Summer Reading B2G1 Free
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN a $100 Credit

Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news
for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

Visit our stores


    Recently Viewed clear list


    Lists | July 29, 2015

    Edward Carey: IMG 10 Best Books by Writer-Illustrators



    As a child who loved books I was fascinated by the illustrations just as much as the text. The same is true for me today, and I'm happy to be among... Continue »
    1. $11.89 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

      Foulsham (Iremonger Series #2)

      Edward Carey 9781468309546

    spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$12.95
List price: $18.95
Used Trade Paper
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Beaverton Education- General
1 Burnside Education- General

This title in other editions

Other titles in the Princeton Studies in Cultural Sociology series:

Privilege: The Making of an Adolescent Elite at St. Paul's School (Princeton Studies in Cultural Sociology)

by

Privilege: The Making of an Adolescent Elite at St. Paul's School (Princeton Studies in Cultural Sociology) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

“Perhaps,” wrote Ralph Ellison more than seventy years ago, “the zoot suit contains profound political meaning; perhaps the symmetrical frenzy of the Lindy-hop conceals clues to great potential power.” As Ellison noted then, many of our most mundane cultural forms are larger and more important than they appear, taking on great significance and an unexpected depth of meaning. What he saw in the power of the Lindy Hop—the dance that Life magazine once billed as “Americas True National Folk Dance”—would spread from black America to make a lasting impression on white America and offer us a truly compelling means of understanding our culture. But with what hidden implications?

In American Allegory, Black Hawk Hancock offers an embedded and embodied ethnography that situates dance within a larger Chicago landscape of segregated social practices. Delving into two Chicago dance worlds, the Lindy and Steppin, Hancock uses a combination of participant-observation and interviews to bring to the surface the racial tension that surrounds white use of black cultural forms. Focusing on new forms of appropriation in an era of multiculturalism, Hancock underscores the institutionalization of racial disparities and offers wonderful insights into the intersection of race and culture in America.

Synopsis:

"Privilege is superb. Khan skillfully narrates from the perspective of both teacher and researcher, and the personal portraits are very well-rounded. This important book is a masterly look at a disturbing current in the formation of elite American society."--Richard Sennett, author of The Corrosion of Character

"This is a terrific book. Khan's strong authorial voice and wonderful personality shine through and it is a pleasure to follow his life and travails at St. Paul's."--Michèle Lamont, Harvard University

Synopsis:

As one of the most prestigious high schools in the nation, St. Paul's School in Concord, New Hampshire, has long been the exclusive domain of America's wealthiest sons. But times have changed. Today, a new elite of boys and girls is being molded at St. Paul's, one that reflects the hope of openness but also the persistence of inequality.

In Privilege, Shamus Khan returns to his alma mater to provide an inside look at an institution that has been the private realm of the elite for the past 150 years. He shows that St. Paul's students continue to learn what they always have--how to embody privilege. Yet, while students once leveraged the trappings of upper-class entitlement, family connections, and high culture, current St. Paul's students learn to succeed in a more diverse environment. To be the future leaders of a more democratic world, they must be at ease with everything from highbrow art to everyday life--from Beowulf to Jaws--and view hierarchies as ladders to scale. Through deft portrayals of the relationships among students, faculty, and staff, Khan shows how members of the new elite face the opening of society while still preserving the advantages that allow them to rule.

About the Author

Shamus Rahman Khan is assistant professor of sociology at Columbia University. He is an alumnus and former faculty member of St. Pauls School

Table of Contents

Introduction: Democratic Inequality 1

Chapter 1. The New Elite 18

Chapter 2. Finding One's Place 41

Chapter 3. The Ease of Privilege 77

Chapter 4. Gender and the Performance of Privilege 114

Chapter 5. Learning Beowulf and Jaws 151

Conclusion 193

Methodological and Theoretical Reflections 201

Acknowledgments 207

Notes 211

Works Cited 223

Index 229

Product Details

ISBN:
9780691156231
Author:
Khan, Shamus
Publisher:
Princeton University Press
Author:
Khan, Shamus Rahman
Author:
Hancock, Black Hawk
Subject:
Secondary
Subject:
Education
Subject:
Sociology
Subject:
Education-General
Subject:
Higher education
Subject:
Sociology - Urban
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Hardcover
Series:
Princeton Studies in Cultural Sociology
Publication Date:
20121014
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Pages:
248
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

Related Subjects

» Education » General
» Featured Titles » History and Social Science
» Health and Self-Help » Self-Help » General
» History and Social Science » Sociology » General
» History and Social Science » Sociology » Social Classes

Privilege: The Making of an Adolescent Elite at St. Paul's School (Princeton Studies in Cultural Sociology) Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$12.95 In Stock
Product details 248 pages Princeton University Press - English 9780691156231 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , "Privilege is superb. Khan skillfully narrates from the perspective of both teacher and researcher, and the personal portraits are very well-rounded. This important book is a masterly look at a disturbing current in the formation of elite American society."--Richard Sennett, author of The Corrosion of Character

"This is a terrific book. Khan's strong authorial voice and wonderful personality shine through and it is a pleasure to follow his life and travails at St. Paul's."--Michèle Lamont, Harvard University

"Synopsis" by , As one of the most prestigious high schools in the nation, St. Paul's School in Concord, New Hampshire, has long been the exclusive domain of America's wealthiest sons. But times have changed. Today, a new elite of boys and girls is being molded at St. Paul's, one that reflects the hope of openness but also the persistence of inequality.

In Privilege, Shamus Khan returns to his alma mater to provide an inside look at an institution that has been the private realm of the elite for the past 150 years. He shows that St. Paul's students continue to learn what they always have--how to embody privilege. Yet, while students once leveraged the trappings of upper-class entitlement, family connections, and high culture, current St. Paul's students learn to succeed in a more diverse environment. To be the future leaders of a more democratic world, they must be at ease with everything from highbrow art to everyday life--from Beowulf to Jaws--and view hierarchies as ladders to scale. Through deft portrayals of the relationships among students, faculty, and staff, Khan shows how members of the new elite face the opening of society while still preserving the advantages that allow them to rule.

spacer
spacer
  • back to top

FOLLOW US ON...

     
Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.