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1 Burnside Literature- A to Z

Bitter Fruit

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Bitter Fruit Cover

ISBN13: 9780802170064
ISBN10: 0802170064
Condition: Standard
All Product Details

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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The last time Silas Ali encountered Lieutenant Du Boise, he was locked in the back of a police van and the Lieutenant was conducting a vicious assault on his wife Lydia, in revenge for her husband's ANC activities. When Silas sees him again, by chance, twenty years later, as the Truth and Reconciliation Commission is due to deliver its report, crimes from the past erupt into the present, splintering Ali's fragile peace of mind. Bitter Fruit, a finalist for the Man Booker Prize, is also the story of Silas and Lydia's son Mikey, a thoroughly contemporary young hip-hop Lothario, and how he understands his parents' activist pasts. By turns harrowing, erotic and fearlessly satirical, it is a portrait of a brittle family, a dysfunctional society, and how we do, or do not, address the past's deepest wounds.

Review:

"Early in Dangor's embittered second novel about his native South Africa, aloof, independent 19-year-old Mikey comes to the realization that 'history has a remembering process of its own, one that gives life to its imaginary monsters.' This understanding of the past informs the thoughts and actions of the characters, which the author of Kafka's Curse explores in meticulous detail. Mikey's parents, Silas and Lydia Ali, are members of the black middle class in postapartheid South Africa. But when Silas, a lawyer for the Justice Department, encounters the white police lieutenant who raped his wife two decades before, old wounds open in his and Lydia's already strained marriage. Mikey discovers that he may be the product of his mother's violation and sets out to explore his familial roots, taking a type of 'apartheid heritage route' that leads him to Silas's father's mosque. Here, he learns of his grandfather's own struggle with colonialism in India a generation earlier. Dangor's novel, a Man Booker Prize finalist, interrogates the forgiving attitude of people like Archbishop Tutu, and, as Silas puts it, 'the namby-pambying of God's ferocious legions.' In this environment, where even incestuous transgressions can be rationalized away, Mikey finds vengeance as a way to order the decayed social structures around him. Dangor's work is a bleak look at modern South Africa in the vein of J.M. Coetzee's novels, but from the perspective of black South Africans." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Synopsis:

With the publication of Kafka's Curse, Achmat Dangor established himself as an utterly singular voice in South African fiction. His new novel, a finalist for the Man Booker Prize and the IMPAC-Dublin Literary Award, is a clear-eyed, witty, yet deeply serious look at South Africa's political history and its damaging legacy in the lives of those who live there.

The last time Silas Ali encountered Lieutenant Du Boise, Silas was locked in the back of a police van and the lieutenant was conducting a vicious assault on Silas's wife, Lydia, in revenge for her husband's participation in Nelson Mandela's African National Congress. When Silas sees Du Boise by chance twenty years later, as the Truth and Reconciliation Commission is about to deliver its report, crimes from the past erupt into the present, splintering the Alis' fragile peace. Meanwhile Silas and Lydia's son, Mikey, a thoroughly contemporary young hip-hop lothario, contends in unforeseen ways with his parents' pasts.

A harrowing story of a brittle family on the crossroads of history and a fearless skewering of the pieties of revolutionary movements, Bitter Fruit is a cautionary tale of how we do, or do not, address the past's deepest wounds.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

2423648, September 14, 2006 (view all comments by 2423648)
Iatarted reading this novel not because i wanted to but because it was prescribed by my university last year and in the end i was not dissapointed i enjoyed it so much that i actualy read it again. This shocked me because even though i live in South Africa and know about Apartheid struggles i was never really interested (i am ashamed to say). Since reading this book i have a renewed respect for all the people who lived through the struggle. I must admit that even though dangor is brutally honest and shocking in his telling of this story, it is that that kept me interested. This is, unfostunately, not the type of book that young peoply picks up and immediately have an interest in.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780802170064
Author:
Dangor, Achmat
Publisher:
Grove Press
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Married people
Subject:
Conflict of generations
Subject:
FICTION / Literary
Subject:
Domestic fiction
Subject:
Racially mixed people
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Paper
Publication Date:
20050331
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Pages:
288
Dimensions:
825x550

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Related Subjects

Business » Human Resource Management
Business » Management
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z

Bitter Fruit Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$5.50 In Stock
Product details 288 pages Grove/Atlantic - English 9780802170064 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Early in Dangor's embittered second novel about his native South Africa, aloof, independent 19-year-old Mikey comes to the realization that 'history has a remembering process of its own, one that gives life to its imaginary monsters.' This understanding of the past informs the thoughts and actions of the characters, which the author of Kafka's Curse explores in meticulous detail. Mikey's parents, Silas and Lydia Ali, are members of the black middle class in postapartheid South Africa. But when Silas, a lawyer for the Justice Department, encounters the white police lieutenant who raped his wife two decades before, old wounds open in his and Lydia's already strained marriage. Mikey discovers that he may be the product of his mother's violation and sets out to explore his familial roots, taking a type of 'apartheid heritage route' that leads him to Silas's father's mosque. Here, he learns of his grandfather's own struggle with colonialism in India a generation earlier. Dangor's novel, a Man Booker Prize finalist, interrogates the forgiving attitude of people like Archbishop Tutu, and, as Silas puts it, 'the namby-pambying of God's ferocious legions.' In this environment, where even incestuous transgressions can be rationalized away, Mikey finds vengeance as a way to order the decayed social structures around him. Dangor's work is a bleak look at modern South Africa in the vein of J.M. Coetzee's novels, but from the perspective of black South Africans." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by ,
With the publication of Kafka's Curse, Achmat Dangor established himself as an utterly singular voice in South African fiction. His new novel, a finalist for the Man Booker Prize and the IMPAC-Dublin Literary Award, is a clear-eyed, witty, yet deeply serious look at South Africa's political history and its damaging legacy in the lives of those who live there.

The last time Silas Ali encountered Lieutenant Du Boise, Silas was locked in the back of a police van and the lieutenant was conducting a vicious assault on Silas's wife, Lydia, in revenge for her husband's participation in Nelson Mandela's African National Congress. When Silas sees Du Boise by chance twenty years later, as the Truth and Reconciliation Commission is about to deliver its report, crimes from the past erupt into the present, splintering the Alis' fragile peace. Meanwhile Silas and Lydia's son, Mikey, a thoroughly contemporary young hip-hop lothario, contends in unforeseen ways with his parents' pasts.

A harrowing story of a brittle family on the crossroads of history and a fearless skewering of the pieties of revolutionary movements, Bitter Fruit is a cautionary tale of how we do, or do not, address the past's deepest wounds.

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