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Extraordinary

by

Extraordinary Cover

ISBN13: 9780803733725
ISBN10: 0803733720
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

For fans of Beautiful Creatures and Wicked Lovely, New York Times Bestselling author Nancy Werlin delivers a captivating novel of friendship and trust, where the past determines the future and a generations-old curse requires the ultimate sacrifice.

 

 

Phoebe is drawn to Mallory, the strange and secretive new girl at school. Soon the two become as close as sisters . . . until Mallorys magnetic older brother, Ryland, arrives. Ryland has an immediate hold on Phoebe — but it turns into something dangerous, as she begins to question her feelings about her best friend and, worse, about herself. Soon Phoebe discovers the shocking, fantastical truth about Ryland and Mallory, and about an age-old debt shes meant to pay. Will she be strong enough to save herself from the curse? Intensely page-turning, this follow-up to Nancy Werlins acclaimed novel Impossible links the real and the otherworldly in a story that is suspenseful, conversation-starting, and utterly alluring. Continue reading about the Fairy Realm in Werlins Unthinkable.

“Werlin raises interesting questions about honesty, love, and what it truly means to be extraordinary” —Publishers Weekly

 

“Werlin crafts her characters so deftly and unrolls the story so cleverly that...readers will be under the spell till the end.” —Booklist

 

“As she did in Impossible Werlin smoothly blends contemporary realism and fantasy.” —The Horn Book

 

Review:

"Phoebe Rothschild is a descendant of Mayer Rothschild, the 18th-century founder of a banking dynasty. In seventh grade, she befriends Mallory, and the two become close as sisters. But Mallory has a secret: she is a faerie, and her mission is to sabotage Phoebe's self-worth. Mallory is unable to get the job done, so years later her handsome brother, Ryland, arrives and uses glamour to get Phoebe to fall for him. The plot rests, shakily, on backstory about a bargain Mayer Rothschild struck with the faerie queen two centuries earlier: she would give him five extraordinary sons in exchange for one ordinary female heir to be sacrificed to the faerie kingdom. The passages in which Ryland verbally attacks the stout, plain Phoebe are painful reading: 'There's just something really wrong with you,' Ryland tells her. 'Phoebe had been absolutely naked when he'd said this.' Though Werlin (Impossible) raises interesting questions about honesty, love, and what it truly means to be 'extraordinary,' those topics get lost amid the slow pace and dialogue that sacrifices realism for emotional heft. Ages 12 — up. (Sept.) Combine a title like Fear with a name like Stine, and most readers will naturally assume this collection is filled with supernatural terrors. And for many of these 13 original stories, they would be right. Heather Brewer's 'Shadow Children' reveals a dark 'below' world, where creatures posing as real children await. 'She's Different Tonight' by Heather Graham concerns the impending horror a teenage werewolf plans to wreak on a girl (before things go very awry), and in Alane Ferguson's 'Dragonfly Eyes,' a girl who has just been murdered finds she can keep the tragedy from worsening. But not all fears require the paranormal: Meg Cabot's 'The Night Hunter'--a thinly veiled take on Batman--follows a mall clerk who tries to intervene in a robbery, and Walter Sorrells tells the story of a college hopeful in the middle of a highly illegal and dangerous act in order to secure tuition money. Many genres are represented, and each story (including Stine's, which opens the book) offers chills, though seldom getting too gruesome. Readers seeking diverse sources of suspense will most appreciate this collection. Ages 12 — up. (Sept.) Not even three wishes can save this magical adventure. Pike, a prolific author of teen horror in the 1980s and '90s, takes things abroad when 15-year-old Sara Wilcox travels to Turkey with her emotionally distant father, who is there on business. Left to her own devices, Sara encounters the one-handed Amesh and quickly develops a crush on him. Together, they discover a mysterious flying carpet and, upon unlocking its secret, are whisked to a mysterious island that is home to ancient temples and powerful, treacherous djinn. Amesh falls under one djinn's sway, and to save herself and her new friend, Sara has to outmaneuver two magical races bent on destroying or possessing her. The intriguing interpretation of the djinn mythos and fast-paced plot don't make up for the main character, who starts off as a spoiled and immature American teenager ('I was a visitor to their country and I had suffered to reach their land. They could at least show me some respect by acknowledging I existed') and doesn't get much better; her staccato, exclamatory narration saps the story's sense of mystery. Ages 12 — up. (Sept.)" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright PWyxz LLC)

Synopsis:

The author of the "New York Times" bestseller "Impossible" delivers a riveting tale of friendship, romance, and the faerie realm.

