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1 Burnside Children's Young Adult- General

It's Kind of a Funny Story

by

It's Kind of a Funny Story Cover

ISBN13: 9780786851966
ISBN10: 0786851961
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
All Product Details

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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Like many smart, ambitious New York City teenagers, Craig Gilner seeks entry into Manhattan's most prestigious school, Executive Pre-Professional High School. With single-minded determination, he works night and day to ace the entrance exam and gets in. That's when everything starts to unravel.

Once Craig starts his new school, he realizes he's just one of many brilliant kids, and he isn't even brilliant, he's average. As Craig starts getting so-so grades, he sees his once-perfect future crumbling away. He begins to have trouble eating, sleeping, and thinking — that's when he tells his parents he's depressed. He goes on medication and talks to therapists, but things keep getting worse, until one night Craig feels so low that he seriously considers suicide.

But instead, Craig calls a hotline. The counselor tells him to get to the nearest hospital, and before he knows it, he's signed, sealed, and delivered into one of Brooklyn's finest psychiatric units.

Craig's new roommate is an Egyptian schoolteacher who refuses to get out of bed. His neighbors include a transsexual sex addict, and a girl who has scarred her own face with scissors. But somehow in this motley crew, Craig finds real friends and kindred spirits who give him strength.

This is a remarkably moving and authentic picture of the physicality, the despair, and even the hilarity, of depression.

Review:

"It's so hard to talk when you want to kill yourself' is the attention-grabbing first line of Vizzini's (Be More Chill) highly readable and ultimately upbeat novel. Though Craig was elated when he passed the entry exam for Manhattan's highly competitive Executive Pre-Professional High School, during his first year there he grows increasingly overwhelmed. Matters aren't helped by his new habit of smoking pot and then tormenting himself by hanging out with his best friend, Aaron, and Aaron's girlfriend, Nia, on whom Craig has a longstanding crush. Unable to eat and seriously considering suicide, Craig checks himself into a psychiatric hospital. There, Craig finds his true calling as a visual artist, begins a promising romantic relationship with another patient, helps yet another patient get a place in an adult home, and arranges a thoughtful treat for his reclusive Egyptian roommate — all in a mere five days, a timeframe that readers struggling with their own issues may find somewhat daunting. Still, few would begrudge Craig his exhilarating recovery. The author clearly has not lost his knack for conveying the textures of teenage life. Ages 13-up." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"Craig's well-paced narrative, carefully and insightfully detailing his confusing slide and his desperate efforts to get well, is filled with humor and pathos." School Library Journal

Review:

"[W]hat's terrific about the book is Craig's voice — intimate, real, funny, ironic, and one kids will come closer to hear....This book offers hope in a package that readers will find enticing, and that's the gift it offers." Booklist

Review:

"Ned Vizzini's newest novel is peppered with drinking, drugs, and sex, as well as familiar subjects that today's teens are faced with on a regular basis." Children's Literature

Review:

"For the readers who stick with him until the end, the results will resonate with them just as loudly as Craig's newfound credo: to live for real." Kirkus Reviews

Synopsis:

A contemporary YA drama about a young man suffering from Schizophreniform disorder, who falls into a love triangle with a girl in his class...and a girl in his head.

Synopsis:

Like many ambitious New York City teenagers, Craig Gilner sees entry into Manhattan's Executive Pre-Professional High School as the ticket to his future. Determined to succeed at life-which means getting into the right high school to get into the right college to get the right job-Craig studies night and day to ace the entrance exam, and does. That's when things start to get crazy.

At his new school, Craig realizes that he isn't brilliant compared to the other kids; he's just average, and maybe not even that. He soon sees his once-perfect future crumbling away. The stress becomes unbearable and Craig stops eating and sleeping-until, one night, he nearly kills himself.

Craig's suicidal episode gets him checked into a mental hospital, where his new neighbors include a transsexual sex addict, a girl who has scarred her own face with scissors, and the self-elected President Armelio. There, isolated from the crushing pressures of school and friends, Craig is finally able to confront the sources of his anxiety.

Ned Vizzini, who himself spent time in a psychiatric hospital, has created a remarkably moving tale about the sometimes unexpected road to happiness. For a novel about depression, it's definitely a funny story.

