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Drinking the Sea at Gaza: Days and Nights in a Land Under Siege

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Drinking the Sea at Gaza: Days and Nights in a Land Under Siege Cover

ISBN13: 9780805057409
ISBN10: 0805057404
Condition: Standard
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In 1993, amira hass, a young Israeli reporter, drove to Gaza to cover a story-and stayed, the first journalist to live in the grim Palestinian enclave so feared and despised by most Israelis that, in the local idiom, "Go to Gaza" is another way to say "Go to hell." Now, in a work of calm power and painful clarity, Hass reflects on what she has seen in Gaza's gutted streets and destitute refugee camps.

Drinking the Sea at Gaza maps the zones of ordinary Palestinian life. From her friends, Hass learns the secrets of slipping across sealed borders and stealing through night streets emptied by curfews. She shares Gaza's early euphoria over the peace process and its subsequent despair as hope gives way to unrelenting hardship. But even as Hass charts the griefs and humiliations of the Palestinians, she offers a remarkable portrait of a people not brutalized but eloquent, spiritually resilient, bleakly funny, and morally courageous.

Full of testimonies and stories, facts and impressions, Drinking the Sea at Gaza makes an urgent claim on our humanity. Beautiful, haunting, and profound, it will stand with the great works of wartime reportage, from Michael Herr's Dispatches to Rian Malan's My Traitor's Heart.

Amira Hass was born in Jerusalem in 1957, the daughter of Yugoslavian-Jewish refugees. A journalist for the Hebrew daily Ha'aretz, she now covers Gaza and the West Bank. Hass has received the UPI's International Award and the Sokolow Prize, Israel's highest honor for journalists. For her work in Gaza, she was nominated for the Robert F. Kennedy Award.

In 1993, Hass became the first Israeli journalist to live in the Gaza Strip. In this book she reflects on what she witnessed in the Strip's gutted streets and destitute refugee camps. Equal parts wartime reportage and cultural inquiry, it details ordinary Palestinian life by giving voice to Gaza's doctors, housewives, taxi drivers, farmers, union activists, and Islamic leaders.

What does it mean to live amid incessant security sweeps, a daunting blockade, and the authoritarian regime of Arafat? In searching for the answers, Hass documents family and social life in Gaza with clarity and passion.

"Shatters stereotypes . . . Hass reveals the surprising contradictions of Palestinian society."Susie Linfield, The Los Angeles Times

"Hass observes with something like despair, and writes with skill and passion."Graham Usher, The Economist

"A wonderful book, persuasively argued."Peter McKenna, The Washington Post Book World

"Not only has Amira Hass done the reporting that makes this book a moving and eloquent advocate of Palestinian humanity, but she is also a blunt and beautiful writer"Amy Wilentz, Newsday

"A fascinating book . . . Frank, unsentimental."Chicago Tribune (Editor's Choice)

"Unique and important. Hass, the 'enemy' and a woman to boot, dropped into a war zone armed with nothing but her compassion. She brought back this booka powerful, compelling portrait of a tragedy."Tom Segev, author of The Seventh Million

"Beautiful, passionate, and profoundly disturbing, Hass's book summons up the very essence of Gaza."Amos Elon, author of Founder

"She clearly depicts the problemsfrom potholes to arbitrary Palestinian policingendured by the enclave's one million people. The reportage covers the period before and after the establishment of the Palestinian Authority. Hass profiles PLO returnees, Hamas rejectionists, shopkeepers, and workers and their travails in entering Israel. Through a deep understanding of Gazans' moods of militancy and passivity, Hass ably dissects and explicates the individuated elements of a generally difficult and evolving political problem."Gilbert Taylor, Booklist

"Hass stresses political, not social, freedoms, vividly documenting the daily degradation of ID checking, security sweeps, crushing border closures that cut off the Palestinians' economic lifeline of menial jobs in Israel, and rubber bullets, tear gas, or mass arrests by an overreacting occupation army."Kirkus Reviews

Synopsis:

In 1993, Amira Hass, an Israeli reporter, drove to Gaza to cover a story — and stayed for four years. She was the first journalist to live in the grim Palestinian enclave so feared and despised by many Israelis that in the local idiom "Go to Gaza" is another way to say "Go to hell". Now, in a work of calm power and painful clarity, Hass reflects on everyday life in Gaza's gutted streets and destitute refugee camps. She gives voice to Gaza's doctors and housewives, its taxi drivers, farmers, and Islamic leaders. She writes about slipping across sealed borders and stealing through night streets emptied by curfews. And she movingly recounts Gaza's early euphoria over Palestinian autonomy and the subsequent despair as hope gives way to unrelenting hardship.<P>Full of testimonies, stories, facts, and impressions, Drinking the Sea at Gaza makes an urgent claim on our humanity. Haunting and profound, it is a landmark addition to the body of wartime reportage and Middle Eastern history.

