Master your Minecraft
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN a $100 Credit

Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news
for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

Tour our stores


    Recently Viewed clear list


    What I'm Giving | December 5, 2014

    William Gibson: IMG William Gibson: What I'm Giving



    At Powell's, we feel the holidays are the perfect time to share our love of books with those close to us. For this special blog series, we reached... Continue »

    spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$11.95
List price: $41.25
Used Hardcover
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Local Warehouse Biology- Viruses

More copies of this ISBN

This title in other editions

Hunting the 1918 Flu

by

Hunting the 1918 Flu Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In 1918, medical science was at a loss to explain the Spanish flu epidemic, which swept the world in three great waves and killed an estimated 20 to 40 million people in just one year, more than the number that died during the four years of World War I. Today, while the Spanish flu has faded in the public's memory, most virologists are convinced that sooner or later a similarly deadly flu virus will return with a vengeance.

Responding to this sustained interest in the Spanish flu, Kirsty Duncan in Hunting the 1918 Flu presents a detailed account of her experiences as she organized a multi-national, multi-discipline scientific expedition to exhume the bodies of a group of Norwegian miners, buried in Svalbard, all of whom died from the Spanish flu virus. Duncan weaves a twofold narrative: first, the story of a large-scale medical project with the objective of uncovering genetic material from the Spanish flu and second, a first-hand account of the turbulent politics that emerged as the group moved towards a goal where the egos were as strong as the stakes were high. Duncan, herself not an epidemiologist but a physical geographer, is very frank about her bruising emotional, financial, and professional experience on the 'dark side of science.' Readers witness how the research team engages in 'entropic' behaviour, despite its presumed dedication to science and the search for the virus, as the compelling story unfolds through the beginning progress and harrowing conclusion of her project (1992-2001).

In her account of pursuing the deadly killer, Kirsty Duncan raises questions not only regarding public health, epidemiology, ethics of science, and the rights of subjects but also about age, gender, and privilege in science. While her search for the virus has shown promising preliminary results, it has also shown the dangers of science itself being subsumed in the rush for personal acclaim.

Book News Annotation:

In 1918, the Spanish flu epidemic killed an estimated 20 to 40 million people worldwide. Its origins remain unknown. In this text, Duncan (medical geography, U. of Toronto) recounts her experiences organizing an international scientific expedition that sought to unravel a piece of this mystery through studying the remains of some Norwegian miners killed in the epidemic. Through this narrative, Duncan explores some larger themes, such as the rights of research subjects and the role of age, gender, and privilege in science.
Annotation 2004 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

Seventy-five years after the initial outbreaks, the scientific world still has no specific answers to the questions of the identity of the causal agents of the Spanish flu and encephalitis lethargica. They had become two of the world's and history's greatest medical mysteries. In 1992, reading about the flu's gruesome effects and the experts' alarming predictions made me want to investigate them. However, I am not a virologist, nor a neuropathologist. I am a geographer. I have taught meteorology, climatology, climate change, and medical geography. In 1992, I knew nothing about influenza or sleeping sickness: strike one. I was young with little track record: strike two. I am a woman: strike three. Although I did not know it all those years ago, I was to find that there are barriers for women in science, particularly for relatively young women. Nevertheless, I felt driven to solve the unanswered puzzles. This is the story of the voyage that followed. In 1918, medical science was at a loss to explain the Spanish flu epidemic, which swept the world in three great waves and killed an estimated 20 to 40 million people in just one year, more than the number that died during the four years of World War I. Today, while the Spanish flu has faded in the public's memory, most virologists are convinced that sooner or later a similarly deadly flu virus will return with a vengeance. Responding to this sustained interest in the Spanish flu, Kirsty Duncan in Hunting the 1918 Flu presents a detailed account of her experiences as she organized a multi-national, multi-discipline scientific expedition to exhume the bodies of a group of Norwegian miners, buried in Svalbard, all of whom died from the Spanishflu virus. Duncan weaves a twofold narrative: first, the story of a largescale medical project with the objective of uncovering genetic material from the Spanish flu and second, a first-hand account of the turbulent politics that emerged as the group moved towards a goal where the egos were as strong as the stakes were high. Duncan, herself not an epidemiologist but a physical geographer, is very frank about her bruising emotional, financial, and professional experience on the 'dark side of science.' Readers witness how the research team engages in 'entropic' behaviour, despite its presumed dedication to science and the search for the virus, as the compelling story unfolds through the beginning progress and harrowing conclusion of her project (1992-2001). In her account of pursuing the deadly killer, Kirsty Duncan raises questions not only regarding public health, epidemiology, ethics of science, and the rights of subjects but also about age, gender, and privilege in science. While her search for the virus has shown promising preliminary results, it has also shown the dangers of science itself being subsumed in the rush for personal acclaim.