Synopsis:

“Mad crashes into happy and sad bounces off of guilty until they all live in a big smoky heap in my mind.” Fourteen-year-old Cameron Galloway of Lexington, Washington, understands that he has schizophreniform disorder and needs to take pills to quiet the voices in his head. But he likes the voices, especially the gentle, encouraging voice of The Girl. Conflicted, he turns to his friend Nina Savage, who is clinically depressed and can relate to his horror of the numbing effects of medication. They make a pact to ditch the pills. At first they feel triumphant, but soon Camerons untreated mind goes haywire—to disastrous effect.

About the Author

Ned Vizzini's own experience in a psychiatric hospital inspired him to write this story. He is also the author of Be More Chill and Teen Angst? Naah...

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 5 comments:

wuzzlkins, February 3, 2013 (view all comments by wuzzlkins)
It's Kind of a Funny Story by Ned Vizzini, starts off with Craig deep in thought about life. He says, "It's so hard to talk when you want to kill yourself." this instantly made me wonder what made him want to die. What triggered his depression? The book does start off rather slow, but when his depression peaks, that is when the books pace speeds up. All of a sudden it runs through his past and then back to where he is planning his suicide. Craig has everything all set up but later checks into the mental hospital which really becomes the setting of this book. When he arrives, this is where I really became attached to this book. You saw people and their problems from a different view; apart from the stereotypical "crazy." you became attached to each and every one of the characters no matter what was wrong with them. You saw them as normal. In the review, “Now I Understand Mental Health." that title was right on! It really summarizes what impact this book does have on you. The Reader really understood that It's Kind of a Funny Story takes you and puts you inside the minds of people with a mental disorder. I absolutely love how Vizzini puts you in the body of Craig with his words. He makes you feel exactly how Craig is feeling. For example, when he added the voice in Craig’s head criticizing him, it added tension. “do you even know who the enemy is?" and Craig responds, "I think it’s Me." it showed you just how serious his depression is and what was racing through his mind. There is one quote that literally made me stop and think about. “I have a plan and a solution. I’m going to kill myself." this drove me nuts! I really put myself in Craig’s shoes here and tried to understand why he thought death / suicide was a solution! Vizzini does such a wonderful job of making you think about each and every word he writes and discover just how deep and meaningful this book is. I would most definitely recommend this book! I already have my friend reading it.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
Tyrael_10, July 3, 2008 (view all comments by Tyrael_10)
This was a great book, i have never been as interested in any book as i am of this one. Its about a normal teenager named Craig Gilner who wants to succeed in life so he tries hard to get into this Executive Pre-Professional High School. But this leads to some problems which Craig refers to as "tentacles". He starts noticing that while he is getting 93's in his classes others were getting 100's and they were all more advanced in the classes they took, plus they were in clubs. This made him feel dumb and depressed. On top of all of this his best friend Aaron gets with a girl named Nia, which Craig really likes. Soon all of this pressure got to him and he decided to kill himself one night by jumping off the Brooklyn Bridge. Instead he calls the suicide hot line which instructs him to go to the hospital. While in Argenon Hospital he meets other ppl who have similar problems. He meets a transexual sex addict, a girl named Noelle who scarred her on face with scissors, and other depressed people. Craig eventually finds what he calls an "anchor". His "anchor" is his art or "brain maps" as he calls them. Craig felt safe at the hospital but hes knows its a fake environment and he knew he would have to face the real world eventually. He gets Noelles number to keep in touch with her when he gets out. In five days his parents come for him and he feels, while walking home, that the real "shift" had occurred in his brain.

I feel this book really connects with the teenagers of today with all we have to face and it shows them how one teenager learned to deal with it all and that suicide was no solution.
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(15 of 25 readers found this comment helpful)
jessica_curtis2005, May 16, 2008 (view all comments by jessica_curtis2005)
I found this book amazing. I like how Ned Vizzini wrote this book. I rarley read books but my friend told me about it and the title caught my attention and sio read it, it took me 3 days to read it cause it was so good.

But anyways, Craig is a prime example of how life can be and how some people act in life, he's not the only one going through depression.

