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Sundays with Von Dutch

Sundays with Von Dutch Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Richard Karl Koch began his architecture career while still a university student. He abruptly transitioned to photography and spent the next 12 years as a successful architecture and lifestyle photographer. While shooting a story about the Santa Monica Pier, he decided to create the West Wind Sailing Club and School there in the summer of 1975. For the next five years he was involved with West Wind and with the Pier Promotion Program. He also ran (unsuccessfully) for Santa Monica City Council on his own “Save the Pier” platform, and following a major storm that washed away his sailboat fleet and business premises, he became involved in two lengthy real estate acquisitions. In 1981 Richard designed the “Wonderboom,” a conditioning device for windsurfers that he patented and manufactured, marketed, and sold for five-plus years. In 1991 he returned to the less physically demanding practice of studio photography. Medical problems forced him to retire in 1996. As of this publication, he was struggling to convince cranky contractors to complete the small unfinished house he purchased in 2005 near the foot of Bartlett Mountain in the high-desert community of Joshua Tree, California, also  known as “The New Bohemia” for its thriving artist community. His plans—if the house is ever finished—are to involve himself in his studio and in the activities of the Morongo Basin Cultural Arts Council, and to photograph the wildlife on his 5-acre front yard overlooking the basin. He shares his life with his much-loved and faithful companion, Buddy the Lightning Dog.

Tony Thacker is the executive director of the Wally Parks National Hot Rod Association Motorsports Museum and the author and co-author of several books on hot rods and customs, including Hot Rods by Ed "Big Daddy" Roth (Motorbooks, 1995), SO-CAL Speed Shop (Motorbooks, 2005), and ’32 Ford Deuce (Motorbooks, 2007).

 

Synopsis:

Over 150 photographs from 1970 offer a rare look into the “missing years” in the story of Von Dutch, the soul of hot rod culture.

Synopsis:

A famously crazed presence in the hot rod and kustom culture movement of the 1950s and early 1960s, Kenneth “Von Dutch” Howard spent more than a decade missing from the scene he helped create. It was during that time, on four consecutive Sundays in the spring of 1970, that Richard Karl Koch visited Von Dutch at his home in Calabasas, California, north of L.A. There, he photographed the father of modern pinstriping and other gonzo weirdness for a cover story in the Los Angeles Times’ Sunday supplement, West magazine. Koch’s candid photos from those four afternoons, the majority of which are published here for the first time, provide an intensely personal and atypical look at Dutch’s “missing years.”

Koch’s photography subverts the prevailing recollections of the man as an ill-tempered, mean-spirited genius, showing instead an enigmatic icon during a rare period of relative domestic bliss in an otherwise tempestuous life. Instead, readers witness a freewheeling goof, tooling around Calabasas with his wife Sheila in the “antique” car he built for friend Steve McQueen’s 1969 film The Reivers, fabricating a handgun in his famous GM bus-turned-machine-shop, and pinstriping cars, motorcycles, and Koch’s Rand McNally moon globe before crowds of admiring gearheads and children, including his two daughters.

Accompanied by the original May 24, 1970, Tom Nolan­–penned West article, as well as by a capsule history of Dutch’s career written by National Hot Rod Association Motorsports Museum Executive Director Tony Thacker especially for this volume, Koch’s photography comprises a fascinating yet seldom-explored chapter in the Von Dutch legend.

Synopsis:

Created by Richard Karl Koch over the course of four Sundays in 1970 for the L.A. Times supplement West magazine, this collection of intensely personal photography subverts today’s prevalent recollections of Kenneth “Von Dutch” Howard, capturing him during a rare period of relative domestic bliss. Commissioned on the premise that many believed Von Dutch—the “father of modern pinstriping” and a guiding light in the creation of hot rod culture—was dead, Koch’s photography and the accompanying West article, “Make Me a Machine That Will Be a Piece of Art” by Tom Nolan, proved that Dutch was as prolific and creative as ever. Koch’s photographs, the vast majority of them seen here in print for the first time, are accompanied by the original West article and by a history of Dutch’s work, written for this volume by Tony Thacker, executive director of the Wally Parks NHRA Motorsports Museum. The resulting book is a must-have for kustom-culture aficionados and for those not yet familiar with a creative giant.

