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Original Essays | September 17, 2014

Merritt Tierce: IMG Has My Husband Read It?



My first novel, Love Me Back, was published on September 16. Writing the book took seven years, and along the way three chapters were published in... Continue »
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Korea: The Impossible Country

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Korea: The Impossible Country Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

andlt;bandgt;South Korea's amazing rise from the ashes: the inside story of an economic, political, and cultural phenomenonandlt;/bandgt;andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;Long overshadowed by Japan and China, South Korea is a small country that happens to be one of the great national success stories of the postwar period. From a failed state with no democratic tradition, ruined and partitioned by war, and sapped by a half-century of colonial rule, South Korea transformed itself in just fifty years into an economic powerhouse and a democracy that serves as a model for other countries. With no natural resources and a tradition of authoritarian rule, Korea managed to accomplish a second Asian miracle.andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;Daniel Tudor is a journalist who has lived in and written about Korea for almost a decade. In andlt;Iandgt;Korea: The Impossible Countryandlt;/Iandgt;, Tudor examines Korea's cultural foundations; the Korean character; the public sphere in politics, business, and the workplace as well as the family, dating, and marriage. In doing so, he touches on topics as diverse as shamanism, clan-ism, the dilemma posed by North Korea, the myths about doing business in Korea, the Koreans' renowned hard-partying ethos, and why the infatuation with learning English is now causing huge social problems.andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;South Korea has undergone two miracles at once: economic development and complete democratization. The question now is, will it become as some see Japan, a rich yet aging society, devoid of energy and momentum? Or will the dynamism of Korean society and its willingness to changeand#8212;as well as the opportunity it has now to welcome outsiders into its foldand#8212;enable it to experience a third miracle that will propel it into the ranks of the world's leading nations in terms of human culture, democracy, and wealth?andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;More than just one journalist's account, andlt;iandgt;Korea: The Impossible Countryandlt;/iandgt; also draws on interviews with many of the people who made South Korea what it is today. These include:andlt;BRandgt;andlt;ulandgt;andlt;liandgt; Choi Min-sik, the star of "Old Boy".andlt;/liandgt;andlt;liandgt; Park Won-soon, Mayor of Seoul.andlt;/liandgt;andlt;liandgt; Soyeon Yi, Korea's first astronaut Hong Myung-bo, legendary captain of Korea's 2002 FIFA World Cup team.andlt;/liandgt;andlt;liandgt; Shin Joong-hyun, the 'Godfather of Korean Rock'.andlt;/liandgt;andlt;liandgt; Ko Un, poet.andlt;/liandgt;andlt;liandgt; Hong Seok-cheon, restaurateur, and the first Korean celebrity to 'come out'.andlt;/liandgt;andlt;/ulandgt;And many more, including a former advisor to President Park Chung-hee; a Shaman priestess ('mudang'); the boss of Korea's largest matchmaking agency; a 'room salon' hostess; an architect; as well as chefs, musicians, academics, entrepreneurs, homemakers, and chaebol conglomerate employees.

Synopsis:

South Korea's amazing rise from the ashes: the inside story of an economic, political, and cultural phenomenon

Long overshadowed by Japan and China, South Korea is a small country that happens to be one of the great national success stories of the postwar period. From a failed state with no democratic tradition, ruined and partitioned by war, and sapped by a half-century of colonial rule, South Korea transformed itself in just fifty years into an economic powerhouse and a democracy that serves as a model for other countries. With no natural resources and a tradition of authoritarian rule, Korea managed to accomplish a second Asian miracle.

Daniel Tudor is a journalist who has lived in and written about Korea for almost a decade. In Korea: The Impossible Country, Tudor examines Korea's cultural foundations; the Korean character; the public sphere in politics, business, and the workplace as well as the family, dating, and marriage. In doing so, he touches on topics as diverse as shamanism, clan-ism, the dilemma posed by North Korea, the myths about doing business in Korea, the Koreans' renowned hard-partying ethos, and why the infatuation with learning English is now causing huge social problems.

South Korea has undergone two miracles at once: economic development and complete democratization. The question now is, will it become as some see Japan, a rich yet aging society, devoid of energy and momentum? Or will the dynamism of Korean society and its willingness to change—as well as the opportunity it has now to welcome outsiders into its fold—enable it to experience a third miracle that will propel it into the ranks of the world's leading nations in terms of human culture, democracy, and wealth?

