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Walking Zero: Discovering Cosmic Space and Time Along the Prime Meridian

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Walking Zero: Discovering Cosmic Space and Time Along the Prime Meridian Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Please note that used books may not include additional media (study guides, CDs, DVDs, solutions manuals, etc.) as described in the publisher comments.

Publisher Comments:


Noted science writer Chet Raymo explores how we found our place in space and time, and what it has meant to humankind.

In Walking Zero, Chet Raymo uses the Prime Meridian< the line of zero longitude and the standard for all the world's maps and clocks, to tell the story of humandkind's intellectual journey from a cosmos not much larger than ourselves to the universe of the galaxies and geologic eons.

As in his highly praised The Path and Climbing Brandon, Raymo connects personally with the story by walking England's Prime Meridian from Brighton through Greenwich to the North Sea. The Prime Meridian passes near a surprising number of landmarks that loom large in science: Isaac Newton's chambers at Trinity College, Cambridge; Charles Darwin's home at Down, in Kent; the site where the first dinosaur fossils were discovered; and John Harrison's clocks in a museum room of the Royal Observatory, among many others. Visiting them in turn, Raymo brings to life the human dramas of courageous individuals who bucked reigning orthodoxies to expand our horizons, including one brave rebel who paid the ultimate price for surmising the multitude of worlds we now take for granted.

A splendid short history of astronomy and geology, Walking Zero illuminates the startling interplay of science, psychology, faith, and the arts in our understanding of space and time.

Review:

"Raymo's presentation on the history of science tied to physical landmarks along the prime meridian creates an enchanting perspective on a well-exposed topic. An excellent read for anyone interested in science, history, and hiking the English countryside." Library Journal

Review:

"Raymo has a goodeye for colorful detail, and brings it to bear on his narrative. Well written, congenial, and full of lore...about both England and the history of science." Kirkus Reviews

Book News Annotation:

In 2003, Raymo (a former science and nature columnist for the Boston Globe) set out to walk across southeastern England along the prime meridian. As becomes clear in the opening pages of his book, his intent was less to recount his travels than to use the prime meridian--the zero line for geographical longitude and international time, as well as a line that runs close to the area of the first dinosaur fossil discoveries, Charles Darwin's home, Isaac Newton's faculty offices, and other important scientific landmarks--as a conceit to explore the scientific history of investigations into space and time.
Annotation 2007 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Book News Annotation:

In 2003, Raymo (a former science and nature columnist for the Boston Globe) set out to walk across southeastern England along the prime meridian. As becomes clear in the opening pages of his book, his intent was less to recount his travels than to use the prime meridian--the zero line for geographical longitude and international time, as well as a line that runs close to the area of the first dinosaur fossil discoveries, Charles Darwin's home, Isaac Newton's faculty offices, and other important scientific landmarks--as a conceit to explore the scientific history of investigations into space and time. Annotation ©2007 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

Noted science writer Chet Raymo explores how we found our place in space and time, and what it has meant to humankind.

In Walking Zero, Chet Raymo uses the Prime Meridian--the line of zero longitude and the standard for all the world's maps and clocks--to tell the story of humandkind's intellectual journey from a cosmos not much larger than ourselves to the universe of the galaxies and geologic eons.

As in his highly praised The Path and Climbing Brandon, Raymo connects personally with the story by walking England's Prime Meridian from Brighton through Greenwich to the North Sea. The Prime Meridian passes near a surprising number of landmarks that loom large in science: Isaac Newton's chambers at Trinity College, Cambridge; Charles Darwin's home at Down, in Kent; the site where the first dinosaur fossils were discovered; and John Harrison's clocks in a museum room of the Royal Observatory, among many others. Visiting them in turn, Raymo brings to life the human dramas of courageous individuals who bucked reigning orthodoxies to expand our horizons, including one brave rebel who paid the ultimate price for surmising the multitude of worlds we now take for granted.

A splendid short history of astronomy and geology, Walking Zero illuminates the startling interplay of science, psychology, faith, and the arts in our understanding of space and time.