 

 

About the Author

Richard Karl Koch began his architecture career while still a university student. He abruptly transitioned to photography and spent the next 12 years as a successful architecture and lifestyle photographer. While shooting a story about the Santa Monica Pier, he decided to create the West Wind Sailing Club and School there in the summer of 1975. For the next five years he was involved with West Wind and with the Pier Promotion Program. He also ran (unsuccessfully) for Santa Monica City Council on his own \u201cSave the Pier\u201d platform, and following a major storm that washed away his sailboat fleet and business premises, he became involved in two lengthy real estate acquisitions. In 1981 Richard designed the \u201cWonderboom,\u201d a conditioning device for windsurfers that he patented and manufactured, marketed, and sold for five-plus years. In 1991 he returned to the less physically demanding practice of studio photography. Medical problems forced him to retire in 1996.

Table of Contents

Contents

Acknowledgments

Introduction: Von Dutch Is Not Dead: Calabasas, 1970

            By Richard Karl Koch

Chapter 1: “Glad To Be Back Home”

Chapter 2: Cool Fine Lines

Chapter 3: On the Bus

Chapter 4: Make Me a Machine

Chapter 5: The Man and the Moon

Selected Bibliography

Index

 

Product Details

ISBN:
9780760326268
Publisher:
Motorbooks
Subject:
General
Photographer:
Koch, Richard Karl
Author:
Koch, Richard Karl
Author:
Thacker, Tony
Subject:
Automobiles
Subject:
Automotive - Domestic - Pictorial
Subject:
Decoration
Subject:
Automotive - History
Subject:
Automotive - Pictorial
Subject:
Automobiles -- Decoration.
Subject:
Dutch, Von
Subject:
Automotive - Domestic - History
Edition Description:
First
Publication Date:
20070415
Binding:
Paperback
Language:
English
Illustrations:
171 Color & 18 B&W Photos
Pages:
128
Dimensions:
9 x 9 x 0.25 in 1.13 lb

Related Subjects

Transportation » Automotive » Customizing and Painting
Transportation » Automotive » General
Transportation » Automotive » Restoration

Sundays with Von Dutch
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Product details 128 pages Motorbooks International - English 9780760326268 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,

Over 150 photographs from 1970 offer a rare look into the “missing years” in the story of Von Dutch, the soul of hot rod culture.

"Synopsis" by ,

A famously crazed presence in the hot rod and kustom culture movement of the 1950s and early 1960s, Kenneth “Von Dutch” Howard spent more than a decade missing from the scene he helped create. It was during that time, on four consecutive Sundays in the spring of 1970, that Richard Karl Koch visited Von Dutch at his home in Calabasas, California, north of L.A. There, he photographed the father of modern pinstriping and other gonzo weirdness for a cover story in the Los Angeles Times’ Sunday supplement, West magazine. Koch’s candid photos from those four afternoons, the majority of which are published here for the first time, provide an intensely personal and atypical look at Dutch’s “missing years.”

Koch’s photography subverts the prevailing recollections of the man as an ill-tempered, mean-spirited genius, showing instead an enigmatic icon during a rare period of relative domestic bliss in an otherwise tempestuous life. Instead, readers witness a freewheeling goof, tooling around Calabasas with his wife Sheila in the “antique” car he built for friend Steve McQueen’s 1969 film The Reivers, fabricating a handgun in his famous GM bus-turned-machine-shop, and pinstriping cars, motorcycles, and Koch’s Rand McNally moon globe before crowds of admiring gearheads and children, including his two daughters.

Accompanied by the original May 24, 1970, Tom Nolan­–penned West article, as well as by a capsule history of Dutch’s career written by National Hot Rod Association Motorsports Museum Executive Director Tony Thacker especially for this volume, Koch’s photography comprises a fascinating yet seldom-explored chapter in the Von Dutch legend.

"Synopsis" by ,

Created by Richard Karl Koch over the course of four Sundays in 1970 for the L.A. Times supplement West magazine, this collection of intensely personal photography subverts today’s prevalent recollections of Kenneth “Von Dutch” Howard, capturing him during a rare period of relative domestic bliss. Commissioned on the premise that many believed Von Dutch—the “father of modern pinstriping” and a guiding light in the creation of hot rod culture—was dead, Koch’s photography and the accompanying West article, “Make Me a Machine That Will Be a Piece of Art” by Tom Nolan, proved that Dutch was as prolific and creative as ever. Koch’s photographs, the vast majority of them seen here in print for the first time, are accompanied by the original West article and by a history of Dutch’s work, written for this volume by Tony Thacker, executive director of the Wally Parks NHRA Motorsports Museum. The resulting book is a must-have for kustom-culture aficionados and for those not yet familiar with a creative giant.

 

 

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