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According to Queeney

by

According to Queeney Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Some writers are drawn to the historical novel but few have risen to the task more ingeniously than Beryl Bainbridge," declares the New York Times Book Review, and in her latest work of fiction Bainbridge again proves the singularity of the invention and genius that produced her best-selling The Birthday Boys and award-winning Master Georgie. Taking her inspiration from eighteenth-century English history and literature, Bainbridge transforms meticulous research into a brilliantly imaginative portrayal of the complex relationship that the renowned literary giant Dr. Samuel Johnson enjoyed with his benefactress, Mrs. Thrale. Mrs. Thrale, however, also has a daughter. Her name is Queeney, and it is through her keen eye that the unusual alliance between the great man and his lesser-known but equally fascinating friend is explored.

Review:

"[Johnson] is a brilliant creation, and when, at the end of this luminous little novel, Ms. Bainbridge brings us to his end, we feel two losses simultaneously, the personal one and the loss to civilization." Richard Bernstein, New York Times

Review:

"Samuel Johnson and his friend Hester Thrale are the subjects of this novel as they appear to Hester's daughter; her case of mother-daughter conflict urges her toward forgetfulness, not understanding." New York Times, Notable Books 2001

Review:

"[Samuel Johnson] is the primary subject of Bainbridge's majestically deft new novel: the best yet in her series of dazzling historical reconstructions of British history....Absolutely wonderful." Kirkus Reviews

Review:

"Beryl Bainbridge's elegant, sombre novel sets out to recover the Thrales' Johnson, invariably obscured by Boswell's account of the undefeatable colossus of English literature....Bainbridge's Johnson is not Boswell's witty and rumbustious conversationalist. He is a tormented man, spiritually fearful and sexually guilty." John Mullan, The Guardian

Review:

"As she has proved time and again... few novelists now alive can match Bainbridge for the uncanny precision with which she enters into the ethos of a previous era.... The tension between the bizarre manners of the day and the unexpressed passions burning within is beautifully caught, and Queeney's skeptical commentary lends just the right distance." Publishers Weekly

Review:

"Bainbridge slyly puts readers at the same disadvantage as her characters, who are rarely clued in to the full picture; and this very constriction of viewpoint is what immerses readers so hectically in the lives and era of the novel. The result: Bainbridge never has to tell you where you are, because, by her own oblique and canny means, she has taken you there already." Michael Upchurch, The Atlantic Monthly (read the entire Atlantic Monthly review)

Review:

"Latin tutor and family friend Johnson was gentle and kind to Queeney, but here the eminent man of letters is portrayed as slovenly, eccentric, unstable, and ill. Bainbridge's novel is interesting as an experiment in writing about a figure from the past, but the fiction is often submerged beneath the history." Library Journal

Synopsis:

Bainbridges brilliantly imagined, universally acclaimed, Booker Prize-longlisted novel portrays the inordinate appetites and unrequited love touched off when the most celebrated man of eighteenth-century English letters, Samuel Johnson, enters the domain of a wealthy Southwark brewer and his wife, Hester Thrale. The melancholic, middle-aged lexicographer plunges into an increasingly ambiguous relationship with the vivacious Mrs. Thrale for the next twenty years. In that time Hesters eldest daughter, the neglected but prodigiously clever Queeney, will grow into young womanhood. Along the way, little of the emotional tangle and sexual tension stirring beneath the decorous surfaces of the Thrale household will escape Queeneys cold, observant eye. A dark, often hilarious and deeply human vision ... a major literary accomplishment.Margaret Atwood, Toronto Globe and Mail ...at the end of this luminous little novel ... we feel two losses ... the personal one and the loss to civilization.Richard Bernstein, New York Times Dialogue and descriptions subtly and skillfully convey a sense not only of the period but also the personalities.Merle Rubin, Los Angeles Times [Bainbridges] most accomplished novel so far.Washington Post Book World Majestically deft.... Absolutely wonderful.Kirkus Reviews (starred)

Synopsis:

Bainbridge's brilliantly imagined, universally acclaimed, Booker Prize-longlisted novel portrays the inordinate appetites and unrequited love touched off when the most celebrated man of eighteenth-century English letters, Samuel Johnson, enters the domain of a wealthy Southwark brewer and his wife, Hester Thrale. The melancholic, middle-aged lexicographer plunges into an increasingly ambiguous relationship with the vivacious Mrs. Thrale for the next twenty years. In that time Hester's eldest daughter, the neglected but prodigiously clever Queeney, will grow into young womanhood. Along the way, little of the emotional tangle and sexual tension stirring beneath the decorous surfaces of the Thrale household will escape Queeney's cold, observant eye. "A dark, often hilarious and deeply human vision ... a major literary accomplishment."—Margaret Atwood, Toronto Globe and Mail "...at the end of this luminous little novel ... we feel two losses ... the personal one and the loss to civilization."—Richard Bernstein, New York Times "Dialogue and descriptions subtly and skillfully convey a sense not only of the period but also the personalities."—Merle Rubin, Los Angeles Times "[Bainbridge's] most accomplished novel so far."—Washington Post Book World "Majestically deft.... Absolutely wonderful."—Kirkus Reviews (starred)

Product Details

ISBN:
9780786709823
Author:
Bainbridge, Beryl
Publisher:
Da Capo Press
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Historical
Subject:
Authors
Subject:
Historical - General
Subject:
Mothers and daughters
Copyright:
Publication Date:
June 2002
Binding:
Paperback
Language:
English
Pages:
224
Dimensions:
8.14x5.54x.65 in. .61 lbs.

