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1 Burnside Science Fiction and Fantasy- A to Z

Axis

by

Axis Cover

ISBN13: 9780765309396
ISBN10: 0765309394
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Wildly praised by readers and critics alike, Robert Charles Wilson's Spin won science fiction's highest honor, the Hugo Award for Best Novel.

Now, in Spin's direct sequel, Wilson takes us to the "world next door" — the planet engineered by the mysterious Hypotheticals to support human life, and connected to Earth by way of the Arch that towers hundreds of miles over the Indian Ocean. Humans are colonizing this new world — and, predictably, fiercely exploiting its resources, chiefly large deposits of oil in the western deserts of the continent of Equatoria.

Lise Adams is a young woman attempting to uncover the mystery of her father's disappearance ten years earlier. Turk Findley is an ex-sailor and sometimes-drifter. They come together when an infall of cometary dust seeds the planet with tiny remnant Hypothetical machines. Soon, this seemingly hospitable world will become very alien indeed — as the nature of time is once again twisted, by entities unknown.

Review:

"In this outstanding sequel to Wilson's Hugo-winning Spin (2005), we are taken to the mysterious planet Equatoria, a world apparently engineered for humanity by the inscrutable machine intelligences known as the Hypotheticals. Turk Findley, a man with a criminal past, runs an aeronautical charter service on the newly settled planet. Lise Adams, who hires Turk, is a would-be journalist searching for her vanished father, a scientist obsessed with the Hypotheticals and their illegal life extension technology. Meanwhile, young Isaac, genetically manipulated by rogue scientists so that he may become a conduit between humanity and the AIs, is coming of age, and something enormous and unknown is assembling itself far underground. The various science and thriller plot elements are successful, but this is first and foremost a novel of character. Turk and Lise, who might well be played by Bogart and Bacall, are powerfully drawn protagonists, and their strong presence in the novel makes the wonders provided all the more satisfying. Those unfamiliar with Spin may flounder a bit, but Wilson's fans will be ecstatic. (Sept.)" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"This absolutely worthy, abundantly marvelous sequel to Spin conjures humanity after an event so strange it's almost unimaginable." Booklist

Review:

"This far-future odyssey, with its life-sized characters and unintelligible aliens, embellishes much while explaining little and ends up equally engrossing and exasperating." Kirkus Reviews

Review:

"This sequel...elaborates on strange new sciences and old dangers in an adventure solidly grounded in science. Intriguing characters and strong storytelling make this an excellent choice for most sf collections." Library Journal

Review:

"[A]n exemplary sequel....What is remarkable about Axis is that, though very little actually happens over its moderate length...there is a pleasure in taking it kind of easy in Equatoria that maybe only an author as deeply and securely professional as Wilson could convey." John Clute, SciFi.com

Review:

"Wilson has chosen depth over expansion, and the result is arguably what a middle novel in a trilogy should be, adding weight and density to the narrative instead of merely offering a place-holding intermezzo for the fireworks to come." Gary K. Wolfe, Locus Magazine

Review:

"To reassure the science-challenged reader, this book is not laden with technology. It is a rich tale with well-developed characters that touches on some of the basic philosophical questions of humans. Just read Spin first." Curled Up with a Good Book

Synopsis:

The sequel to the Hugo Award-winning SF epic Spin.

Synopsis:

In the sequel to the Hugo Award-winning Spin, Wilson takes readers to the "world next door" — the planet engineered by the mysterious Hypotheticals to support human life. But as humans colonize this new world they, predictably, fiercely exploit its resources.

Synopsis:

The sequel to the Hugo Award-winning SF epic Spin

Synopsis:

The sequel to the Hugo Award-winning SF epic Spin.

Synopsis:

Wildly praised by readers and critics alike, Robert Charles Wilson's Spin won science fiction's highest honor, the Hugo Award for Best Novel.

 

Now, in Spin's direct sequel, Wilson takes us to the "world next door"--the planet engineered by the mysterious Hypotheticals to support human life, and connected to Earth by way of the Arch that towers hundreds of miles over the Indian Ocean. Humans are colonizing this new world--and, predictably, fiercely exploiting its resources, chiefly large deposits of oil in the western deserts of the continent of Equatoria.