For nearly forty years, Chet Raymo has been exploring the relationship between science, nature, and the humanities as a professor, writer, illustrator, and naturalist. A professor emeritus of astronomy and physics at Stonehill College in North Easton, Massachusetts, He is the author of more than eight books on science, including the highly-praised An Intimate Look at the Night Sky, 365 Starry Nights, The Soul of the Night, Honey from Stone, and Skeptics and True Believers. Since 1985, he has written Science Musings for the Boston Globe, a weekly science and nature column reflecting upon the human side of science. Chet Raymo and his wife Maureen live in North Easton, Massachusetts. In Walking Zero, Chet Raymo uses the Prime Meridian--the line of zero longitude and the standard for all the world's maps and clocks--to tell the story of humankind's intellectual journey from a cosmos not much larger than ourselves to the universe of the galaxies and geologic eons.

Raymo connects personally with the story by walking England's Prime Meridian from Brighton through Greenwich to the North Sea. The Prime Meridian passes near a surprising number of landmarks that loom large in science: Isaac Newton's chambers at Trinity College, Cambridge; Charles Darwin's home at Down, in Kent; the site where the first dinosaur fossils were discovered; and John Harrison's clocks in a museum room of the Royal Observatory, among many others. Visiting them in turn, Raymo brings to life the human dramas of courageous individuals who bucked reigning orthodoxies to expand our horizons, including one brave rebel who paid the ultimate price for surmising the multitude of worlds we now take for granted.

A short history of astronomy and geology, Walking Zero illuminates the startling interplay of science, psychology, faith, and the arts in our understanding of space and time. Raymo has written a book of patience and place, of the small pieces that combine to help one understand the larger world.--Los Angeles Times A lyric, affectionate tour of the universe.--Boston Globe Raymo has prepared this clever masterpiece to give readers a brief but important taste of pre-1900 scientific history done in England near the Prime Meridian, from the English Channel to the North Sea . . . A major theme emphasizes the expansion of one's awareness of local areas and human lifetimes toward a global awareness and an appreciation of the grander scale of the universe in space and time. The index and the chapter bibliographies help researchers immensely in finding the names, places, ideas, and references used. The diagrams and black-and-white pictures clarify specific items mentioned, the geography of Britain, and certain astronomical terms . . . Recommended.--F. Potter, CHOICE Magazine A brief history of science, in the context of a walking tour along the Greenwich meridian. Raymo, an astronomy and physics professor, points out that the Prime Meridian passes through several sites important to the history of science. Beginning at Brighton, he headed north along the numerous walking paths that crisscross the English countryside. Each chapter begins with the landscape, then zooms out to look at how our sense of time and space has expanded since Greek times, when the first measurement of the earth's size was made near Alexandria. Successive scientific revolutions have progressively removed Earth and the human race from the center of the cosmos. Raymo's course brings him near sites where the first dinosaur fossils were found (forcing a revised estimate of the earth's age), near Darwin's home in Down, and near the London home of the Royal society, where Newton and other scientific giants first made their findings known. A key site is the Royal Observatory in Greenwich, where various Astronomers Royal did work that enlarged our conception of the universe, continuing the process begun by the Greek philosopher Aristarchus, whose work anticipated Copernicus. There he also finds John Harrison's clocks, which solved the problem of determining longitude at sea, and gave a reason for locating the Prime Meridian at Greenwich. The final stop is at the radio telescopes at Cambridge, where research established that the universe is some 13 billion years old. Raymo enriches his picture by including the likes of Samuel Pepys, who combined membership in the Royal Society with a career that took him to all levels of Restoration society. Like Pepys, Raymo has a good eye for colorful detail, and brings it to bear on his narrative. Well written, congenial, and full of lore--about both England and the history of science.--Kirkus Review Many sites significant in the history of science lie between London and the English Channel, some of which pertain to the fixing of 0 degrees longitude--the prime meridian--in that part of the planet. Raymo conceived the idea of perambulating the route to guide readers through not so much the sites as physical places but, rather, the science they summon. Raymo begins his narrative where the meridian crosses the coast at the famous white cliffs. With geology as his focus, Raymo eventually delves into the pioneers of that discipline, who were working near what became longitude zero, but he initially takes up the astronomy greats--from Aristarchus to Kepler--who displaced Earth from the center of the universe. Returning to the line, Raymo finds Darwin's house lies coincidentally close. After discussing evolution, Raymo tackles the origin of the longitudinal and timekeeping world: the Royal Observatory at Greenwich. Skilled, experienced science author Raymo offers an inventive entry into science history.--Gilbert Taylor, Booklist Raymo takes us on a walking tour of the prime meridian, which cuts across England from the Channel to the North Sea. Along the way, he pauses in the vicinity of the homes of scientists of historical significance and sites of momentous scientific discoveries or inventions. As he hikes along this most important of longitudes, he weaves together the story of human scientific intuition, insight, and invention spanning thousands of years, even to the history of the universe This is quite an achievement in fewer than 200 miles and an equivalent number of pages. Raymo's presentation on the history of science tied to physical landmarks along the prime meridian creates an enchanting perspective on a well-exposed topic. An excellent read for anyone interested in science, history, and hiking the English countryside.--Library Journal The latest from noted science writer Raymo isn't merely a history of the prime meridian, the zero-longitude line passing through eastern England that is the starting point for measuring both space and time on Earth. Roughly speaking, Raymo is interested in how we understand our place in the cosmos, and his walk along the prime meridian is a meditation on the evolving ways that humans have measured and understood space and time, stopping here and there at some of the most prominent landmarks in the history of science. The slender volume covers an astonishing amount of ground, ranging from the astronomers of ancient Alexandria to the fellows of the British Royal Society, from Piltdown Man to contemporary debates over relativism and scientific knowledge. The result is an unexpected combination of popular history, travelogue and intellectual memoir, as meandering and invigorating as a brisk country walk . . . the real joy is in the journey--one could hardly ask for a better travel companion than Raymo, a professor emeritus of physics and astronomy whose prose is delightfully erudite and introspective.--Publishers Weekly

