It's Raining Books Sale
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Original Essays | September 15, 2014

Lois Leveen: IMG Forsooth Me Not: Shakespeare, Juliet, Her Nurse, and a Novel



There's this writer, William Shakespeare. Perhaps you've heard of him. He wrote this play, Romeo and Juliet. Maybe you've heard of it as well. It's... Continue »
  1. $18.19 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

    Juliet's Nurse

    Lois Leveen 9781476757445

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$9.95
Used Hardcover
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Burnside Latin America- Cuba

Waiting for Snow in Havana: Confessions of a Cuban Boy

by

Waiting for Snow in Havana: Confessions of a Cuban Boy Cover

ISBN13: 9780743219655
ISBN10: 0743219651
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
All Product Details

Only 1 left in stock at $9.95!

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

A childhood in a privileged household in 1950s Havana is joyous and cruel, like any other — but with exotic differences. Lizards roam the house and grounds. Fights aren't waged with snowballs but with breadfruit. The narrator's father, a judge, is certain that in a past life he was Louis XVI and his wife Marie Antoinette. In a home crammed with portraits of Jesus that speak to him in dreams and nightmares, young Carlos Eire searches for secret proofs of the existence of God, determined to best St. Thomas Aquinas by coming up with more than five.

Then, in January 1959, the world changes: President Batista is suddenly gone, a cigar-smoking guerrilla — Fidel Castro — has taken his place, and Christmas is canceled. The echo of firing squads is everywhere. And, one by one, the author's schoolmates begin to disappear — spirited away to the United States. Carlos will end up there himself, alone, never to see his father again. The journey will test his soul.

Narrated with the urgency of a confession, Waiting for Snow in Havana is both an ode to a paradise lost and an exorcism. More than that, it captures the terrible beauty of those times in our lives when we are certain we have died — and then are somehow, miraculously, reborn.

Review:

"[C]omplex, introspective....In this open, honest, and at times angry memoir, Eire bares his soul completely and captivates the reader in the process." Booklist

Review:

"Between mercurial and leisurely, lush and thorny, jumbled and crystalline, Yale historian Eire's recollection of his Cuban boyhood is to be savored." Kirkus Reviews

Review:

"As imaginatively wrought as the finest piece of fiction." Publishers Weekly

Review:

"What is powerful and lasting about the book is his evocation of childhood...and his extraordinary literary ability." The Los Angeles Times

Review:

"Eire's tone is so urgent and so vividly personal...that his unsparing indictments of practically everyone concerned, including himself, seem all the more remarkable." New Yorker

Synopsis:

Narrated with the urgency of a confession, "Waiting for Snow in Havana" is both an ode to a paradise lost and an exorcism. More than that, it captures the terrible beauty of those times in readers lives when they are certain they have died--and then are somehow, miraculously, reborn.

Synopsis:

In 1962, at the age of eleven, Carlos Eire was one of 14,000 children airlifted out of Cuba, his parents left behind. His life until then is the subject of "Waiting for Snow in Havana, " a wry, heartbreaking, intoxicatingly beautiful memoir of growing up in a privileged Havana household — and of being exiled from his own childhood by the Cuban revolution.

That childhood, until his world changes, is as joyous and troubled as any other — but with exotic differences. Lizards roam the house and grounds. Fights aren't waged with snowballs but with breadfruit. The rich are outlandishly rich, like the eight-year-old son of a sugar baron who has a real miniature race car, or the neighbor with a private animal garden, complete with tiger. All this is bathed in sunlight and shades of turquoise and tangerine: the island of Cuba, says one of the stern monks at Carlos's school, might have been the original Paradise — and it is tempting to believe.

His father is a municipal judge and an obsessive collector of art and antiques, convinced that in a past life he was Louis XVI and that his wife was Marie Antoinette. His mother looks to the future; conceived on a transatlantic liner bound for Cuba from Spain, she wants her children to be modern, which means embracing all things American. His older brother electrocutes lizards. Surrounded by eccentrics, in a home crammed with portraits of Jesus that speak to him in dreams and nightmares, Carlos searches for secret proofs of the existence of God.

Then, in January 1959, President Batista is suddenly gone, a cigar-smoking guerrilla named Castro has taken his place, and Christmas is canceled. The echo of firing squads is everywhere. At the Aquarium of the Revolution, sharks multiply in a swimming pool. And one by one, the author's schoolmates begin to disappear — spirited away to the United States. Carlos will end up there himself, alone, never to see his father again.

Narrated with the urgency of a confession, "Waiting for Snow in Havana" is both an exorcism and an ode to a paradise lost. More than that, it captures the terrible beauty of those times in our lives when we are certain we have died — and then are somehow, miraculously, reborn.