 

Lise Adams is a young woman attempting to uncover the mystery of her father's disappearance ten years earlier. Turk Findley is an ex-sailor and sometimes-drifter. They come together when an infall of cometary dust seeds the planet with tiny remnant Hypothetical machines. Soon, this seemingly hospitable world will become very alien indeed--as the nature of time is once again twisted, by entities unknown.

Synopsis:

Wildly praised by readers and critics alike, Robert Charles Wilsons Spin won science fictions highest honor, the Hugo Award for Best Novel.

 

Now, in Spins direct sequel, Wilson takes us to the "world next door"--the planet engineered by the mysterious Hypotheticals to support human life, and connected to Earth by way of the Arch that towers hundreds of miles over the Indian Ocean. Humans are colonizing this new world--and, predictably, fiercely exploiting its resources, chiefly large deposits of oil in the western deserts of the continent of Equatoria.

 

Lise Adams is a young woman attempting to uncover the mystery of her father's disappearance ten years earlier. Turk Findley is an ex-sailor and sometimes-drifter. They come together when an infall of cometary dust seeds the planet with tiny remnant Hypothetical machines. Soon, this seemingly hospitable world will become very alien indeed--as the nature of time is once again twisted, by entities unknown.

Robert Charles Wilsons novels include Darwinia; The Chronoliths and Blind Lake, which were finalists for SFs Hugo Award; and Spin, which won the Hugo for best novel. He is a winner of the Philip K. Dick Award and the John W. Campbell Memorial Award. He lives in Toronto, Canada.

In Axis, the direct sequel to Spin, Robert Charles Wilson takes us to the "world next door"the planet engineered by the mysterious Hypotheticals to support human life, and connected to Earth by way of the Arch that towers hundreds of miles over the Indian Ocean. Humans are colonizing this new worldand, predictably, fiercely exploiting its resources, chiefly large deposits of oil in the western deserts of the continent of Equatoria.

Lise Adams is a young woman attempting to uncover the mystery of her father's disappearance ten years earlier. Turk Findley is an ex-sailor and sometimes-drifter. They come together when an infall of cometary dust seeds the planet with tiny remnant Hypothetical machines. Soon, this seemingly hospitable world will become very alien indeedas the nature of time is once again twisted, by entities unknown.

“An exemplary sequel . . . superlatively crafted . . . Wilson has become a master at the integration of macro and micro story levels, which refract each other modestly and winningly.”John Clute, SciFi.com

“Elaborates on strange new sciences and old dangers in an adventure solidly grounded in science. Intriguing characters and strong storytelling make this an excellent choice for most sf collections.”Library Journal

“The sequel to Spin, Wilson's surpassingly strange yarn involves advanced alien Hypotheticals that, for reasons beyond speculation, moved Earth four-billion years into the future. Advanced biological techniques, including the means to prolong life by 30 years, were developed; those so treated became known as Fourths. And a huge space-warp Arch connects Earth to another habitable planet, Equatoria. Lise Adams comes to Equatoria to learn the fate of her father, Robert, a Fourth who vanished a decade ago. She hooks up with well-connected pilot and drifter Turk Findley, who asks old friend Tomas Ginn, another Fourth, about Robert. As an astonishing fall of ash from space, containing pieces of degenerating Hypothetical machines, coats the ground, Ginn vanishes. Lise learns that her ex-husband, Brian Gately, who works for the Department of Genomic Security, a sort of genetic CIA accountable to nobody, has had her followed. A second ash fall follows and grows into weird quasi-organic structures. Meanwhile, in an isolated desert community, Dr. Avram Dvali has performed a dangerous experiment, attempting to create a human capable of communicating with the Hypotheticals. The result is Isaac, a strange child with an odd affinity for the Hypothetical structures and an ability to detect something buried deep beneath the desert. As Lise loses her trust in Brian, and she and Turk try to evade capture by the DGS, Brian ponders photographs of Ginn's mutilated corpse and wonders what his superiors really want. This far-future odyssey, with its life-sized characters and unintelligible aliens, embellishes much while explaining little and ends up equally engrossing and exasperating.Kirkus Reviews