I just loved the book.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(9 of 15 readers found this comment helpful)
View all 5 comments

Product Details

ISBN:
9780786851966
Author:
Vizzini, Ned
Publisher:
Disney-Hyperion
Author:
Anderson, Laurie Halse
Author:
Averett, Edward
Subject:
General
Subject:
Mental Illness
Subject:
Depression, mental
Subject:
General Juvenile Fiction
Subject:
New york (n.y.)
Subject:
Humorous Stories
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20070501
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
from 8 up to 17
Language:
English
Pages:
448
Dimensions:
8.25 x 5.5 in 1 lb
Age Level:
13-17

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Related Subjects

Young Adult » General

It's Kind of a Funny Story Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$9.95 In Stock
Product details 448 pages Miramax Books - English 9780786851966 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "It's so hard to talk when you want to kill yourself' is the attention-grabbing first line of Vizzini's (Be More Chill) highly readable and ultimately upbeat novel. Though Craig was elated when he passed the entry exam for Manhattan's highly competitive Executive Pre-Professional High School, during his first year there he grows increasingly overwhelmed. Matters aren't helped by his new habit of smoking pot and then tormenting himself by hanging out with his best friend, Aaron, and Aaron's girlfriend, Nia, on whom Craig has a longstanding crush. Unable to eat and seriously considering suicide, Craig checks himself into a psychiatric hospital. There, Craig finds his true calling as a visual artist, begins a promising romantic relationship with another patient, helps yet another patient get a place in an adult home, and arranges a thoughtful treat for his reclusive Egyptian roommate — all in a mere five days, a timeframe that readers struggling with their own issues may find somewhat daunting. Still, few would begrudge Craig his exhilarating recovery. The author clearly has not lost his knack for conveying the textures of teenage life. Ages 13-up." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "Craig's well-paced narrative, carefully and insightfully detailing his confusing slide and his desperate efforts to get well, is filled with humor and pathos."
"Review" by , "[W]hat's terrific about the book is Craig's voice — intimate, real, funny, ironic, and one kids will come closer to hear....This book offers hope in a package that readers will find enticing, and that's the gift it offers."
"Review" by , "Ned Vizzini's newest novel is peppered with drinking, drugs, and sex, as well as familiar subjects that today's teens are faced with on a regular basis."
"Review" by , "For the readers who stick with him until the end, the results will resonate with them just as loudly as Craig's newfound credo: to live for real."
"Synopsis" by ,
A contemporary YA drama about a young man suffering from Schizophreniform disorder, who falls into a love triangle with a girl in his class...and a girl in his head.

"Synopsis" by , Like many ambitious New York City teenagers, Craig Gilner sees entry into Manhattan's Executive Pre-Professional High School as the ticket to his future. Determined to succeed at life-which means getting into the right high school to get into the right college to get the right job-Craig studies night and day to ace the entrance exam, and does. That's when things start to get crazy.

At his new school, Craig realizes that he isn't brilliant compared to the other kids; he's just average, and maybe not even that. He soon sees his once-perfect future crumbling away. The stress becomes unbearable and Craig stops eating and sleeping-until, one night, he nearly kills himself.

Craig's suicidal episode gets him checked into a mental hospital, where his new neighbors include a transsexual sex addict, a girl who has scarred her own face with scissors, and the self-elected President Armelio. There, isolated from the crushing pressures of school and friends, Craig is finally able to confront the sources of his anxiety.

Ned Vizzini, who himself spent time in a psychiatric hospital, has created a remarkably moving tale about the sometimes unexpected road to happiness. For a novel about depression, it's definitely a funny story.

"Synopsis" by , “Mad crashes into happy and sad bounces off of guilty until they all live in a big smoky heap in my mind.” Fourteen-year-old Cameron Galloway of Lexington, Washington, understands that he has schizophreniform disorder and needs to take pills to quiet the voices in his head. But he likes the voices, especially the gentle, encouraging voice of The Girl. Conflicted, he turns to his friend Nina Savage, who is clinically depressed and can relate to his horror of the numbing effects of medication. They make a pact to ditch the pills. At first they feel triumphant, but soon Camerons untreated mind goes haywire—to disastrous effect.
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