Synopsis:

Phoebe finds herself drawn to Mallory, the strange and secretive new kid in school, and the two girls become as close as sisters . . . until Mallory's magnetic older brother, Ryland, shows up during their junior year. Ryland has an immediate, exciting hold on Phoebe-but a dangerous hold, for she begins to question her feelings about her best friend and, worse, about herself.

Soon she'll discover the shocking truth about Ryland and Mallory: that these two are visitors from the faerie realm who have come to collect on an age-old debt. Generations ago, the faerie queen promised Pheobe's ancestor five extraordinary sons in exchange for the sacrifice of one ordinary female heir. But in hundreds of years there hasn't been a single ordinary girl in the family, and now the faeries are dying. Could Phoebe be the first ordinary one? Could she save the faeries, or is she special enough to save herself?

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About the Author

Acclaimed author Nancy Werlin was a National Book Award Finalist for Rules of Survival and winner of the Edgar Award for The Killer's Cousin. She lives in Melrose, Massachusetts.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 2 comments:

Courtesy of Mother Daughter Book Club com, December 9, 2010 (view all comments by Courtesy of Mother Daughter Book Club com)
When Mallory leaves the world of faeries to befriend a human named Phoebe Rothschild, her only thought is securing the future of her people. But as she gets to know Phoebe she wavers in her purpose, so her brother Ryland is sent in to do what Mallory cannot. With the future of the faerie kingdom at stake, he knows he must not fail, even if it means manipulating Phoebe and isolating her from her family and her beliefs about herself.

Extraordinary by Nancy Werlin straddles the world of fantasy and reality with a look at how vulnerable teen girls can be to undue influence from friends and boyfriends. All Phoebe knows is that Mallory is her friend, the sister she never had. They do everything together, and because Phoebe lacks self-confidence, she often goes along with anything Mallory suggests.

Then everything changes when Ryland comes into the picture. Ryland is manipulative and abusive, yet Phoebe is fascinated by him and wants to please him. He isolates Phoebe from her family and turns her against Mallory. Under his influence, Phoebe hardly recognizes herself or understands the things she’s willing to do at his request.

Ryland has a magical advantage in turning Phoebe to his will; even so, this should be a great issue to discuss in a mother-daughter book club with girls who are 14 and older and may be starting to date. Some questions to ask include: How can you tell the difference between a caring relationship and one that’s manipulative? What made Phoebe so vulnerable to control? What could she have done differently?

These are major issues for teens, who may be venturing into new relationships without parental oversight for the first time ever. Phoebe is an interesting character to discuss—she’s kind, she’s thoughtful, she’s not overly focused on material possessions. Her mother is a strong role model for her, yet Phoebe must also realize that she needs strength of character and belief in her own abilities to succeed as she grows.

There’s so much more to talk about, including Mallory and Phoebe’s relationship, the faerie world, an ancient pact and a discussion of what it means to be ordinary as compared to extraordinary. I highly recommend it.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(1 of 1 readers found this comment helpful)
Debbi, September 26, 2010 (view all comments by Debbi)
Nancy Werlin has done it again. Extraordinary is a suggested Young Adult title, but it is SO much more. Adults will appreciate this as least as much as the younger readers. Extraordinary is magical realism at it's best!
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(3 of 4 readers found this comment helpful)
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780803733725
Author:
Werlin, Nancy
Publisher:
Dial
Subject:
Fantasy & Magic
Subject:
Social Issues - Friendship
Subject:
Love & Romance
Subject:
Science Fiction, Fantasy, & Magic
Subject:
Children s-Science Fiction and Fantasy
Edition Description:
Hardback
Publication Date:
20100907
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
from 7 up to AND UP
Language:
English
Pages:
400
Dimensions:
8.64x6.60x1.23 in. 1.12 lbs.
Age Level:
12-12