Synopsis:

Noted science writer Chet Raymo explores how we found our place in space and time, and what it has meant to humankind.

In Walking Zero, Chet Raymo uses the Prime Meridian—the line of zero longitude and the standard for all the worlds maps and clocks—to tell the story of humandkinds intellectual journey from a cosmos not much larger than ourselves to the universe of the galaxies and geologic eons.

As in his highly praised The Path and Climbing Brandon, Raymo connects personally with the story by walking Englands Prime Meridian from Brighton through Greenwich to the North Sea. The Prime Meridian passes near a surprising number of landmarks that loom large in science: Isaac Newtons chambers at Trinity College, Cambridge; Charles Darwins home at Down, in Kent; the site where the first dinosaur fossils were discovered; and John Harrisons clocks in a museum room of the Royal Observatory, among many others. Visiting them in turn, Raymo brings to life the human dramas of courageous individuals who bucked reigning orthodoxies to expand our horizons, including one brave rebel who paid the ultimate price for surmising the multitude of worlds we now take for granted.

A splendid short history of astronomy and geology, Walking Zero illuminates the startling interplay of science, psychology, faith, and the arts in our understanding of space and time.

For nearly forty years, Chet Raymo has been exploring the relationship between science, nature, and the humanities as a professor, writer, illustrator, and naturalist. A professor emeritus of astronomy and physics at Stonehill College in North Easton, Massachusetts, He is the author of more than eight books on science, including the highly-praised An Intimate Look at the Night Sky, 365 Starry Nights, The Soul of the Night, Honey from Stone, and Skeptics and True Believers. Since 1985, he has written "Science Musings" for the Boston Globe, a weekly science and nature column reflecting upon the human side of science. Chet Raymo and his wife Maureen live in North Easton, Massachusetts.
In Walking Zero, Chet Raymo uses the Prime Meridian—the line of zero longitude and the standard for all the world's maps and clocks—to tell the story of humankind's intellectual journey from a cosmos not much larger than ourselves to the universe of the galaxies and geologic eons.

Raymo connects personally with the story by walking England's Prime Meridian from Brighton through Greenwich to the North Sea. The Prime Meridian passes near a surprising number of landmarks that loom large in science: Isaac Newton's chambers at Trinity College, Cambridge; Charles Darwin's home at Down, in Kent; the site where the first dinosaur fossils were discovered; and John Harrisons clocks in a museum room of the Royal Observatory, among many others. Visiting them in turn, Raymo brings to life the human dramas of courageous individuals who bucked reigning orthodoxies to expand our horizons, including one brave rebel who paid the ultimate price for surmising the multitude of worlds we now take for granted.

