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Yellow Star (06 Edition)

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Yellow Star (06 Edition) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Please note that used books may not include additional media (study guides, CDs, DVDs, solutions manuals, etc.) as described in the publisher comments.

Review:

"In February 1940, four-and-half-year-old Syvia (later Sylvia) Perlmutter, her mother, father and 12-year-old sister, Dora, were among the first of more than 250,000 Jews to be forced into Poland's Lodz Ghetto. When the Russians liberated the ghetto on January 19, 1945, the Perlmutters were among only 800 people left alive; Syvia, 'one day shy of ten years old,' was one of just 12 children to survive the ordeal. The novel is filled with searing incidents of cruelty and deprivation, love, luck and resilience. But what sets it apart is the lyricism of the narrative, and Syvia's credible childlike voice, maturing with each chapter, as she gains further understanding of the events around her. Roy, who is Syvia's niece, tells her aunt's story in first-person free verse. 'February 1940' begins: 'I am walking/ into the ghetto./ My sister holds my hand/ so that I don't/ get lost/ or trampled/ by the crowd of people/ wearing yellow stars,/ carrying possessions,/ moving into the ghetto.' The rhythms, repetitions and the space around each verse enable readers to take in the experience of an ordinary child caught up in incomprehensible events: 'I could be taken away/ on a train,/ .../ and delivered to Germans/ who say that nothing belongs to Jewish people any-/ more./ Not even their own children.' Nearly every detail — a pear Syvia bravely plucks from a tree in the ghetto, a rag doll she makes when her family must sell her own beloved doll — underscores the wedded paradox of hope and fear, joy and pain. Ages 10-up." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Product Details

ISBN:
9780761452775
Author:
Roy, Jennifer
Publisher:
Cavendish Square Publishing
Subject:
General
Subject:
Family life
Subject:
Jews
Subject:
Poland History Occupation, 1939-1945.
Subject:
Jews -- Poland.
Subject:
Children s-General
Publication Date:
20060431
Binding:
Hardcover
Language:
English
Pages:
227
Dimensions:
7.23x5.34x.89 in. .70 lbs.
Age Level:
08-12

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Related Subjects

Children's » General
Children's » Historical Fiction » Holocaust
Young Adult » General
Young Adult » Nonfiction » Biographies

Yellow Star (06 Edition) Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$9.00 In Stock
Product details 227 pages Marshall Cavendish Children's Books - English 9780761452775 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "In February 1940, four-and-half-year-old Syvia (later Sylvia) Perlmutter, her mother, father and 12-year-old sister, Dora, were among the first of more than 250,000 Jews to be forced into Poland's Lodz Ghetto. When the Russians liberated the ghetto on January 19, 1945, the Perlmutters were among only 800 people left alive; Syvia, 'one day shy of ten years old,' was one of just 12 children to survive the ordeal. The novel is filled with searing incidents of cruelty and deprivation, love, luck and resilience. But what sets it apart is the lyricism of the narrative, and Syvia's credible childlike voice, maturing with each chapter, as she gains further understanding of the events around her. Roy, who is Syvia's niece, tells her aunt's story in first-person free verse. 'February 1940' begins: 'I am walking/ into the ghetto./ My sister holds my hand/ so that I don't/ get lost/ or trampled/ by the crowd of people/ wearing yellow stars,/ carrying possessions,/ moving into the ghetto.' The rhythms, repetitions and the space around each verse enable readers to take in the experience of an ordinary child caught up in incomprehensible events: 'I could be taken away/ on a train,/ .../ and delivered to Germans/ who say that nothing belongs to Jewish people any-/ more./ Not even their own children.' Nearly every detail — a pear Syvia bravely plucks from a tree in the ghetto, a rag doll she makes when her family must sell her own beloved doll — underscores the wedded paradox of hope and fear, joy and pain. Ages 10-up." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
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