“In this outstanding sequel to Wilson's Hugo-winning Spin, we are taken to the mysterious planet Equatoria, a world apparently engineered for humanity by the inscrutable machine intelligences known as the Hypotheticals. Turk Findley, a man with a criminal past, runs an aeronautical charter service on the newly settled planet. Lise Adams, who hires Turk, is a would-be journalist searching for her vanished father, a scientist obsessed with the Hypotheticals and their illegal life extension technology. Meanwhile, young Isaac, genetically manipulated by rogue scientists so that he may become a conduit between humanity and the AIs, is coming of age, and something enormous and unknown is assembling itself far underground. The various science and thriller plot elements are successful, but this is first and foremost a novel of character. Turk and Lise, who might well be played by Bogart and Bacall, are powerfully drawn protagonists, and their strong presence in the novel makes the wonders provided all the more satisfying."Publishers Weekly (starred review)

Video

About the Author

Robert Charles Wilson's novels include Darwinia, The Chronoliths and Blind Lake, which were finalists for SF's Hugo Award; and Spin, which won the 2006 Hugo for best novel. He is a winner of the Philip K. Dick Award and the John W. Campbell Memorial Award. He lives in Toronto, Canada.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 2 comments:

Shoshana, August 8, 2008 (view all comments by Shoshana)
The sequel to Spin, Axis is yet another tightly-woven, thought-provoking novel from one of my favorites, Robert Charles Wilson. Wilson's earliest novels were very enjoyable but almost too tightly constructed. In his later works, there is some room for the reader to breathe, and thus, I think, to identify more with the protagonists. Spin described the enveloping of Earth by a mysterious barrier, and made some revelations about its origin and purposes. It is not necessary to have read it to understand Axis, though it might be helpful. Axis includes sufficient exposition about previous events to carry the story, but for the full effect of a theme that pervades Wilson's work, the shift from the numinous and inexplicable to the mundane and ordinary, read both.

Axis includes other echoes of Wilson's previous work, notably returning to the question of life as a recording or replica after death, and some characters' choices about whether or not to accede to this process. Wilson's Jungian themes are also present, and his aliens are, as always, believably alien. Read Axis in conjunction with Sturgeon's More Than Human: They're not the same, but they belong together and should contribute to an interesting discussion.
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Jvstin, June 27, 2008 (view all comments by Jvstin)
Axis is the second novel in a trilogy, the sequel to the Hugo award-winning novel Spin, by Robert Charles Wilson.


I loved the first novel in this series (although I thought at the time that it was a standalone), which sets one of Wilson's classic Big Ideas in motion and takes us through it with interesting characters. What if unknown aliens put a time bubble around the Earth, so as to slow its aging relative to the rest of the universe?

At the end of that novel, the shield changes subtly, and a gateway to another world appears, a chance for a new world, a new life, and a new opportunity.

Axis takes us to that world, and continues to develop the universe of the Hypotheticals, once again through the eyes of his characters.

Honestly, though, this suffers from middle book syndrome. It's clear that Wilson hasn't written many series (any, I think) and the book's pacing suffers for not being a self-contained work. It relies heavily on the first book (reading this one without the second is futile) and the characters and events don't sing like the first novel. This one is much more reliant on the interesting ideas (a la Mysterium) than the actual writing and characters themselves. The characters (even one from Spin) aren't as well developed as the ones in Spin. In this respect, the book is a disappointing step backward for Wilson.

Its predecessor won the Hugo award for best novel, I do not expect this one to be nominated, except perhaps in a weak field. It's not a terrible book, merely an average one.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780765309396
Author:
Wilson, Robert Charles
Publisher:
Tor Science Fiction
Subject:
Science Fiction - Adventure
Subject:
Cults
Subject:
Human-alien encounters
Subject:
Science / General
Subject:
Life on other planets
Subject:
Science fiction
Subject:
Science Fiction/Apocalyptic & Post-Apocalyptic
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Mass market paperback
Publication Date:
20080603
Binding:
Electronic book text in proprietary or open standard format
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
368
Dimensions:
9.25 x 6.13 x 1.00 in