A short history of astronomy and geology, Walking Zero illuminates the startling interplay of science, psychology, faith, and the arts in our understanding of space and time.

"Raymo has written a book of patience and place, of the small pieces that combine to help one understand the larger world."—Los Angeles Times
 
"A lyric, affectionate tour of the universe."—Boston Globe
 
"Raymo has prepared this clever masterpiece to give readers a brief but important taste of pre-1900 scientific history done in England near the Prime Meridian, from the English Channel to the North Sea . . . A major theme emphasizes the expansion of one's awareness of local areas and human lifetimes toward a global awareness and an appreciation of the grander scale of the universe in space and time. The index and the chapter bibliographies help researchers immensely in finding the names, places, ideas, and references used. The diagrams and black-and-white pictures clarify specific items mentioned, the geography of Britain, and certain astronomical terms . . . Recommended."—F. Potter, CHOICE Magazine
 
"A brief history of science, in the context of a walking tour along the Greenwich meridian. Raymo, an astronomy and physics professor, points out that the Prime Meridian passes through several sites important to the history of science. Beginning at Brighton, he headed north along the numerous walking paths that crisscross the English countryside. Each chapter begins with the landscape, then zooms out to look at how our sense of time and space has expanded since Greek times, when the first measurement of the earth's size was made near Alexandria. Successive scientific revolutions have progressively removed Earth and the human race from the center of the cosmos. Raymo's course brings him near sites where the first dinosaur fossils were found (forcing a revised estimate of the earth's age), near Darwin's home in Down, and near the London home of the Royal society, where Newton and other scientific giants first made their findings known. A key site is the Royal Observatory in Greenwich, where various Astronomers Royal did work that enlarged our conception of the universe, continuing the process begun by the Greek philosopher Aristarchus, whose work anticipated Copernicus. There he also finds John Harrison's clocks, which solved the problem of determining longitude at sea, and gave a reason for locating the Prime Meridian at Greenwich. The final stop is at the radio telescopes at Cambridge, where research established that the universe is some 13 billion years old. Raymo enriches his picture by including the likes of Samuel Pepys, who combined membership in the Royal Society with a career that took him to all levels of Restoration society. Like Pepys, Raymo has a good eye for colorful detail, and brings it to bear on his narrative. Well written, congenial, and full of lore—about both England and the history of science."—Kirkus Review
 
"Many sites significant in the history of science lie between London and the English Channel, some of which pertain to the fixing of 0 degrees longitude—the prime meridian—in that part of the planet. Raymo conceived the idea of perambulating the route to guide readers through not so much the sites as physical places but, rather, the science they summon. Raymo begins his narrative where the meridian crosses the coast at the famous white cliffs. With geology as his focus, Raymo eventually delves into the pioneers of that discipline, who were working near what became longitude zero, but he initially takes up the astronomy greats—from Aristarchus to Kepler—who displaced Earth from the center of the universe. Returning to the line, Raymo finds Darwin's house lies coincidentally close. After discussing evolution, Raymo tackles the origin of the longitudinal and timekeeping world: the Royal Observatory at Greenwich. Skilled, experienced science author Raymo offers an inventive entry into science history."—Gilbert Taylor, Booklist
 
"Raymo takes us on a walking tour of the prime meridian, which cuts across England from the Channel to the North Sea. Along the way, he pauses in the vicinity of the homes of scientists of historical significance and sites of momentous scientific discoveries or inventions. As he hikes along this most important of longitudes, he weaves together the story of human scientific intuition, insight, and invention spanning thousands of years, even to the history of the universe! This is quite an achievement in fewer than 200 miles and an equivalent number of pages. Raymo's presentation on the history of science tied to physical landmarks along the prime meridian creates an enchanting perspective on a well-exposed topic. An excellent read for anyone interested in science, history, and hiking the English countryside."—Library Journal
 
