunities rather than when they try to build new coalitions. And when they succeed (as with Obamacare) they might well be careful what they wish for. This book is a superb analysis of Obama's leadership style, and is essential reading for White House counselors."--Richard Pious, Barnard College

"In this provocative, accessible, and timely volume, George Edwards presents a sobering analysis not just of the Obama presidency, but of the very possibility of transformative political change. Overreach constitutes a valuable reminder that what the public expects of presidents, and what presidents expect of themselves, often amounts to a gross exaggeration of what is genuinely possible. Moreover, this book argues, presidents who proceed undaunted risk paying a significant political cost."--William G. Howell, University of Chicago

"Presidents facing criticism or difficulties--which is to say, all of them--normally blame their problems on a failure to communicate rather than their own policy choices. With a special focus on Barack Obama, though, Overreach shows us that presidential choices are the key, since attempts to use communication skills to change hearts and minds are largely doomed to failure. Fluently written, this book provides both a good read and important claims to consider."--Andrew Rudalevige, Dickinson College

Review:

"Obama's team entered office under the assumption that 'the recession left public opinion malleable and highly responsive to bold leadership,' but this study of Obama's efforts to achieve too much too quickly shows how wrong this belief was. Political scientist Edwards (The Strategic President), a presidency scholar at Texas A&M, points out that given the recession, Bush's massive TARP program, and several industry bailouts, a risk averse public was wary of new governmental initiatives. Using the bruising and barely won battle over health care reform as a case study, he reveals that a plurality of the public never favored it while the president has had difficulty framing the debate against a welter of competing media voices. Edwards's analysis is particularly strong on the collapse of bipartisanship in Congress, and he marshals an impressive amount of data on public opinion and congressional voting records. However, his overall thesis that presidents 'are not in strong positions to create opportunities for legislative success' but must use existing opportunities, is not fully fleshed out. He also falls short by ending with a discussion of the 2011 debt ceiling showdown instead of potential ways for Obama's administration to move forward. Despite such omissions, this remains a clear, well-documented study of the limits on presidential power and influence." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

"George Edwards has written a cogently argued, data-driven analysis of the Obama administration's failure to appreciate the opportunities and limitations of exercising power in the American political system. In the process, Edwards shows the relevancy of his and other scholarship for presidents, their advisers, and serious students of the American presidency."--Stephen J. Wayne, Georgetown University

"George Edwards is our leading analyst of the probabilities of presidential power. He shows that presidents are most effective at the margins, when they exploit existing opportunities rather than when they try to build new coalitions. And when they succeed (as with Obamacare) they might well be careful what they wish for. This book is a superb analysis of Obama's leadership style, and is essential reading for White House counselors."--Richard Pious, Barnard College

"In this provocative, accessible, and timely volume, George Edwards presents a sobering analysis not just of the Obama presidency, but of the very possibility of transformative political change. Overreach constitutes a valuable reminder that what the public expects of presidents, and what presidents expect of themselves, often amounts to a gross exaggeration of what is genuinely possible. Moreover, this book argues, presidents who proceed undaunted risk paying a significant political cost."--William G. Howell, University of Chicago

"Presidents facing criticism or difficulties--which is to say, all of them--normally blame their problems on a failure to communicate rather than their own policy choices. With a special focus on Barack Obama, though, Overreach shows us that presidential choices are the key, since attempts to use communication skills to change hearts and minds are largely doomed to failure. Fluently written, this book provides both a good read and important claims to consider."--Andrew Rudalevige, Dickinson College

Synopsis:

When Barack Obama became president, many Americans embraced him as a transformational leader who would fundamentally change the politics and policy of the country. Yet, two years into his administration, the public resisted his calls for support and Congress was deadlocked over many of his major policy proposals. How could this capable new president have difficulty attaining his goals? Did he lack tactical skills?

In Overreach, respected presidential scholar George Edwards argues that the problem was strategic, not tactical. He finds that in President Obama's first two years in office, Obama governed on the premise that he could create opportunities for change by persuading the public and some congressional Republicans to support his major initiatives. As a result, he proposed a large, expensive, and polarizing agenda in the middle of a severe economic crisis. The president's proposals alienated many Americans and led to a severe electoral defeat for the Democrats in the 2010 midterm elections, undermining his ability to govern in the remainder of his term.

Edwards shows that the president's frustrations were predictable and the inevitable result of misunderstanding the nature of presidential power. The author demonstrates that the essence of successful presidential leadership is recognizing and exploiting existing opportunities, not in creating them through persuasion. When Obama succeeded in passing important policies, it was by mobilizing Democrats who were already predisposed to back him. Thus, to avoid overreaching, presidents should be alert to the limitations of their power to persuade and rigorously assess the possibilities for obtaining public and congressional support in their environments.

About the Author

George C. Edwards III is University Distinguished Professor of Political Science and the Jordan Chair in Presidential Studies at Texas A&M University. His many books include "The Strategic President." He is the editor of "Presidential Studies Quarterly."

