Tournament of Books 2015
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN a $100 Credit

Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news
for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

Visit our stores


    Recently Viewed clear list


    Original Essays | January 6, 2015

    Matt Burgess: IMG 35 Seconds



    Late at night on September 22, 2014, at a housing project basketball court in Brooklyn, a white cop pushes a black man against a chain link fence.... Continue »

    spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$6.50
Used Hardcover
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Local Warehouse Mathematics- Popular Surveys and Recreational

The Equation That Couldn't Be Solved: How Mathematical Genius Discovered the Language of Symmetry

by

The Equation That Couldn't Be Solved: How Mathematical Genius Discovered the Language of Symmetry Cover

ISBN13: 9780743258203
ISBN10: 0743258207
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
All Product Details

Only 1 left in stock at $6.50!

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

What do the music of J. S. Bach, the basic forces of nature, Rubik's Cube, and the selection of mates have in common? They are all characterized by certain symmetries. Symmetry is the concept that bridges the gap between science and art, between the world of theoretical physics and the everyday world we see around us. Yet the language of symmetry (group theory in mathematics) emerged from a most unlikely source: an equation that couldn't be solved.

Over the millennia, mathematicians solved progressively more difficult algebraic equations until they came to what is known as the quintic equation. For several centuries it resisted solution, until two mathematical prodigies independently discovered that it could not be solved by the usual methods, thereby opening the door to group theory. These young geniuses, a Norwegian named Niels Henrik Abel and a Frenchman named Evariste Galois, both died tragically. Galois, in fact, spent the night before his fatal duel (at the age of twenty) scribbling another brief summary of his proof, at one point writing in the margin of his notebook I have no time.

The story of the equation that couldn't be solved is a story of brilliant mathematicians and a fascinating account of how mathematics illuminates a wide variety of disciplines. In this lively, engaging book, Mario Livio shows in an easily accessible way how group theory explains the symmetry and order of both the natural and the human-made worlds.

Review:

"The generously illustrated text has many visual aids and photos, as well as detailed chapter notes with lists of recommended literature sources and a Galois family tree." Library Journal

Review:

"[An] entertaining exploration of how the laws of symmetry have shaped our chaotic little world, and how they inform our appreciation of art and music." Kirkus Reviews

Review:

"Mario Livio has done a marvelous job....This is one of the best books about mathematics I have ever read." Amir D. Aczel, author of Chance: A Guide to Gambling, Love, the Stock Market, and Just About Everything Else and Fermat's Last Theorem: Unlocking the Secret of an Ancient Mathematical Problem

Review:

"[F]ascinating examples of how mathematics illuminates a wide swath of our world." Scientific American

Synopsis:

From the author of the bestseller The Golden Ratio comes the story of the 4,000-year-long mathematical quest that uncovered the laws of symmetry in nature and the arts.

Synopsis:

What do the music of J. S. Bach, the basic forces of nature, Rubik's Cube, and the selection of mates have in common? They are all characterized by certain symmetries. Symmetry is the concept that bridges the gap between science and art, between the world of theoretical physics and the everyday world we see around us. Yet the "language" of symmetry--group theory in mathematics--emerged from a most unlikely source: an equation that couldn't be solved.

Over the millennia, mathematicians solved progressively more difficult algebraic equations until they came to what is known as the quintic equation. For several centuries it resisted solution, until two mathematical prodigies independently discovered that it could not be solved by the usual methods, thereby opening the door to group theory. These young geniuses, a Norwegian named Niels Henrik Abel and a Frenchman named Evariste Galois, both died tragically. Galois, in fact, spent the night before his fatal duel (at the age of twenty) scribbling another brief summary of his proof, at one point writing in the margin of his notebook "I have no time."

The story of the equation that couldn't be solved is a story of brilliant mathematicians and a fascinating account of how mathematics illuminates a wide variety of disciplines. In this lively, engaging book, Mario Livio shows in an easily accessible way how group theory explains the symmetry and order of both the natural and the human-made worlds.