"The latest from noted science writer Raymo isn't merely a history of the prime meridian, the zero-longitude line passing through eastern England that is the starting point for measuring both space and time on Earth. Roughly speaking, Raymo is interested in how we understand our place in the cosmos, and his walk along the prime meridian is a meditation on the evolving ways that humans have measured and understood space and time, stopping here and there at some of the most prominent landmarks in the history of science. The slender volume covers an astonishing amount of ground, ranging from the astronomers of ancient Alexandria to the fellows of the British Royal Society, from Piltdown Man to contemporary debates over relativism and scientific knowledge. The result is an unexpected combination of popular history, travelogue and intellectual memoir, as meandering and invigorating as a brisk country walk . . . the real joy is in the journey—one could hardly ask for a better travel companion than Raymo, a professor emeritus of physics and astronomy whose prose is delightfully erudite and introspective."—Publishers Weekly

About the Author

For nearly forty years, Chet Raymo has been exploring the relationship between science, nature, and the humanities as a professor, writer, illustrator and naturalist.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780802714947
Author:
Raymo, Chet
Publisher:
Walker & Company
Subject:
History
Subject:
Walking
Subject:
England
Subject:
Travel
Subject:
England Description and travel.
Subject:
Walking -- England.
Subject:
General
Subject:
History of Science-General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Hardcover
Publication Date:
May 2006
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
bandw
Pages:
208
Dimensions:
8.46 x 5.69 x 0.975 in

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Science and Mathematics » History of Science » General

Walking Zero: Discovering Cosmic Space and Time Along the Prime Meridian Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$12.00 In Stock
Product details 208 pages Walker & Company - English 9780802714947 Reviews:
"Review" by , "Raymo's presentation on the history of science tied to physical landmarks along the prime meridian creates an enchanting perspective on a well-exposed topic. An excellent read for anyone interested in science, history, and hiking the English countryside."
"Review" by , "Raymo has a goodeye for colorful detail, and brings it to bear on his narrative. Well written, congenial, and full of lore...about both England and the history of science."
"Synopsis" by , Noted science writer Chet Raymo explores how we found our place in space and time, and what it has meant to humankind.

In Walking Zero, Chet Raymo uses the Prime Meridian--the line of zero longitude and the standard for all the world's maps and clocks--to tell the story of humandkind's intellectual journey from a cosmos not much larger than ourselves to the universe of the galaxies and geologic eons.

As in his highly praised The Path and Climbing Brandon, Raymo connects personally with the story by walking England's Prime Meridian from Brighton through Greenwich to the North Sea. The Prime Meridian passes near a surprising number of landmarks that loom large in science: Isaac Newton's chambers at Trinity College, Cambridge; Charles Darwin's home at Down, in Kent; the site where the first dinosaur fossils were discovered; and John Harrison's clocks in a museum room of the Royal Observatory, among many others. Visiting them in turn, Raymo brings to life the human dramas of courageous individuals who bucked reigning orthodoxies to expand our horizons, including one brave rebel who paid the ultimate price for surmising the multitude of worlds we now take for granted.

A splendid short history of astronomy and geology, Walking Zero illuminates the startling interplay of science, psychology, faith, and the arts in our understanding of space and time.

For nearly forty years, Chet Raymo has been exploring the relationship between science, nature, and the humanities as a professor, writer, illustrator, and naturalist. A professor emeritus of astronomy and physics at Stonehill College in North Easton, Massachusetts, He is the author of more than eight books on science, including the highly-praised An Intimate Look at the Night Sky, 365 Starry Nights, The Soul of the Night, Honey from Stone, and Skeptics and True Believers. Since 1985, he has written Science Musings for the Boston Globe, a weekly science and nature column reflecting upon the human side of science. Chet Raymo and his wife Maureen live in North Easton, Massachusetts. In Walking Zero, Chet Raymo uses the Prime Meridian--the line of zero longitude and the standard for all the world's maps and clocks--to tell the story of humankind's intellectual journey from a cosmos not much larger than ourselves to the universe of the galaxies and geologic eons.

