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Survive the Bomb: The Radioactive Citizen's Guide to Nuclear Survival

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Survive the Bomb: The Radioactive Citizen's Guide to Nuclear Survival Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Attention, citizens and fellow travelers of the Cold War: Survive the Bomb is your family’s ultimate fallout shelter companion. Keep this book at the ready next to the emergency drinking water and vacuum-packed canned meats and vegetables for that moment when the saber-rattling between the world’s superpowers turns Atomic.
Here are all the tips and information you’ll need to keep your family safe and secure:
· A convenient set of Civil Defense carrying cards for your wallet or purse
· Steps for the home handyman toward building a well-furnished fallout shelter
· How to convert your home’s snack bar into a cozy secondary shelter
· A checklist of items you’ll need close at hand while awaiting the “all-clear” message from local authorities
· An Operation Survival! comic, including a crossword puzzle and quiz for the kids
· Revealing studies, reports, and recommendations to the United States Congress and President
· Wargame scenarios, aftermath descriptions, and casualty estimates at various distances from a nuclear blast
· An introduction and commentaries by Cold War historian Eric G. Swedin
Be alert and be prepared. Don’t let a little thing like an atomic particle spoil your day.

Synopsis:

"Thermonuclear War Declassified" gives modern readers the experience felt by those who lived under a nuclear threat during the height of the Cold War. It draws on numerous authentic documents, many of them declassified only after the fall of the Soviet Union. It comes in an attractive package hearkening back to a frightening era of fallout shelters, attack warning signals, school "duck-and-cover" drills, the Cuban Missile Crisis, and the pop culture "fallout" from growing up in the shadow of The Bomb. On the surface, "Thermonuclear War Declassified" appears to be a practical and useful manual for surviving a nuclear war. It contains "helpful hints" from the government designed to make the civilian population feel more secure in the case of the ultimate emergency. In hindsight, the advice is often so preposterous it is both laugh-out-loud funny and scary at the same time.

Synopsis:

The launch of Russia’s Sputnik satellite in 1957 began an era where American citizens were haunted by fears of annihilation. Baby Boomers will remember Bert the Turtle, who instructed them how to “duck and cover.” Survive the Bomb documents other U.S. government efforts to calm the collective psyche with nuclear survival handouts.
 
These cheerful and naïve representations unintentionally inspired countless schoolchildren to question authority at an early age. This strange era reached its peak in 1962 with the Cuban Missile Crisis, lasting at least until the fall of the Berlin Wall. The nightmare still lingers today with the terrorist threat of dirty bombs and efforts by countries like Iran and North Korea to build their own nuclear arsenals.
 
In addition to Civil Defense brochures and pamphlets from the period, Survive the Bomb includes:
 
·      Aftermath descriptions and casualty estimates at various distances from a nuclear blast
·      Civil Defense reports and recommendations to the United States Congress and President
·      Declassified nuclear wargame scenarios where the Department of Defense imagined the unimaginable
·      An introduction and commentaries by Cold War historian Eric G. Swedin
 

 

About the Author

Eric G. Swedin is an associate professor at Weber State University and the author of five books, including When Angels Wept: A What-If History of the Cuban Missile Crisis. He lives near Ogden, Utah.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780760340318
Author:
Swedin, Eric G.
Publisher:
Zenith Press
Subject:
Military - Nuclear Warfare
Subject:
Military - Weapons
Subject:
Atomic
Subject:
Fallout
Subject:
Bomb shelters
Edition Description:
First
Publication Date:
20110531
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
80 b/w photos
Pages:
192
Dimensions:
7.75 x 5.25 in

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Military » Guides and Manuals
History and Social Science » Military » US Military » General
History and Social Science » Military » Weapons » General
History and Social Science » Politics » United States » Foreign Policy
History and Social Science » Social Science » Disasters and Disaster Relief
Hobbies, Crafts, and Leisure » Games » General
Reference » General
Sports and Outdoors » Outdoors » Lore and Survival
Sports and Outdoors » Outdoors » Survival

Survive the Bomb: The Radioactive Citizen's Guide to Nuclear Survival New Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$17.00 Backorder
Product details 192 pages Zenith Press - English 9780760340318 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , "Thermonuclear War Declassified" gives modern readers the experience felt by those who lived under a nuclear threat during the height of the Cold War. It draws on numerous authentic documents, many of them declassified only after the fall of the Soviet Union. It comes in an attractive package hearkening back to a frightening era of fallout shelters, attack warning signals, school "duck-and-cover" drills, the Cuban Missile Crisis, and the pop culture "fallout" from growing up in the shadow of The Bomb. On the surface, "Thermonuclear War Declassified" appears to be a practical and useful manual for surviving a nuclear war. It contains "helpful hints" from the government designed to make the civilian population feel more secure in the case of the ultimate emergency. In hindsight, the advice is often so preposterous it is both laugh-out-loud funny and scary at the same time.

"Synopsis" by ,
The launch of Russia’s Sputnik satellite in 1957 began an era where American citizens were haunted by fears of annihilation. Baby Boomers will remember Bert the Turtle, who instructed them how to “duck and cover.” Survive the Bomb documents other U.S. government efforts to calm the collective psyche with nuclear survival handouts.
 
These cheerful and naïve representations unintentionally inspired countless schoolchildren to question authority at an early age. This strange era reached its peak in 1962 with the Cuban Missile Crisis, lasting at least until the fall of the Berlin Wall. The nightmare still lingers today with the terrorist threat of dirty bombs and efforts by countries like Iran and North Korea to build their own nuclear arsenals.
 
In addition to Civil Defense brochures and pamphlets from the period, Survive the Bomb includes:
 
·      Aftermath descriptions and casualty estimates at various distances from a nuclear blast
·      Civil Defense reports and recommendations to the United States Congress and President
·      Declassified nuclear wargame scenarios where the Department of Defense imagined the unimaginable
·      An introduction and commentaries by Cold War historian Eric G. Swedin
 

 

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