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The Discretionary President: The Promise and Peril of Executive Power

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The Discretionary President: The Promise and Peril of Executive Power Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

George W. Bush's use of the war on terror to justify the creation of a unitary executive, acting outside and even against the law, was a source of praise and blame for his administration. Immediately after 9/11, a constitutionalist would have worried about the peril of executive power, but today he might worry that we ignore its promise and distrust discretionary actions that truly ought to be taken by presidents in times of peril.

Benjamin Kleinerman addresses the fundamental question of what role discretionary executive power should play in a constitutional order, reexamining what has become an intractable debate to show that what can destroy our Constitution also has the potential to save it. Kleinerman traces this problem from Hobbes through Lincoln to address one of the central dilemmas of our post-9/11 age: how to empower the president to respond to legitimate threats without endangering the constitutional order. He stakes out a middle ground in this highly contentious debate, affirming that a president has the discretionary power to act for the public good without statutory authorization-but warning that, to remain constitutional, it must be truly discretionary power that could not be legalized.

Kleinerman articulates and defends a "constitutional politics of necessity," best exemplified by Lincoln, in which opponents should call on presidents to defend the necessity of exceptional actions and explain why they had to be taken outside the existing legal framework, beyond simply being "for the public good." He observes that Lincoln acknowledged the illegality of his actions while claiming their necessity but that Bush claimed powers as if they were permanent. He also reexamines separation of powers in light of executive discretion, suggesting that, during times of insecurity, discretionary executive power can be devoted to preservation of the Constitution so long as the other branches remain vigilant.

Kleinerman argues for a president sufficiently strong to take actions without which we cannot be secure yet sufficiently circumscribed that such actions do not become the norm. His book delineates the tough distinctions citizens need to make between the necessary exercise of extraordinary powers and the dangerous aggrandizement of unnecessary power.

Synopsis:

Examines both the peril and the promise of presidential power to clarify that what can destroy our Constitution can—if the threat is dire—also save it. An unusually balanced study that argues for a middle path whereby presidents choose consciously to act temporarily outside or even against the laws in serving the nation's best interest.

Table of Contents

Preface

Acknowledgments

Abbreviations

Introduction

1. Hobbes's Liberal Absolutism

2. Locke's Attempt at Taming the Prince

3. The Federalist Constitution

4. Hamilton's Executive Government

5. Madison's Landmarks of Power

6. Jefferson's Prerogative

7. Lincoln's Example

8. The Civil War Confiscation Debate

9. The Discretionary Executive and the Separation of Powers

Conclusion

Notes

Bibliography

Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9780700616657
Subtitle:
The Promise and Peril of Executive Power
Author:
Kleinerman, Benjamin A.
Publisher:
University Press of Kansas
Subject:
Executive power -- United States -- History.
Subject:
Separation of powers -- United States.
Subject:
Political Freedom & Security - Law Enforcement
Subject:
Government - Executive Branch
Subject:
History & Theory - General
Subject:
Constitutional
Subject:
Politics - General
Publication Date:
20090904
Binding:
Hardback
Language:
English
Pages:
338
Dimensions:
9.30x6.40x1.20 in. 1.45 lbs.

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Law » Constitutional Law
History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » Politics » United States » Politics

The Discretionary President: The Promise and Peril of Executive Power New Hardcover
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Product details 338 pages University Press of Kansas - English 9780700616657 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Examines both the peril and the promise of presidential power to clarify that what can destroy our Constitution can—if the threat is dire—also save it. An unusually balanced study that argues for a middle path whereby presidents choose consciously to act temporarily outside or even against the laws in serving the nation's best interest.
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