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Axis Used Hardcover
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$9.95 In Stock
Product details 368 pages Tor Books - English 9780765309396 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "In this outstanding sequel to Wilson's Hugo-winning Spin (2005), we are taken to the mysterious planet Equatoria, a world apparently engineered for humanity by the inscrutable machine intelligences known as the Hypotheticals. Turk Findley, a man with a criminal past, runs an aeronautical charter service on the newly settled planet. Lise Adams, who hires Turk, is a would-be journalist searching for her vanished father, a scientist obsessed with the Hypotheticals and their illegal life extension technology. Meanwhile, young Isaac, genetically manipulated by rogue scientists so that he may become a conduit between humanity and the AIs, is coming of age, and something enormous and unknown is assembling itself far underground. The various science and thriller plot elements are successful, but this is first and foremost a novel of character. Turk and Lise, who might well be played by Bogart and Bacall, are powerfully drawn protagonists, and their strong presence in the novel makes the wonders provided all the more satisfying. Those unfamiliar with Spin may flounder a bit, but Wilson's fans will be ecstatic. (Sept.)" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "This absolutely worthy, abundantly marvelous sequel to Spin conjures humanity after an event so strange it's almost unimaginable."
"Review" by , "This far-future odyssey, with its life-sized characters and unintelligible aliens, embellishes much while explaining little and ends up equally engrossing and exasperating."
"Review" by , "This sequel...elaborates on strange new sciences and old dangers in an adventure solidly grounded in science. Intriguing characters and strong storytelling make this an excellent choice for most sf collections."
"Review" by , "[A]n exemplary sequel....What is remarkable about Axis is that, though very little actually happens over its moderate length...there is a pleasure in taking it kind of easy in Equatoria that maybe only an author as deeply and securely professional as Wilson could convey."
"Review" by , "Wilson has chosen depth over expansion, and the result is arguably what a middle novel in a trilogy should be, adding weight and density to the narrative instead of merely offering a place-holding intermezzo for the fireworks to come."
"Review" by , "To reassure the science-challenged reader, this book is not laden with technology. It is a rich tale with well-developed characters that touches on some of the basic philosophical questions of humans. Just read Spin first."
"Synopsis" by , The sequel to the Hugo Award-winning SF epic Spin.
"Synopsis" by , In the sequel to the Hugo Award-winning Spin, Wilson takes readers to the "world next door" — the planet engineered by the mysterious Hypotheticals to support human life. But as humans colonize this new world they, predictably, fiercely exploit its resources.
"Synopsis" by ,
The sequel to the Hugo Award-winning SF epic Spin
"Synopsis" by ,
The sequel to the Hugo Award-winning SF epic Spin.
"Synopsis" by ,
Wildly praised by readers and critics alike, Robert Charles Wilson's Spin won science fiction's highest honor, the Hugo Award for Best Novel.

 

Now, in Spin's direct sequel, Wilson takes us to the "world next door"--the planet engineered by the mysterious Hypotheticals to support human life, and connected to Earth by way of the Arch that towers hundreds of miles over the Indian Ocean. Humans are colonizing this new world--and, predictably, fiercely exploiting its resources, chiefly large deposits of oil in the western deserts of the continent of Equatoria.

 

Lise Adams is a young woman attempting to uncover the mystery of her father's disappearance ten years earlier. Turk Findley is an ex-sailor and sometimes-drifter. They come together when an infall of cometary dust seeds the planet with tiny remnant Hypothetical machines. Soon, this seemingly hospitable world will become very alien indeed--as the nature of time is once again twisted, by entities unknown.

"Synopsis" by ,
Wildly praised by readers and critics alike, Robert Charles Wilsons Spin won science fictions highest honor, the Hugo Award for Best Novel.

 

Now, in Spins direct sequel, Wilson takes us to the "world next door"--the planet engineered by the mysterious Hypotheticals to support human life, and connected to Earth by way of the Arch that towers hundreds of miles over the Indian Ocean. Humans are colonizing this new world--and, predictably, fiercely exploiting its resources, chiefly large deposits of oil in the western deserts of the continent of Equatoria.