About the Author

Mario Livio, Ph.D., is head of the science division at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which conducts the scientific program of the Hubble Space Telescope. He is recognized as a world expert on topics ranging from dramatic explosions like novae, supernovae, and gamma-ray bursts to compact astronomical objects like white dwarfs, neutron stars, and black holes. He has published over 300 scientific papers and has lectured to the public about discoveries in astronomy and cosmology all across the globe.

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

saiyanreader, December 29, 2009 (view all comments by saiyanreader)
If you're interested in math theory this may be a perfect book to read. I was able to learn the beauty and elegance of mathematics, which drew me to like mathematics even more. Through there are some vague and hard to understand sections, overall, I found this to be very well written. It was a great read.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No

Product Details

ISBN:
9780743258203
Subtitle:
How Mathematical Genius Discovered the Language of Symmetry
Author:
Livio, Mario
Publisher:
Simon & Schuster
Subject:
History
Subject:
Mathematics
Subject:
History -- Philosophy.
Subject:
General Mathematics
Subject:
Group Theory
Copyright:
Publication Date:
September 2005
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
368
Dimensions:
9.50x6.42x.93 in. 1.31 lbs.

Other books you might like

  1. The Music of the Primes: Searching...
    Used Trade Paper $7.95
  2. The Art of the Infinite: The... Used Hardcover $3.50
  3. Flatland: A Romance of Many...
    Used Trade Paper $1.95
  4. Boundary & Eigenvalue Problems in... Used Hardcover $11.95
  5. Dr. Euler's Fabulous Formula: Cures... Used Hardcover $11.95
  6. God Created the Integers: The... Sale Trade Paper $12.98

Related Subjects

Science and Mathematics » Mathematics » History
Science and Mathematics » Mathematics » Popular Surveys and Recreational

The Equation That Couldn't Be Solved: How Mathematical Genius Discovered the Language of Symmetry Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$6.50 In Stock
Product details 368 pages Simon & Schuster - English 9780743258203 Reviews:
"Review" by , "The generously illustrated text has many visual aids and photos, as well as detailed chapter notes with lists of recommended literature sources and a Galois family tree."
"Review" by , "[An] entertaining exploration of how the laws of symmetry have shaped our chaotic little world, and how they inform our appreciation of art and music."
"Review" by , "Mario Livio has done a marvelous job....This is one of the best books about mathematics I have ever read." Amir D. Aczel, author of Chance: A Guide to Gambling, Love, the Stock Market, and Just About Everything Else and Fermat's Last Theorem: Unlocking the Secret of an Ancient Mathematical Problem
"Review" by , "[F]ascinating examples of how mathematics illuminates a wide swath of our world."
"Synopsis" by , From the author of the bestseller The Golden Ratio comes the story of the 4,000-year-long mathematical quest that uncovered the laws of symmetry in nature and the arts.
"Synopsis" by , What do the music of J. S. Bach, the basic forces of nature, Rubik's Cube, and the selection of mates have in common? They are all characterized by certain symmetries. Symmetry is the concept that bridges the gap between science and art, between the world of theoretical physics and the everyday world we see around us. Yet the "language" of symmetry--group theory in mathematics--emerged from a most unlikely source: an equation that couldn't be solved.

Over the millennia, mathematicians solved progressively more difficult algebraic equations until they came to what is known as the quintic equation. For several centuries it resisted solution, until two mathematical prodigies independently discovered that it could not be solved by the usual methods, thereby opening the door to group theory. These young geniuses, a Norwegian named Niels Henrik Abel and a Frenchman named Evariste Galois, both died tragically. Galois, in fact, spent the night before his fatal duel (at the age of twenty) scribbling another brief summary of his proof, at one point writing in the margin of his notebook "I have no time."

The story of the equation that couldn't be solved is a story of brilliant mathematicians and a fascinating account of how mathematics illuminates a wide variety of disciplines. In this lively, engaging book, Mario Livio shows in an easily accessible way how group theory explains the symmetry and order of both the natural and the human-made worlds.

spacer
spacer
  • back to top

FOLLOW US ON...

     
Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.