Raymo connects personally with the story by walking England's Prime Meridian from Brighton through Greenwich to the North Sea. The Prime Meridian passes near a surprising number of landmarks that loom large in science: Isaac Newton's chambers at Trinity College, Cambridge; Charles Darwin's home at Down, in Kent; the site where the first dinosaur fossils were discovered; and John Harrison's clocks in a museum room of the Royal Observatory, among many others. Visiting them in turn, Raymo brings to life the human dramas of courageous individuals who bucked reigning orthodoxies to expand our horizons, including one brave rebel who paid the ultimate price for surmising the multitude of worlds we now take for granted.

A short history of astronomy and geology, Walking Zero illuminates the startling interplay of science, psychology, faith, and the arts in our understanding of space and time. Raymo has written a book of patience and place, of the small pieces that combine to help one understand the larger world.--Los Angeles Times A lyric, affectionate tour of the universe.--Boston Globe Raymo has prepared this clever masterpiece to give readers a brief but important taste of pre-1900 scientific history done in England near the Prime Meridian, from the English Channel to the North Sea . . . A major theme emphasizes the expansion of one's awareness of local areas and human lifetimes toward a global awareness and an appreciation of the grander scale of the universe in space and time. The index and the chapter bibliographies help researchers immensely in finding the names, places, ideas, and references used. The diagrams and black-and-white pictures clarify specific items mentioned, the geography of Britain, and certain astronomical terms . . . Recommended.--F. Potter, CHOICE Magazine A brief history of science, in the context of a walking tour along the Greenwich meridian. Raymo, an astronomy and physics professor, points out that the Prime Meridian passes through several sites important to the history of science. Beginning at Brighton, he headed north along the numerous walking paths that crisscross the English countryside. Each chapter begins with the landscape, then zooms out to look at how our sense of time and space has expanded since Greek times, when the first measurement of the earth's size was made near Alexandria. Successive scientific revolutions have progressively removed Earth and the human race from the center of the cosmos. Raymo's course brings him near sites where the first dinosaur fossils were found (forcing a revised estimate of the earth's age), near Darwin's home in Down, and near the London home of the Royal society, where Newton and other scientific giants first made their findings known. A key site is the Royal Observatory in Greenwich, where various Astronomers Royal did work that enlarged our conception of the universe, continuing the process begun by the Greek philosopher Aristarchus, whose work anticipated Copernicus. There he also finds John Harrison's clocks, which solved the problem of determining longitude at sea, and gave a reason for locating the Prime Meridian at Greenwich. The final stop is at the radio telescopes at Cambridge, where research established that the universe is some 13 billion years old. Raymo enriches his picture by including the likes of Samuel Pepys, who combined membership in the Royal Society with a career that took him to all levels of Restoration society. Like Pepys, Raymo has a good eye for colorful detail, and brings it to bear on his narrative. Well written, congenial, and full of lore--about both England and the history of science.--Kirkus Review Many sites significant in the history of science lie between London and the English Channel, some of which pertain to the fixing of 0 degrees longitude--the prime meridian--in that part of the planet. Raymo conceived the idea of perambulating the route to guide readers through not so much the sites as physical places but, rather, the science they summon. Raymo begins his narrative where the meridian crosses the coast at the famous white cliffs. With geology as his focus, Raymo eventually delves into the pioneers of that discipline, who were working near what became longitude zero, but he initially takes up the astronomy greats--from Aristarchus to Kepler--who displaced Earth from the center of the universe. Returning to the line, Raymo finds Darwin's house lies coincidentally close. After discussing evolution, Raymo tackles the origin of the longitudinal and timekeeping world: the Royal Observatory at Greenwich. Skilled, experienced science author Raymo offers an inventive entry into science history.--Gilbert Taylor, Booklist Raymo takes us on a walking tour of the prime meridian, which cuts across England from the Channel to the North Sea. Along the way, he pauses in the vicinity of the homes of scientists of historical significance and sites of momentous scientific discoveries or inventions. As he hikes along this most important of longitudes, he weaves together the story of human scientific intuition, insight, and invention spanning thousands of years, even to the history of the universe This is quite an achievement in fewer than 200 miles and an equivalent number of pages. Raymo's presentation on the history of science tied to physical landmarks along the prime meridian creates an enchanting perspective on a well-exposed topic. An excellent read for anyone interested in science, history, and hiking the English countryside.--Library Journal The latest from noted science writer Raymo isn't merely a history of the prime meridian, the zero-longitude line passing through eastern England that is the starting point for measuring both space and time on Earth. Roughly speaking, Raymo is interested in how we understand our place in the cosmos, and his walk along the prime meridian is a meditation on the evolving ways that humans have measured and understood space and time, stopping here and there at some of the most prominent landmarks in the history of science. The slender volume covers an astonishing amount of ground, ranging from the astronomers of ancient Alexandria to the fellows of the British Royal Society, from Piltdown Man to contemporary debates over relativism and scientific knowledge. The result is an unexpected combination of popular history, travelogue and intellectual memoir, as meandering and invigorating as a brisk country walk . . . the real joy is in the journey--one could hardly ask for a better travel companion than Raymo, a professor emeritus of physics and astronomy whose prose is delightfully erudite and introspective.--Publishers Weekly