Table of Contents

Preface ix

Introduction 1

Chapter 1: Assessing Opportunities: Public Support 9

Chapter 2: Creating Opportunities? Going Public 36

Chapter 3: Evaluating Strategic Choices: Leading the Public 80

Chapter 4: Assessing Opportunities: Congressional Support 116

Chapter 5: Creating Opportunities? Leading Congress 135

Chapter 6: Evaluating Strategic Choices: Passing Legislation 157

Chapter 7: Persuasion and Opportunity in Presidential Leadership 179

Notes 189

Index 225

Product Details

ISBN:
9780691153681
Author:
Edwards, George C.
Publisher:
Princeton University Press
Author:
III, George C. Edwards
Author:
Edwards, George C., III
Subject:
Leadership
Subject:
Political Science and International Relations
Subject:
American history
Subject:
Politics - General
Publication Date:
20120331
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
39 tables. 1 map.
Pages:
224
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » Politics » United States » Politics
History and Social Science » World History » General

Overreach (12 Edition) New Hardcover
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Product details 224 pages Princeton University Press - English 9780691153681 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Obama's team entered office under the assumption that 'the recession left public opinion malleable and highly responsive to bold leadership,' but this study of Obama's efforts to achieve too much too quickly shows how wrong this belief was. Political scientist Edwards (The Strategic President), a presidency scholar at Texas A&M, points out that given the recession, Bush's massive TARP program, and several industry bailouts, a risk averse public was wary of new governmental initiatives. Using the bruising and barely won battle over health care reform as a case study, he reveals that a plurality of the public never favored it while the president has had difficulty framing the debate against a welter of competing media voices. Edwards's analysis is particularly strong on the collapse of bipartisanship in Congress, and he marshals an impressive amount of data on public opinion and congressional voting records. However, his overall thesis that presidents 'are not in strong positions to create opportunities for legislative success' but must use existing opportunities, is not fully fleshed out. He also falls short by ending with a discussion of the 2011 debt ceiling showdown instead of potential ways for Obama's administration to move forward. Despite such omissions, this remains a clear, well-documented study of the limits on presidential power and influence." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by , "George Edwards has written a cogently argued, data-driven analysis of the Obama administration's failure to appreciate the opportunities and limitations of exercising power in the American political system. In the process, Edwards shows the relevancy of his and other scholarship for presidents, their advisers, and serious students of the American presidency."--Stephen J. Wayne, Georgetown University

"George Edwards is our leading analyst of the probabilities of presidential power. He shows that presidents are most effective at the margins, when they exploit existing opportunities rather than when they try to build new coalitions. And when they succeed (as with Obamacare) they might well be careful what they wish for. This book is a superb analysis of Obama's leadership style, and is essential reading for White House counselors."--Richard Pious, Barnard College

"In this provocative, accessible, and timely volume, George Edwards presents a sobering analysis not just of the Obama presidency, but of the very possibility of transformative political change. Overreach constitutes a valuable reminder that what the public expects of presidents, and what presidents expect of themselves, often amounts to a gross exaggeration of what is genuinely possible. Moreover, this book argues, presidents who proceed undaunted risk paying a significant political cost."--William G. Howell, University of Chicago

"Presidents facing criticism or difficulties--which is to say, all of them--normally blame their problems on a failure to communicate rather than their own policy choices. With a special focus on Barack Obama, though, Overreach shows us that presidential choices are the key, since attempts to use communication skills to change hearts and minds are largely doomed to failure. Fluently written, this book provides both a good read and important claims to consider."--Andrew Rudalevige, Dickinson College

"Synopsis" by , When Barack Obama became president, many Americans embraced him as a transformational leader who would fundamentally change the politics and policy of the country. Yet, two years into his administration, the public resisted his calls for support and Congress was deadlocked over many of his major policy proposals. How could this capable new president have difficulty attaining his goals? Did he lack tactical skills?

In Overreach, respected presidential scholar George Edwards argues that the problem was strategic, not tactical. He finds that in President Obama's first two years in office, Obama governed on the premise that he could create opportunities for change by persuading the public and some congressional Republicans to support his major initiatives. As a result, he proposed a large, expensive, and polarizing agenda in the middle of a severe economic crisis. The president's proposals alienated many Americans and led to a severe electoral defeat for the Democrats in the 2010 midterm elections, undermining his ability to govern in the remainder of his term.

Edwards shows that the president's frustrations were predictable and the inevitable result of misunderstanding the nature of presidential power. The author demonstrates that the essence of successful presidential leadership is recognizing and exploiting existing opportunities, not in creating them through persuasion. When Obama succeeded in passing important policies, it was by mobilizing Democrats who were already predisposed to back him. Thus, to avoid overreaching, presidents should be alert to the limitations of their power to persuade and rigorously assess the possibilities for obtaining public and congressional support in their environments.

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