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6 Remote Warehouse Science Fiction and Fantasy- Fantasy
1 Remote Warehouse Science Fiction and Fantasy- Fantasy

Who Fears Death

by

Who Fears Death Cover

ISBN13: 9780756406172
ISBN10: 075640617x
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

International award-winning Nnedi Okorafor enters the world of magical realist literature with a powerful story of genocide in the far future and the woman who reshapes her world.

In a post-apocalyptic Africa, the world has changed in many ways, yet in one region genocide between tribes still bloodies the land. A woman who has survived the annihilation of her village and a terrible rape by an enemy general wanders into the desert hoping to die. Instead, she gives birth to an angry baby girl with hair and skin the color of sand. Gripped by the certainty that her daughter is different--special--she names her Onyesonwu, which means "Who fears death?" in an ancient language. It doesn't take long for Onye to understand that she is physically and socially marked by the circumstances of her violent conception.

She is Ewu--a child of rape who is expected to live a life of violence, a half-breed rejected by both tribes. But Onye is not the average Ewu. Even as a child, she manifests the beginnings of a remarkable and unique magic. As she grows, so do her abilities, and during an inadvertent visit to the spirit realm she learns something terrifying: Someone powerful is trying to kill her.

Desperate to elude her would-be murderer and to understand her own nature, she embarks on a journey in which she grapples with nature, tradition, history, true love, and the spiritual mysteries of her culture, and ultimately teaches her why she was given the name she bears: Who Fears Death.

Review:

"Well-known for young adult novels (The Shadow Speaks; Zahrah the Windseeker), Okorafor sets this emotionally fraught tale in postapocalyptic Saharan Africa. The young sorceress Onyesonwu — whose name means 'Who fears death?' — was born Ewu, bearing a mixture of her mother's features and those of the man who raped her mother and left her for dead in the desert. As Onyesonwu grows into her powers, it becomes clear that her fate is mingled with the fate of her people, the oppressed Okeke, and that to achieve her destiny, she must die. Okorafor examines a host of evils in her chillingly realistic tale — gender and racial inequality share top billing, along with female genital mutilation and complacency in the face of destructive tradition — and winds these disparate concepts together into a fantastical, magical blend of grand storytelling. (June)" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Synopsis:

An award-winning literary author ("The Shadow Speaker") presents her first foray into supernatural fantasy with a novel of post-apocalyptic Africa.

Synopsis:

The critically-acclaimed novel-now in paperback.

In a far-future, post-apocalyptic Saharan Africa, genocide plagues one region. When the only surviving member of a slain village is brutally raped, she manages to escape, wandering farther into the desert. She gives birth to a baby girl with hair and skin the color of sand, and instinctively knows her daughter is different. She names her daughter Onyesonwu, which means "Who Fears Death?" in an ancient African tongue.

Reared under the tutelege of a mysterious and traditional shaman, Onyesonwu discovers she possesses a remarkable and unique magic. The journey to fulfill her destiny will force her to confront nature, tradition, history, the spiritual mysteries of her culture, and eventually to learn why she was given the unusual name she bears: Who Fears Death?

Synopsis:

Read Nnedi Okorafor's posts on the Penguin Blog.

An award-winning literary author presents her first foray into supernatural fantasy with a novel of post- apocalyptic Africa.

In a far future, post-nuclear-holocaust Africa, genocide plagues one region. The aggressors, the Nuru, have decided to follow the Great Book and exterminate the Okeke. But when the only surviving member of a slain Okeke village is brutally raped, she manages to escape, wandering farther into the desert. She gives birth to a baby girl with hair and skin the color of sand and instinctively knows that her daughter is different. She names her daughter Onyesonwu, which means "Who Fears Death?" in an ancient African tongue.

Reared under the tutelage of a mysterious and traditional shaman, Onyesonwu discovers her magical destiny-to end the genocide of her people. The journey to fulfill her destiny will force her to grapple with nature, tradition, history, true love, the spiritual mysteries of her culture-and eventually death itself.

About the Author

Nnedi Okorafor was born in the United States to two Igbo (Nigerian) immigrant parents. She holds a PhD in English and is a professor of creative writing at Chicago State University. She has been the winner of many awards for her short stories and

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 3 comments:

Kathleen Gabriel, January 3, 2011 (view all comments by Kathleen Gabriel)
This is the best fantasy book I've read that was published in 2010. Its complexity and tension kept me reading far into the night. Nnedi Okorafor proves in this work that she can write for adults--her success as a young adult author was established with The Shadow Speaker and Zahrah the Windseeker. Like them, Who Fears Death draws heavily on Ms. Okorafor's Nigerian background and research while creating a unique fantasy world. The unusual setting and strong female characters bring the reader into a world that's harsh and dark, but also has beauty and hope.
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dforres1, January 2, 2011 (view all comments by dforres1)
Set in post-apocalyptic Africa, this is the story of a girl named Onyesonwu, meaning "Who Fears Death," who grows up to become a powerful sorceress. There are two tribes. Onyesonwu is Ewu, which means mixed-race; blood of both tribes. Sandy-skinned and biracial, Ewus are shunned by both tribes. Yet she does not let it hold her back, and she meets another person just like herself; Mwita, another Ewu.