"Synopsis" by ,
Noted science writer Chet Raymo explores how we found our place in space and time, and what it has meant to humankind.

In Walking Zero, Chet Raymo uses the Prime Meridian—the line of zero longitude and the standard for all the worlds maps and clocks—to tell the story of humandkinds intellectual journey from a cosmos not much larger than ourselves to the universe of the galaxies and geologic eons.

As in his highly praised The Path and Climbing Brandon, Raymo connects personally with the story by walking Englands Prime Meridian from Brighton through Greenwich to the North Sea. The Prime Meridian passes near a surprising number of landmarks that loom large in science: Isaac Newtons chambers at Trinity College, Cambridge; Charles Darwins home at Down, in Kent; the site where the first dinosaur fossils were discovered; and John Harrisons clocks in a museum room of the Royal Observatory, among many others. Visiting them in turn, Raymo brings to life the human dramas of courageous individuals who bucked reigning orthodoxies to expand our horizons, including one brave rebel who paid the ultimate price for surmising the multitude of worlds we now take for granted.

A splendid short history of astronomy and geology, Walking Zero illuminates the startling interplay of science, psychology, faith, and the arts in our understanding of space and time.

For nearly forty years, Chet Raymo has been exploring the relationship between science, nature, and the humanities as a professor, writer, illustrator, and naturalist. A professor emeritus of astronomy and physics at Stonehill College in North Easton, Massachusetts, He is the author of more than eight books on science, including the highly-praised An Intimate Look at the Night Sky, 365 Starry Nights, The Soul of the Night, Honey from Stone, and Skeptics and True Believers. Since 1985, he has written "Science Musings" for the Boston Globe, a weekly science and nature column reflecting upon the human side of science. Chet Raymo and his wife Maureen live in North Easton, Massachusetts.
In Walking Zero, Chet Raymo uses the Prime Meridian—the line of zero longitude and the standard for all the world's maps and clocks—to tell the story of humankind's intellectual journey from a cosmos not much larger than ourselves to the universe of the galaxies and geologic eons.

Raymo connects personally with the story by walking England's Prime Meridian from Brighton through Greenwich to the North Sea. The Prime Meridian passes near a surprising number of landmarks that loom large in science: Isaac Newton's chambers at Trinity College, Cambridge; Charles Darwin's home at Down, in Kent; the site where the first dinosaur fossils were discovered; and John Harrisons clocks in a museum room of the Royal Observatory, among many others. Visiting them in turn, Raymo brings to life the human dramas of courageous individuals who bucked reigning orthodoxies to expand our horizons, including one brave rebel who paid the ultimate price for surmising the multitude of worlds we now take for granted.

A short history of astronomy and geology, Walking Zero illuminates the startling interplay of science, psychology, faith, and the arts in our understanding of space and time.