 

Lise Adams is a young woman attempting to uncover the mystery of her father's disappearance ten years earlier. Turk Findley is an ex-sailor and sometimes-drifter. They come together when an infall of cometary dust seeds the planet with tiny remnant Hypothetical machines. Soon, this seemingly hospitable world will become very alien indeed--as the nature of time is once again twisted, by entities unknown.

Robert Charles Wilsons novels include Darwinia; The Chronoliths and Blind Lake, which were finalists for SFs Hugo Award; and Spin, which won the Hugo for best novel. He is a winner of the Philip K. Dick Award and the John W. Campbell Memorial Award. He lives in Toronto, Canada.

In Axis, the direct sequel to Spin, Robert Charles Wilson takes us to the "world next door"the planet engineered by the mysterious Hypotheticals to support human life, and connected to Earth by way of the Arch that towers hundreds of miles over the Indian Ocean. Humans are colonizing this new worldand, predictably, fiercely exploiting its resources, chiefly large deposits of oil in the western deserts of the continent of Equatoria.

Lise Adams is a young woman attempting to uncover the mystery of her father's disappearance ten years earlier. Turk Findley is an ex-sailor and sometimes-drifter. They come together when an infall of cometary dust seeds the planet with tiny remnant Hypothetical machines. Soon, this seemingly hospitable world will become very alien indeedas the nature of time is once again twisted, by entities unknown.

“An exemplary sequel . . . superlatively crafted . . . Wilson has become a master at the integration of macro and micro story levels, which refract each other modestly and winningly.”John Clute, SciFi.com

“Elaborates on strange new sciences and old dangers in an adventure solidly grounded in science. Intriguing characters and strong storytelling make this an excellent choice for most sf collections.”Library Journal

“The sequel to Spin, Wilson's surpassingly strange yarn involves advanced alien Hypotheticals that, for reasons beyond speculation, moved Earth four-billion years into the future. Advanced biological techniques, including the means to prolong life by 30 years, were developed; those so treated became known as Fourths. And a huge space-warp Arch connects Earth to another habitable planet, Equatoria. Lise Adams comes to Equatoria to learn the fate of her father, Robert, a Fourth who vanished a decade ago. She hooks up with well-connected pilot and drifter Turk Findley, who asks old friend Tomas Ginn, another Fourth, about Robert. As an astonishing fall of ash from space, containing pieces of degenerating Hypothetical machines, coats the ground, Ginn vanishes. Lise learns that her ex-husband, Brian Gately, who works for the Department of Genomic Security, a sort of genetic CIA accountable to nobody, has had her followed. A second ash fall follows and grows into weird quasi-organic structures. Meanwhile, in an isolated desert community, Dr. Avram Dvali has performed a dangerous experiment, attempting to create a human capable of communicating with the Hypotheticals. The result is Isaac, a strange child with an odd affinity for the Hypothetical structures and an ability to detect something buried deep beneath the desert. As Lise loses her trust in Brian, and she and Turk try to evade capture by the DGS, Brian ponders photographs of Ginn's mutilated corpse and wonders what his superiors really want. This far-future odyssey, with its life-sized characters and unintelligible aliens, embellishes much while explaining little and ends up equally engrossing and exasperating.Kirkus Reviews

“In this outstanding sequel to Wilson's Hugo-winning Spin, we are taken to the mysterious planet Equatoria, a world apparently engineered for humanity by the inscrutable machine intelligences known as the Hypotheticals. Turk Findley, a man with a criminal past, runs an aeronautical charter service on the newly settled planet. Lise Adams, who hires Turk, is a would-be journalist searching for her vanished father, a scientist obsessed with the Hypotheticals and their illegal life extension technology. Meanwhile, young Isaac, genetically manipulated by rogue scientists so that he may become a conduit between humanity and the AIs, is coming of age, and something enormous and unknown is assembling itself far underground. The various science and thriller plot elements are successful, but this is first and foremost a novel of character. Turk and Lise, who might well be played by Bogart and Bacall, are powerfully drawn protagonists, and their strong presence in the novel makes the wonders provided all the more satisfying."Publishers Weekly (starred review)

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