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Related Subjects

Children's » General
Children's » Science Fiction and Fantasy » General
Young Adult » Fiction » Social Issues » Friendship
Young Adult » General

Extraordinary Used Hardcover
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Product details 400 pages Dial Books - English 9780803733725 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Phoebe Rothschild is a descendant of Mayer Rothschild, the 18th-century founder of a banking dynasty. In seventh grade, she befriends Mallory, and the two become close as sisters. But Mallory has a secret: she is a faerie, and her mission is to sabotage Phoebe's self-worth. Mallory is unable to get the job done, so years later her handsome brother, Ryland, arrives and uses glamour to get Phoebe to fall for him. The plot rests, shakily, on backstory about a bargain Mayer Rothschild struck with the faerie queen two centuries earlier: she would give him five extraordinary sons in exchange for one ordinary female heir to be sacrificed to the faerie kingdom. The passages in which Ryland verbally attacks the stout, plain Phoebe are painful reading: 'There's just something really wrong with you,' Ryland tells her. 'Phoebe had been absolutely naked when he'd said this.' Though Werlin (Impossible) raises interesting questions about honesty, love, and what it truly means to be 'extraordinary,' those topics get lost amid the slow pace and dialogue that sacrifices realism for emotional heft. Ages 12 — up. (Sept.) Combine a title like Fear with a name like Stine, and most readers will naturally assume this collection is filled with supernatural terrors. And for many of these 13 original stories, they would be right. Heather Brewer's 'Shadow Children' reveals a dark 'below' world, where creatures posing as real children await. 'She's Different Tonight' by Heather Graham concerns the impending horror a teenage werewolf plans to wreak on a girl (before things go very awry), and in Alane Ferguson's 'Dragonfly Eyes,' a girl who has just been murdered finds she can keep the tragedy from worsening. But not all fears require the paranormal: Meg Cabot's 'The Night Hunter'--a thinly veiled take on Batman--follows a mall clerk who tries to intervene in a robbery, and Walter Sorrells tells the story of a college hopeful in the middle of a highly illegal and dangerous act in order to secure tuition money. Many genres are represented, and each story (including Stine's, which opens the book) offers chills, though seldom getting too gruesome. Readers seeking diverse sources of suspense will most appreciate this collection. Ages 12 — up. (Sept.) Not even three wishes can save this magical adventure. Pike, a prolific author of teen horror in the 1980s and '90s, takes things abroad when 15-year-old Sara Wilcox travels to Turkey with her emotionally distant father, who is there on business. Left to her own devices, Sara encounters the one-handed Amesh and quickly develops a crush on him. Together, they discover a mysterious flying carpet and, upon unlocking its secret, are whisked to a mysterious island that is home to ancient temples and powerful, treacherous djinn. Amesh falls under one djinn's sway, and to save herself and her new friend, Sara has to outmaneuver two magical races bent on destroying or possessing her. The intriguing interpretation of the djinn mythos and fast-paced plot don't make up for the main character, who starts off as a spoiled and immature American teenager ('I was a visitor to their country and I had suffered to reach their land. They could at least show me some respect by acknowledging I existed') and doesn't get much better; her staccato, exclamatory narration saps the story's sense of mystery. Ages 12 — up. (Sept.)" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright PWyxz LLC)
"Synopsis" by , The author of the "New York Times" bestseller "Impossible" delivers a riveting tale of friendship, romance, and the faerie realm.
"Synopsis" by ,
Phoebe finds herself drawn to Mallory, the strange and secretive new kid in school, and the two girls become as close as sisters . . . until Mallory's magnetic older brother, Ryland, shows up during their junior year. Ryland has an immediate, exciting hold on Phoebe-but a dangerous hold, for she begins to question her feelings about her best friend and, worse, about herself.

Soon she'll discover the shocking truth about Ryland and Mallory: that these two are visitors from the faerie realm who have come to collect on an age-old debt. Generations ago, the faerie queen promised Pheobe's ancestor five extraordinary sons in exchange for the sacrifice of one ordinary female heir. But in hundreds of years there hasn't been a single ordinary girl in the family, and now the faeries are dying. Could Phoebe be the first ordinary one? Could she save the faeries, or is she special enough to save herself?

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