About the Author

Born in Havana, Carlos Eire is now the T. Lawrason Riggs Professor of History and Religious Studies at Yale University. He lives in Guilford, Connecticut, with his wife, Jane, and their three children.

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

ranneyclanmom, March 30, 2013 (view all comments by ranneyclanmom)
This book was SO good. Carlos speaks as a child to the child in me. I also used to wake and watch the dust motes in the sunlight. I also had irrational fears and cherished dreams. Although I did not live through the drama, trauma, and danger of the Cuban revolution, I feel like I have in the aftermath of reading this book.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No

Product Details

ISBN:
9780743219655
Subtitle:
Confessions of a Cuban Boy
Author:
Eire, Carlos M. N.
Author:
Carlos Eire
Author:
Eire, Carlos M. N.
Publisher:
Simon & Schuster
Location:
New York
Subject:
General
Subject:
History
Subject:
Chicago
Subject:
Cuba
Subject:
Cuban Americans
Subject:
Refugee children.
Subject:
Havana
Subject:
Personal Memoirs
Subject:
Caribbean & West Indies - General
Subject:
General Biography
Subject:
Biography & Autobiography : Personal Memoirs
Subject:
History-Caribbean & West Indies - General
Copyright:
Series Volume:
133
Publication Date:
February 2003
Binding:
ELECTRONIC
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Yes
Pages:
400
Dimensions:
9.44x6.58x1.20 in. 1.36 lbs.

Other books you might like

  1. Middlemarch (World's Classics) Used Trade Paper $6.50
  2. The Great Fire
    Used Trade Paper $4.50
  3. The Secret Life of Bees Used Trade Paper $4.95
  4. Stormbreaker (Alex Rider Adventures)
    Used Trade Paper $1.50
  5. Frog Girl Used Trade Paper $3.95
  6. The Moon (Universe) New Library Bound $24.95

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Latin America » Cuba

Waiting for Snow in Havana: Confessions of a Cuban Boy Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$9.95 In Stock
Product details 400 pages Simon & Schuster - English 9780743219655 Reviews:
"Review" by , "[C]omplex, introspective....In this open, honest, and at times angry memoir, Eire bares his soul completely and captivates the reader in the process."
"Review" by , "Between mercurial and leisurely, lush and thorny, jumbled and crystalline, Yale historian Eire's recollection of his Cuban boyhood is to be savored."
"Review" by , "As imaginatively wrought as the finest piece of fiction."
"Review" by , "What is powerful and lasting about the book is his evocation of childhood...and his extraordinary literary ability."
"Review" by , "Eire's tone is so urgent and so vividly personal...that his unsparing indictments of practically everyone concerned, including himself, seem all the more remarkable."
"Synopsis" by , Narrated with the urgency of a confession, "Waiting for Snow in Havana" is both an ode to a paradise lost and an exorcism. More than that, it captures the terrible beauty of those times in readers lives when they are certain they have died--and then are somehow, miraculously, reborn.
"Synopsis" by , In 1962, at the age of eleven, Carlos Eire was one of 14,000 children airlifted out of Cuba, his parents left behind. His life until then is the subject of "Waiting for Snow in Havana, " a wry, heartbreaking, intoxicatingly beautiful memoir of growing up in a privileged Havana household — and of being exiled from his own childhood by the Cuban revolution.

That childhood, until his world changes, is as joyous and troubled as any other — but with exotic differences. Lizards roam the house and grounds. Fights aren't waged with snowballs but with breadfruit. The rich are outlandishly rich, like the eight-year-old son of a sugar baron who has a real miniature race car, or the neighbor with a private animal garden, complete with tiger. All this is bathed in sunlight and shades of turquoise and tangerine: the island of Cuba, says one of the stern monks at Carlos's school, might have been the original Paradise — and it is tempting to believe.

His father is a municipal judge and an obsessive collector of art and antiques, convinced that in a past life he was Louis XVI and that his wife was Marie Antoinette. His mother looks to the future; conceived on a transatlantic liner bound for Cuba from Spain, she wants her children to be modern, which means embracing all things American. His older brother electrocutes lizards. Surrounded by eccentrics, in a home crammed with portraits of Jesus that speak to him in dreams and nightmares, Carlos searches for secret proofs of the existence of God.

Then, in January 1959, President Batista is suddenly gone, a cigar-smoking guerrilla named Castro has taken his place, and Christmas is canceled. The echo of firing squads is everywhere. At the Aquarium of the Revolution, sharks multiply in a swimming pool. And one by one, the author's schoolmates begin to disappear — spirited away to the United States. Carlos will end up there himself, alone, never to see his father again.

Narrated with the urgency of a confession, "Waiting for Snow in Havana" is both an exorcism and an ode to a paradise lost. More than that, it captures the terrible beauty of those times in our lives when we are certain we have died — and then are somehow, miraculously, reborn.

spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.