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1 Beaverton Literature- A to Z

Cosmopolis: A Novel

by

Cosmopolis: A Novel Cover

 

Review-A-Day

"Like Underworld, Don DeLillo's new novel is an up-to-the-minute gizmo with a nineteenth-century heart. It tells the story of a day of reckoning, a day in the life of a young billionaire financier named Eric Packer, who begins the book full of postmodern cynicism and Manhattan materialism, and ends it chastened, suddenly penniless, and eager to change his life." James Wood, The New Republic (read the entire New Republic review)

Synopses & Reviews

From Powells.com:

With his customary verve DeLillo celebrates the end of the millennium with a sleek powerhouse of a novel. While the surface is a brash and biting commentary on the late twentieth-century world of finance, delve below and one discovers DeLillo continuing to map human frailty and alienation in frightening precision. Georgie, Powells.com

Publisher Comments:

It is an April day in the year 2000 and an era is about to end. The booming times of market optimism — when the culture boiled with money and corporations seemed more vital and influential than governments — are poised to crash. Eric Packer, a billionaire asset manager at age twenty-eight, emerges from his penthouse triplex and settles into his lavishly customized white stretch limousine. Today he is a man with two missions: to pursue a cataclysmic bet against the yen and to get a haircut across town. Stalled in traffic by a presidential motorcade, a music idol's funeral, and a violent political demonstration, Eric receives a string of visitors — experts on security, technology, currency, finance, and a few sexual partners — as the limo sputters toward an increasingly uncertain future.

Cosmopolis, Don DeLillo's thirteenth novel, is both intimate and global, a vivid and moving account of the spectacular downfall of one man, and of an era.

Review:

"[A] monotone 13th novel....[DeLillo] seems surprisingly disengaged here. His spotlighted New Economy icon, Eric, doesn't work, either as a genius financier...or a thinker....DeLillo is surely an American master, but this time out, he is doodling." Publishers Weekly

Review:

"[B]leakly funny....DeLillo assembles [his] quirky particulars expertly — and he still writes better sentences than any other contemporary author....The tale is ingenious and amusing, and there?s a chilling logic to its eloquent climax..." Kirkus Reviews

Review:

"By turns breathtakingly poetic and devastatingly witty, his descriptions of today's urban reality...make the present seem like a forbidding, to-be-avoided future." Donna Seaman, Booklist

Review:

"[A] major dud....DeLillo has chosen to spurn the wonderfully fizzy, tactile prose he once reveled in for the stripped-down, almost abstract language he employed in his 2001 novella, The Body Artist....[A] long day's journey into tedium." Michiko Kakutani, The New York Times

Review:

"DeLillo has chosen an almost cartoonish pop-up narrative....Cosmopolis is not one of DeLillo's best novels, but it is one of his best intentioned and should be widely read, probably twice or more by those who enjoy contemplating life's enigmas." Tom LeClair, Book Magazine

Review:

"[S]hort and tightly focused, indeed almost claustrophobic....Cosmopolis reverts to the standard DeLillo boilerplate, perceptive and funny but also brittle and cold. This...makes Cosmopolis a step backward rather than an artistic advance." Library Journal

Review:

"The dovetailing of these two plots ought to make Cosmopolis suspenseful, but it's not. The novel oozes toward its nonclimax like a vehicle stuck in traffic, an effect DeLillo must have wanted." St. Petersburg Times

Review:

"Cosmopolis may not be the best book that [DeLillo] has written, or is capable of writing, but in these grim days it is probably the best that we can expect." John Banville, Bookforum

Review:

"If abstract musings on financial and technological power thrill you, perhaps you'll be stirred by Cosmopolis. That the novel lacks what Latin Americans call calor humano, or human warmth, will no doubt discourage some readers." Houston Chronicle

Review:

"[De Lillo's] sentences, by now unmistakable, here are meant to suggest profound truths. But in practice they are somewhat bloodless, not unlike Packer himself, whose story is less than a joy to read." Rob Walker, The Washington Post Book World

Review:

"A totalitarian reading experience that clicks by without surprise or spontaneity....Cosmopolis is an intellectual turkey shoot, sending up a succession of fat targets just in time for its author to aim and fire the rounds he loaded before he started writing." Walter Kirn, The New York Times Book Review

Review:

"Some will hate Cosmopolis both for the cold logic of Packer's precipitous fall and for the cool, flat, cynical surface of DeLillo's prose. What they miss is the humor, the play of ideas and DeLillo's incredible ear for American vernacular speech." Portland Oregonian

Review:

"Cosmopolis is a small book, barely more than 200 pages, yet epic in its vision. Nor does it abandon the reader to the detritus of a world without remedy." Baltimore Sun

Review:

"[U]nsurprisingly brilliant....One of the side benefits of the author's Faustianly prodigious verbal facility is that he can unstring us with laughter one minute, paralyze us with horror the next." San Francisco Chronicle

Review:

"DeLillo's fervent intelligence and his fastidious, edgy prose...weave halos of import around every event, however far-fetched and random. But the trouble with a tale where anything can happen is that somehow nothing happens." John Updike, The New Yorker

Synopsis:

“DeLillo’s most affecting novel yet...A dazzling, phosphorescent work of art.”—Michiko Kakutani, The New York Times

“The clearest vision yet of what it felt like to live through that day.” —Malcolm Jones, Newsweek

“A metaphysical ghost story about a woman alone…intimate, spare, exquisite.” —Adam Begley, The New York Times Book Review

“A brilliant new novel....Don DeLillo continues to think about the modern world in language and images as quizzically beautiful as any writer.” — San Francisco Chronicle

About the Author

Don DeLillo is the author of thirteen novels and two plays. He has won the National Book Award, the PEN/Faulkner Award for Fiction, and the Jerusalem Prize.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780743244251
Author:
DeLillo, Don
Publisher:
Scribner Book Company
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
General Fiction
Subject:
General Fiction
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Copyright:
Edition Description:
B102
Publication Date:
April 2004
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
224
Dimensions:
8 x 5.25 in 6.44 oz

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Related Subjects


Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » Sale Books
Fiction and Poetry » Popular Fiction » Suspense

Cosmopolis: A Novel Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$6.50 In Stock
Product details 224 pages Scribner Book Company - English 9780743244251 Reviews:
"Review A Day" by , "Like Underworld, Don DeLillo's new novel is an up-to-the-minute gizmo with a nineteenth-century heart. It tells the story of a day of reckoning, a day in the life of a young billionaire financier named Eric Packer, who begins the book full of postmodern cynicism and Manhattan materialism, and ends it chastened, suddenly penniless, and eager to change his life." (read the entire New Republic review)
"Review" by , "[A] monotone 13th novel....[DeLillo] seems surprisingly disengaged here. His spotlighted New Economy icon, Eric, doesn't work, either as a genius financier...or a thinker....DeLillo is surely an American master, but this time out, he is doodling."
"Review" by , "[B]leakly funny....DeLillo assembles [his] quirky particulars expertly — and he still writes better sentences than any other contemporary author....The tale is ingenious and amusing, and there?s a chilling logic to its eloquent climax..."
"Review" by , "By turns breathtakingly poetic and devastatingly witty, his descriptions of today's urban reality...make the present seem like a forbidding, to-be-avoided future."
"Review" by , "[A] major dud....DeLillo has chosen to spurn the wonderfully fizzy, tactile prose he once reveled in for the stripped-down, almost abstract language he employed in his 2001 novella, The Body Artist....[A] long day's journey into tedium."
"Review" by , "DeLillo has chosen an almost cartoonish pop-up narrative....Cosmopolis is not one of DeLillo's best novels, but it is one of his best intentioned and should be widely read, probably twice or more by those who enjoy contemplating life's enigmas."
"Review" by , "[S]hort and tightly focused, indeed almost claustrophobic....Cosmopolis reverts to the standard DeLillo boilerplate, perceptive and funny but also brittle and cold. This...makes Cosmopolis a step backward rather than an artistic advance."
"Review" by , "The dovetailing of these two plots ought to make Cosmopolis suspenseful, but it's not. The novel oozes toward its nonclimax like a vehicle stuck in traffic, an effect DeLillo must have wanted."
"Review" by , "Cosmopolis may not be the best book that [DeLillo] has written, or is capable of writing, but in these grim days it is probably the best that we can expect."
"Review" by , "If abstract musings on financial and technological power thrill you, perhaps you'll be stirred by Cosmopolis. That the novel lacks what Latin Americans call calor humano, or human warmth, will no doubt discourage some readers."
"Review" by , "[De Lillo's] sentences, by now unmistakable, here are meant to suggest profound truths. But in practice they are somewhat bloodless, not unlike Packer himself, whose story is less than a joy to read."
"Review" by , "A totalitarian reading experience that clicks by without surprise or spontaneity....Cosmopolis is an intellectual turkey shoot, sending up a succession of fat targets just in time for its author to aim and fire the rounds he loaded before he started writing."
"Review" by , "Some will hate Cosmopolis both for the cold logic of Packer's precipitous fall and for the cool, flat, cynical surface of DeLillo's prose. What they miss is the humor, the play of ideas and DeLillo's incredible ear for American vernacular speech."
"Review" by , "Cosmopolis is a small book, barely more than 200 pages, yet epic in its vision. Nor does it abandon the reader to the detritus of a world without remedy."
"Review" by , "[U]nsurprisingly brilliant....One of the side benefits of the author's Faustianly prodigious verbal facility is that he can unstring us with laughter one minute, paralyze us with horror the next."
"Review" by , "DeLillo's fervent intelligence and his fastidious, edgy prose...weave halos of import around every event, however far-fetched and random. But the trouble with a tale where anything can happen is that somehow nothing happens."
"Synopsis" by , “DeLillo’s most affecting novel yet...A dazzling, phosphorescent work of art.”—Michiko Kakutani, The New York Times

“The clearest vision yet of what it felt like to live through that day.” —Malcolm Jones, Newsweek

“A metaphysical ghost story about a woman alone…intimate, spare, exquisite.” —Adam Begley, The New York Times Book Review

“A brilliant new novel....Don DeLillo continues to think about the modern world in language and images as quizzically beautiful as any writer.” — San Francisco Chronicle

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