Synopsis:

Seventy-five years after the initial outbreaks, the scientific world still has no answers to the questions of the identity of the causal agents of the Spanish flu and encephalitis lethargica. Here, Duncan presents a detailed account of her investigation into the deadly virus.

Synopsis:

Includes bibliographical references (p. [285]-292) and index.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780802087485
Author:
Duncan, Kirsty E
Publisher:
University of Toronto Press
Author:
Duncan, Kirsty E.
Location:
Toronto
Subject:
History
Subject:
Epidemiology
Subject:
Medical History & Records
Subject:
Infectious Diseases
Subject:
Influenza
Subject:
Epidemiologic methods.
Subject:
Disease outbreaks.
Subject:
Ethics, Professional.
Subject:
History of Science-General
Copyright:
Series Volume:
576
Publication Date:
20030531
Binding:
Hardcover
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Yes
Pages:
304
Dimensions:
9.22x7.12x1.17 in. 1.38 lbs.

Other books you might like

  1. The Stone Cold Truth Used Hardcover $6.95
  2. In the Wake of Madness: The... Used Hardcover $7.50
  3. The Broker
    Used Book Club Paperback $1.95
  4. Satisfaction New Trade Paper $11.75
  5. Koviashuvik :a time and place of joy Used Hardcover $3.48
  6. The Sexual Life of Catherine M.
    Used Hardcover $4.50

Related Subjects

Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » Medical Specialties
Reference » Science Reference » General
Science and Mathematics » Biology » Viruses
Science and Mathematics » History of Science » General

Hunting the 1918 Flu Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$11.95 In Stock
Product details 304 pages University of Toronto Press - English 9780802087485 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Seventy-five years after the initial outbreaks, the scientific world still has no specific answers to the questions of the identity of the causal agents of the Spanish flu and encephalitis lethargica. They had become two of the world's and history's greatest medical mysteries. In 1992, reading about the flu's gruesome effects and the experts' alarming predictions made me want to investigate them. However, I am not a virologist, nor a neuropathologist. I am a geographer. I have taught meteorology, climatology, climate change, and medical geography. In 1992, I knew nothing about influenza or sleeping sickness: strike one. I was young with little track record: strike two. I am a woman: strike three. Although I did not know it all those years ago, I was to find that there are barriers for women in science, particularly for relatively young women. Nevertheless, I felt driven to solve the unanswered puzzles. This is the story of the voyage that followed. In 1918, medical science was at a loss to explain the Spanish flu epidemic, which swept the world in three great waves and killed an estimated 20 to 40 million people in just one year, more than the number that died during the four years of World War I. Today, while the Spanish flu has faded in the public's memory, most virologists are convinced that sooner or later a similarly deadly flu virus will return with a vengeance. Responding to this sustained interest in the Spanish flu, Kirsty Duncan in Hunting the 1918 Flu presents a detailed account of her experiences as she organized a multi-national, multi-discipline scientific expedition to exhume the bodies of a group of Norwegian miners, buried in Svalbard, all of whom died from the Spanishflu virus. Duncan weaves a twofold narrative: first, the story of a largescale medical project with the objective of uncovering genetic material from the Spanish flu and second, a first-hand account of the turbulent politics that emerged as the group moved towards a goal where the egos were as strong as the stakes were high. Duncan, herself not an epidemiologist but a physical geographer, is very frank about her bruising emotional, financial, and professional experience on the 'dark side of science.' Readers witness how the research team engages in 'entropic' behaviour, despite its presumed dedication to science and the search for the virus, as the compelling story unfolds through the beginning progress and harrowing conclusion of her project (1992-2001). In her account of pursuing the deadly killer, Kirsty Duncan raises questions not only regarding public health, epidemiology, ethics of science, and the rights of subjects but also about age, gender, and privilege in science. While her search for the virus has shown promising preliminary results, it has also shown the dangers of science itself being subsumed in the rush for personal acclaim.
"Synopsis" by , Seventy-five years after the initial outbreaks, the scientific world still has no answers to the questions of the identity of the causal agents of the Spanish flu and encephalitis lethargica. Here, Duncan presents a detailed account of her investigation into the deadly virus.
"Synopsis" by , Includes bibliographical references (p. [285]-292) and index.
spacer
spacer
  • back to top

FOLLOW US ON...

     
Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.