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Cook: The Extraordinary Voyages of Captain James Cook

Cook: The Extraordinary Voyages of Captain James Cook Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

"Deep in its research, broad in its sympathies, imaginative in its reconstruction of events and thought processes and graceful in its prose style, Cook presents a winning combination of qualities."-- The New York Times Book Review

Commonly regarded as the greatest sea explorer of all time, James Cook made his three world-changing voyages during the 1770s, at a time when ships were routinely lost around the English coast. He made history by making geography-- sailing through previously unknown southern seas, charting the eastern Australian coast and circumnavigating New Zealand, putting many Pacific islands on the map, and exploring both the Arctic and Antarctic. His men suffered near shipwreck, were ravaged by tropical diseases, and survived frozen oceans; his lieutenants-- including George Vancouver and William Bligh-- became celebrated captains in their own right. Exploits among native peoples combined to make Cook a celebrity and a legend.

Cook is not, however, viewed by all as a heroic figure. Some Hawaiians demonize him as a syphilitic rascist who had a catastrophic effect on local health. Indigenous Australians often see him as the violent dispossessor of their lands. Nicholas Thomas explores Cook's contradictory character as never before, by reconstructing the many sides of encounters that were curious and unusual for Europeans and natives alike. The result of twenty years' research, Thomas's magnificently rich portrait overturns the familiar images of Cook and reveals the fascinating and far more ambiguous figure beneath.

Nicholas Thomas is a professor of anthropology at the University of London. A native of Sydney, Australia, he has traveled extensively in the course of his Pacific research and has curated several exhibitions on the history, art, and culture of Oceania.

"The definitive volume for this moment in our history."-- Simon Winchester, The Globe and Mail

"Thomas helps to bring this most enigmatic of men to life."-- Chicago Tribune

"[Thomas] offers a different and compelling look at the naval captain."-- The Dallas Morning News

"Rich, vivid and deeply provocative, Thomas's work combines premiere adventure story with thorough history and intensive sociology .... Thomas displays sure, careful research and thoughtful interpretations, with a style matching the adventures detailed. He spent two decades on this work, and it shows."-- Publishers Weekly (starred review)

"This is a definitive book on a mythic character."-- Science News

"An extraordinary biography .... Brave, stubborn, eaten by curiosity, occasionally the victim of his own inner furies, Cook emerges from this splendidly written volume as a greater hero than we thought, though with larger flaws."-- Islands

Synopsis:

Commonly regarded as the greatest sea explorer of all time, James Cook made his three world-changing voyages during the 1770s, at a time when ships were routinely lost around the English coast. He made history by making geography-- sailing through previously unknown southern seas, charting the eastern Australian coast and circumnavigating New Zealand, putting many Pacific islands on the map, and exploring both the Arctic and Antarctic. His men suffered near shipwreck, were ravaged by tropical diseases, and survived frozen oceans; his lieutenants-- including George Vancouver and William Bligh-- became celebrated captains in their own right. Exploits among native peoples combined to make Cook a celebrity and a legend.

Cook is not, however, viewed by all as a heroic figure. Some Hawaiians demonize him as a syphilitic rascist who had a catastrophic effect on local health. Indigenous Australians often see him as the violent dispossessor of their lands. Nicholas Thomas explores Cook's contradictory character as never before, by reconstructing the many sides of encounters that were curious and unusual for Europeans and natives alike. The result of twenty years' research, Thomas's magnificently rich portrait overturns the familiar images of Cook and reveals the fascinating and far more ambiguous figure beneath.

Synopsis:

Commonly regarded as the greatest sea explorer of all time, Cook made his famous voyages at a time when ships were routinely lost around the English coast. He made history by making geography--sailing through previously unknown southern seas, charting the eastern Australian coast and circumnavigating New Zealand, putting many Pacific islands on the map, and exploring both the Arctic and Antarctic. His men suffered near shipwreck, were ravaged by tropical diseases, and survived frozen oceans; his lieutenants--including George Vancouver and William Bligh--became celebrated captains in their own right, while his naturalist, Joseph Banks, became one of his era's greatest scientists. Exploits among the native peoples of the Pacific, Australia, and northwest America combined to make Cook a celebrity, a legend, and a hero. The result of twenty years' research, Nicholas Thomas's took is the definitive chronicle of the three world-changing voyages made by Captain James Cook during the 1770s. Through bold and original insights, Thomas breathes life into the complex and controversial legacy of an often-misunderstood man.

About the Author

Nicholas Thomas is a professor of anthropology at the University of London. A native of Sydney, Australia, he has traveled extensively in the course of his Pacific research and has curated several exhibitions on the history, art, and culture of Oceania.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780802777119
Subtitle:
The Extraordinary Voyages of Captain James Cook
Publisher:
Walker & Company
Author:
Thomas, Nicholas
Subject:
Adventurers & Explorers
Subject:
Essays & Travelogues
Subject:
Maritime History
Subject:
Expeditions & Discoveries
Subject:
Oceania
Subject:
Essays
Subject:
Travelogues
Edition Description:
Trade Paperback
Publication Date:
20040901
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Black-and-white images
Pages:
506
Dimensions:
9.25 x 6.13 in

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Exploration » General
Transportation » Nautical » General
Travel » Travel Writing » Exploration

Cook: The Extraordinary Voyages of Captain James Cook
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Product details 506 pages Walker & Company - English 9780802777119 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
Commonly regarded as the greatest sea explorer of all time, James Cook made his three world-changing voyages during the 1770s, at a time when ships were routinely lost around the English coast. He made history by making geography-- sailing through previously unknown southern seas, charting the eastern Australian coast and circumnavigating New Zealand, putting many Pacific islands on the map, and exploring both the Arctic and Antarctic. His men suffered near shipwreck, were ravaged by tropical diseases, and survived frozen oceans; his lieutenants-- including George Vancouver and William Bligh-- became celebrated captains in their own right. Exploits among native peoples combined to make Cook a celebrity and a legend.

Cook is not, however, viewed by all as a heroic figure. Some Hawaiians demonize him as a syphilitic rascist who had a catastrophic effect on local health. Indigenous Australians often see him as the violent dispossessor of their lands. Nicholas Thomas explores Cook's contradictory character as never before, by reconstructing the many sides of encounters that were curious and unusual for Europeans and natives alike. The result of twenty years' research, Thomas's magnificently rich portrait overturns the familiar images of Cook and reveals the fascinating and far more ambiguous figure beneath.

"Synopsis" by , Commonly regarded as the greatest sea explorer of all time, Cook made his famous voyages at a time when ships were routinely lost around the English coast. He made history by making geography--sailing through previously unknown southern seas, charting the eastern Australian coast and circumnavigating New Zealand, putting many Pacific islands on the map, and exploring both the Arctic and Antarctic. His men suffered near shipwreck, were ravaged by tropical diseases, and survived frozen oceans; his lieutenants--including George Vancouver and William Bligh--became celebrated captains in their own right, while his naturalist, Joseph Banks, became one of his era's greatest scientists. Exploits among the native peoples of the Pacific, Australia, and northwest America combined to make Cook a celebrity, a legend, and a hero. The result of twenty years' research, Nicholas Thomas's took is the definitive chronicle of the three world-changing voyages made by Captain James Cook during the 1770s. Through bold and original insights, Thomas breathes life into the complex and controversial legacy of an often-misunderstood man.
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