More than just one journalist's account, Korea: The Impossible Country also draws on interviews with many of the people who made South Korea what it is today. These include:

  • Choi Min-sik, the star of "Old Boy"
  • Park Won-soon, Mayor of Seoul
  • Soyeon Yi, Korea's first astronaut Hong Myung-bo, legendary captain of KoreaÆs 2002 FIFA World Cup team
  • Shin Joong-hyun, the 'Godfather of Korean Rock'
  • Ko Un, poet
  • Hong Seok-cheon, restaurateur, and the first Korean celebrity to 'come out'
And many more, including a former advisor to President Park Chung-hee; a Shaman priestess ('mudang'); the boss of Korea's largest matchmaking agency; a 'room salon' hostess; an architect; as well as chefs, musicians, academics, entrepreneurs, homemakers, and chaebol conglomerate employees.

About the Author

andlt;bandgt;Daniel Tudorandlt;/Bandgt; is a writer and journalist based in Korea, where he is the Korea correspondent for the andlt;Iandgt;Economistandlt;/Iandgt; and contributes to andlt;Iandgt;Newsweek Koreaandlt;/Iandgt; and other publications. He holds degrees from Oxford University and Manchester University in England and has worked in finance in both Korea and Switzerland.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780804842525
Author:
Tudor, Daniel
Publisher:
Tuttle Publishing
Subject:
Korea
Subject:
anthropology;cultural anthropology
Subject:
World History-Korea
Subject:
Anthropology - Cultural
Subject:
history of korea; korean history; korean people; korean history; korean business
Subject:
history of korea; korean history; korean people; korean history; korean business; korean culture
Edition Description:
Hardcover with Jacket
Series:
No Series
Publication Date:
20121131
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
16-page color insert of 28 photos
Pages:
336
Dimensions:
8 x 5.13 in

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Anthropology » Cultural Anthropology
History and Social Science » Asia » Korea
History and Social Science » World History » General
History and Social Science » World History » Korea
Science and Mathematics » Nature Studies » Birds » Birdwatching
Science and Mathematics » Nature Studies » Birds » General
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Korea: The Impossible Country New Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$22.95 In Stock
Product details 336 pages Tuttle Publishing - English 9780804842525 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , South Korea's amazing rise from the ashes: the inside story of an economic, political, and cultural phenomenon

Long overshadowed by Japan and China, South Korea is a small country that happens to be one of the great national success stories of the postwar period. From a failed state with no democratic tradition, ruined and partitioned by war, and sapped by a half-century of colonial rule, South Korea transformed itself in just fifty years into an economic powerhouse and a democracy that serves as a model for other countries. With no natural resources and a tradition of authoritarian rule, Korea managed to accomplish a second Asian miracle.

Daniel Tudor is a journalist who has lived in and written about Korea for almost a decade. In Korea: The Impossible Country, Tudor examines Korea's cultural foundations; the Korean character; the public sphere in politics, business, and the workplace as well as the family, dating, and marriage. In doing so, he touches on topics as diverse as shamanism, clan-ism, the dilemma posed by North Korea, the myths about doing business in Korea, the Koreans' renowned hard-partying ethos, and why the infatuation with learning English is now causing huge social problems.

South Korea has undergone two miracles at once: economic development and complete democratization. The question now is, will it become as some see Japan, a rich yet aging society, devoid of energy and momentum? Or will the dynamism of Korean society and its willingness to change—as well as the opportunity it has now to welcome outsiders into its fold—enable it to experience a third miracle that will propel it into the ranks of the world's leading nations in terms of human culture, democracy, and wealth?

More than just one journalist's account, Korea: The Impossible Country also draws on interviews with many of the people who made South Korea what it is today. These include:

  • Choi Min-sik, the star of "Old Boy"
  • Park Won-soon, Mayor of Seoul
  • Soyeon Yi, Korea's first astronaut Hong Myung-bo, legendary captain of KoreaÆs 2002 FIFA World Cup team
  • Shin Joong-hyun, the 'Godfather of Korean Rock'
  • Ko Un, poet
  • Hong Seok-cheon, restaurateur, and the first Korean celebrity to 'come out'
And many more, including a former advisor to President Park Chung-hee; a Shaman priestess ('mudang'); the boss of Korea's largest matchmaking agency; a 'room salon' hostess; an architect; as well as chefs, musicians, academics, entrepreneurs, homemakers, and chaebol conglomerate employees.
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