She is destined to go on a quest to end the genocide of her people. While doing so, she also exacts revenge for her mother, having been raped by the enemy tribe's general, who is Onyesonwu's biological father. She does a lot of growing up before the book is over, and shows that she truly does not fear death.

The cover of Who Fears Death is the first thing that caught my attention. It is composed of warm colors that stand out, and the figure with the ethereal wings is intriguing. It's definitely a neat cover.

The next thing I noticed was that it had a quote from Patrick Rothfuss on the back:

"Nnedi Okorafor's got the cure for what ails you. Her books are fresh, original, and smart. We need more writers like her."

So then, enticed, I read the first chapter, and I was pleasantly surprised at how readable the prose was. It's the kind of writing I like.

The weightiness of some of the subject matter - rape, violence, and female circumcision - are the only things that are intimidating about it. So the book is definitely not for everyone.

However, I really enjoyed it! There is a lot to like about this book:

-The writing style. It's really very succinctly written. Short sentences always make it easier for me to read. (If this is what Pat's talking about in his blurb, then I concur.)
-The magic. It's really cool that she can turn into a bird. There are other surprises as well!
-It's in first person, which I like.
-The characters. There is a lot to like about them. They don't overshadow Onye, but they are important. Without them, she would go on her journey alone. With that said, they don't seem bound to her either.

Highly recommended!
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Lynette, January 1, 2011 (view all comments by Lynette)
This is one of the most powerful, creative books I have ever read. Intense, mythic, brutal and beautiful, it moves from deeply personal anguish and courage to the transformation of devastation into a new creation. I cannot say more - read it!
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(1 of 2 readers found this comment helpful)
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780756406172
Author:
Okorafor, Nnedi
Publisher:
Daw Books
Subject:
Fantasy - General
Subject:
Science Fiction and Fantasy-Fantasy
Edition Description:
Mass market paperback
Publication Date:
20100631
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
from 12
Language:
English
Pages:
304
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in 1 lb
Age Level:
17-17

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Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
Fiction and Poetry » Science Fiction and Fantasy » A to Z
Fiction and Poetry » Science Fiction and Fantasy » Fantasy » General

Who Fears Death New Hardcover
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Product details 304 pages Daw Books - English 9780756406172 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Well-known for young adult novels (The Shadow Speaks; Zahrah the Windseeker), Okorafor sets this emotionally fraught tale in postapocalyptic Saharan Africa. The young sorceress Onyesonwu — whose name means 'Who fears death?' — was born Ewu, bearing a mixture of her mother's features and those of the man who raped her mother and left her for dead in the desert. As Onyesonwu grows into her powers, it becomes clear that her fate is mingled with the fate of her people, the oppressed Okeke, and that to achieve her destiny, she must die. Okorafor examines a host of evils in her chillingly realistic tale — gender and racial inequality share top billing, along with female genital mutilation and complacency in the face of destructive tradition — and winds these disparate concepts together into a fantastical, magical blend of grand storytelling. (June)" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by , An award-winning literary author ("The Shadow Speaker") presents her first foray into supernatural fantasy with a novel of post-apocalyptic Africa.
"Synopsis" by ,
The critically-acclaimed novel-now in paperback.

In a far-future, post-apocalyptic Saharan Africa, genocide plagues one region. When the only surviving member of a slain village is brutally raped, she manages to escape, wandering farther into the desert. She gives birth to a baby girl with hair and skin the color of sand, and instinctively knows her daughter is different. She names her daughter Onyesonwu, which means "Who Fears Death?" in an ancient African tongue.

Reared under the tutelege of a mysterious and traditional shaman, Onyesonwu discovers she possesses a remarkable and unique magic. The journey to fulfill her destiny will force her to confront nature, tradition, history, the spiritual mysteries of her culture, and eventually to learn why she was given the unusual name she bears: Who Fears Death?

"Synopsis" by ,
Read Nnedi Okorafor's posts on the Penguin Blog.

An award-winning literary author presents her first foray into supernatural fantasy with a novel of post- apocalyptic Africa.

In a far future, post-nuclear-holocaust Africa, genocide plagues one region. The aggressors, the Nuru, have decided to follow the Great Book and exterminate the Okeke. But when the only surviving member of a slain Okeke village is brutally raped, she manages to escape, wandering farther into the desert. She gives birth to a baby girl with hair and skin the color of sand and instinctively knows that her daughter is different. She names her daughter Onyesonwu, which means "Who Fears Death?" in an ancient African tongue.

Reared under the tutelage of a mysterious and traditional shaman, Onyesonwu discovers her magical destiny-to end the genocide of her people. The journey to fulfill her destiny will force her to grapple with nature, tradition, history, true love, the spiritual mysteries of her culture-and eventually death itself.

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