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Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z

According to Queeney Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$4.50 In Stock
Product details 224 pages Carroll & Graf Publishers - English 9780786709823 Reviews:
"Review" by , "[Johnson] is a brilliant creation, and when, at the end of this luminous little novel, Ms. Bainbridge brings us to his end, we feel two losses simultaneously, the personal one and the loss to civilization."
"Review" by , "Samuel Johnson and his friend Hester Thrale are the subjects of this novel as they appear to Hester's daughter; her case of mother-daughter conflict urges her toward forgetfulness, not understanding."
"Review" by , "[Samuel Johnson] is the primary subject of Bainbridge's majestically deft new novel: the best yet in her series of dazzling historical reconstructions of British history....Absolutely wonderful."
"Review" by , "Beryl Bainbridge's elegant, sombre novel sets out to recover the Thrales' Johnson, invariably obscured by Boswell's account of the undefeatable colossus of English literature....Bainbridge's Johnson is not Boswell's witty and rumbustious conversationalist. He is a tormented man, spiritually fearful and sexually guilty."
"Review" by , "As she has proved time and again... few novelists now alive can match Bainbridge for the uncanny precision with which she enters into the ethos of a previous era.... The tension between the bizarre manners of the day and the unexpressed passions burning within is beautifully caught, and Queeney's skeptical commentary lends just the right distance."
"Review" by , "Bainbridge slyly puts readers at the same disadvantage as her characters, who are rarely clued in to the full picture; and this very constriction of viewpoint is what immerses readers so hectically in the lives and era of the novel. The result: Bainbridge never has to tell you where you are, because, by her own oblique and canny means, she has taken you there already." (read the entire Atlantic Monthly review)
"Review" by , "Latin tutor and family friend Johnson was gentle and kind to Queeney, but here the eminent man of letters is portrayed as slovenly, eccentric, unstable, and ill. Bainbridge's novel is interesting as an experiment in writing about a figure from the past, but the fiction is often submerged beneath the history."
"Synopsis" by , Bainbridges brilliantly imagined, universally acclaimed, Booker Prize-longlisted novel portrays the inordinate appetites and unrequited love touched off when the most celebrated man of eighteenth-century English letters, Samuel Johnson, enters the domain of a wealthy Southwark brewer and his wife, Hester Thrale. The melancholic, middle-aged lexicographer plunges into an increasingly ambiguous relationship with the vivacious Mrs. Thrale for the next twenty years. In that time Hesters eldest daughter, the neglected but prodigiously clever Queeney, will grow into young womanhood. Along the way, little of the emotional tangle and sexual tension stirring beneath the decorous surfaces of the Thrale household will escape Queeneys cold, observant eye. A dark, often hilarious and deeply human vision ... a major literary accomplishment.Margaret Atwood, Toronto Globe and Mail ...at the end of this luminous little novel ... we feel two losses ... the personal one and the loss to civilization.Richard Bernstein, New York Times Dialogue and descriptions subtly and skillfully convey a sense not only of the period but also the personalities.Merle Rubin, Los Angeles Times [Bainbridges] most accomplished novel so far.Washington Post Book World Majestically deft.... Absolutely wonderful.Kirkus Reviews (starred)
"Synopsis" by ,
Bainbridge's brilliantly imagined, universally acclaimed, Booker Prize-longlisted novel portrays the inordinate appetites and unrequited love touched off when the most celebrated man of eighteenth-century English letters, Samuel Johnson, enters the domain of a wealthy Southwark brewer and his wife, Hester Thrale. The melancholic, middle-aged lexicographer plunges into an increasingly ambiguous relationship with the vivacious Mrs. Thrale for the next twenty years. In that time Hester's eldest daughter, the neglected but prodigiously clever Queeney, will grow into young womanhood. Along the way, little of the emotional tangle and sexual tension stirring beneath the decorous surfaces of the Thrale household will escape Queeney's cold, observant eye. "A dark, often hilarious and deeply human vision ... a major literary accomplishment."—Margaret Atwood, Toronto Globe and Mail "...at the end of this luminous little novel ... we feel two losses ... the personal one and the loss to civilization."—Richard Bernstein, New York Times "Dialogue and descriptions subtly and skillfully convey a sense not only of the period but also the personalities."—Merle Rubin, Los Angeles Times "[Bainbridge's] most accomplished novel so far."—Washington Post Book World "Majestically deft.... Absolutely wonderful."—Kirkus Reviews (starred)
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