"Raymo has written a book of patience and place, of the small pieces that combine to help one understand the larger world."—Los Angeles Times
 
"A lyric, affectionate tour of the universe."—Boston Globe
 
"Raymo has prepared this clever masterpiece to give readers a brief but important taste of pre-1900 scientific history done in England near the Prime Meridian, from the English Channel to the North Sea . . . A major theme emphasizes the expansion of one's awareness of local areas and human lifetimes toward a global awareness and an appreciation of the grander scale of the universe in space and time. The index and the chapter bibliographies help researchers immensely in finding the names, places, ideas, and references used. The diagrams and black-and-white pictures clarify specific items mentioned, the geography of Britain, and certain astronomical terms . . . Recommended."—F. Potter, CHOICE Magazine
 
"A brief history of science, in the context of a walking tour along the Greenwich meridian. Raymo, an astronomy and physics professor, points out that the Prime Meridian passes through several sites important to the history of science. Beginning at Brighton, he headed north along the numerous walking paths that crisscross the English countryside. Each chapter begins with the landscape, then zooms out to look at how our sense of time and space has expanded since Greek times, when the first measurement of the earth's size was made near Alexandria. Successive scientific revolutions have progressively removed Earth and the human race from the center of the cosmos. Raymo's course brings him near sites where the first dinosaur fossils were found (forcing a revised estimate of the earth's age), near Darwin's home in Down, and near the London home of the Royal society, where Newton and other scientific giants first made their findings known. A key site is the Royal Observatory in Greenwich, where various Astronomers Royal did work that enlarged our conception of the universe, continuing the process begun by the Greek philosopher Aristarchus, whose work anticipated Copernicus. There he also finds John Harrison's clocks, which solved the problem of determining longitude at sea, and gave a reason for locating the Prime Meridian at Greenwich. The final stop is at the radio telescopes at Cambridge, where research established that the universe is some 13 billion years old. Raymo enriches his picture by including the likes of Samuel Pepys, who combined membership in the Royal Society with a career that took him to all levels of Restoration society. Like Pepys, Raymo has a good eye for colorful detail, and brings it to bear on his narrative. Well written, congenial, and full of lore—about both England and the history of science."—Kirkus Review
 
"Many sites significant in the history of science lie between London and the English Channel, some of which pertain to the fixing of 0 degrees longitude—the prime meridian—in that part of the planet. Raymo conceived the idea of perambulating the route to guide readers through not so much the sites as physical places but, rather, the science they summon. Raymo begins his narrative where the meridian crosses the coast at the famous white cliffs. With geology as his focus, Raymo eventually delves into the pioneers of that discipline, who were working near what became longitude zero, but he initially takes up the astronomy greats—from Aristarchus to Kepler—who displaced Earth from the center of the universe. Returning to the line, Raymo finds Darwin's house lies coincidentally close. After discussing evolution, Raymo tackles the origin of the longitudinal and timekeeping world: the Royal Observatory at Greenwich. Skilled, experienced science author Raymo offers an inventive entry into science history."—Gilbert Taylor, Booklist
 
"Raymo takes us on a walking tour of the prime meridian, which cuts across England from the Channel to the North Sea. Along the way, he pauses in the vicinity of the homes of scientists of historical significance and sites of momentous scientific discoveries or inventions. As he hikes along this most important of longitudes, he weaves together the story of human scientific intuition, insight, and invention spanning thousands of years, even to the history of the universe! This is quite an achievement in fewer than 200 miles and an equivalent number of pages. Raymo's presentation on the history of science tied to physical landmarks along the prime meridian creates an enchanting perspective on a well-exposed topic. An excellent read for anyone interested in science, history, and hiking the English countryside."—Library Journal
 
"The latest from noted science writer Raymo isn't merely a history of the prime meridian, the zero-longitude line passing through eastern England that is the starting point for measuring both space and time on Earth. Roughly speaking, Raymo is interested in how we understand our place in the cosmos, and his walk along the prime meridian is a meditation on the evolving ways that humans have measured and understood space and time, stopping here and there at some of the most prominent landmarks in the history of science. The slender volume covers an astonishing amount of ground, ranging from the astronomers of ancient Alexandria to the fellows of the British Royal Society, from Piltdown Man to contemporary debates over relativism and scientific knowledge. The result is an unexpected combination of popular history, travelogue and intellectual memoir, as meandering and invigorating as a brisk country walk . . . the real joy is in the journey—one could hardly ask for a better travel companion than Raymo, a professor emeritus of physics and astronomy whose prose is delightfully erudite and introspective."—Publishers Weekly

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