Synopsis:

In 1993, Amira Hass, a young Israeli reporter, drove to Gaza to cover a story-and stayed, the first journalist to live in the grim Palestinian enclave so feared and despised by most Israelis that, in the local idiom, "Go to Gaza" is another way to say "Go to hell." Now, in a work of calm power and painful clarity, Hass reflects on what she has seen in the Gaza Strips's gutted streets and destitute refugee camps.

Drinking the Sea at Gaza maps the zones of ordinary Palestinian life. From her friends, Hass learns the secrets of slipping across sealed borders and stealing through night streets emptied by curfews. She shares Gaza's early euphoria over the peace process and its subsequent despair as hope gives way to unrelenting hardship. But even as Hass charts the griefs and humiliations of the Palestinians, she offers a remarkable portrait of a people not brutalized but eloquent, spiritually resilient, bleakly funny, and morally courageous.

Full of testimonies and stories, facts and impressions, Drinking the Sea at Gaza makes an urgent claim on our humanity. Beautiful, haunting, and profound, it will stand with the great works of wartime reportage.

About the Author

Amira Hass was born in Jerusalem in 1957, the daughter of Yugoslavian-Jewish refugees. A journalist for the Hebrew daily Ha'aretz, she covers Gaza and the West Bank. She received the UPI's International Award and the Sokolow Prize, Israel's highest honor for journalists. For her work in Gaza, Hass was been nominated for the Robert F. Kennedy Award

What Our Readers Are Saying

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ReaderBeware, January 28, 2011 (view all comments by ReaderBeware)
Absolute truth is handled carefully by journalists. At the heart of first-rate journalism is almost always a closely held viewpoint, on the part of the reporter, which will return again and again to the reporter's work. Amira Hass's work, then, should be regarded with skepticism: a woman of Jewish descent who was born in Israel but is reporting from the West Bank and the Gaza Strip for a newspaper printed in Hebrew -- what a mess!

The book succeeded in winning my trust because of the confidently rational style of reporting and interviewing Hass uses to unpack the situation in Gaza from top to bottom. The inner workings of a Palestinian state in its infancy are open for display. It is hard to hold on to the assumptions and ideologies I had in the face of the data presented, not just numbers but the stunning access she has to all sides. Hass is at once a scholar of Palestinian and Israeli bureaucracy, an historical researcher, a participant observer, and a hybrid citizen who speaks truth to power in Hebrew and Arabic. In *Drinking the Sea at Gaza* agendas are present everywhere, but Hass delivers proof as well as pathos amid a sea of ideology and bigotry.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780805057409
Translator:
Kaufman-Lacusta, Maxine
Translator:
Wesley, Elana
Translator:
Nunn, Maxine
Translator:
Kaufman-Lacusta, Maxine
Author:
Hass, Amira
Author:
Nunn, Maxine
Author:
Wesley, Elana
Publisher:
Picador USA
Location:
New York
Subject:
Middle East
Subject:
International Relations
Subject:
Economic Conditions
Subject:
Water-supply
Subject:
Palestinian arabs
Subject:
Arab-Israeli conflict
Subject:
Military government
Subject:
Gaza Strip
Subject:
International Relations - General
Subject:
Travel
Subject:
Arab-Israeli conflict -- 1993-
Subject:
Gaza Strip Politics and government.
Subject:
Politics-United States Foreign Policy
Subject:
Middle East - Israel
Subject:
Middle East/Israel & Palestine
Copyright:
Edition Number:
1st Owl Books ed.
Edition Description:
Trade Paper
Series Volume:
00-156
Publication Date:
20000631
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
3 maps
Pages:
400
Dimensions:
8.25 x 5.50 in

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Middle East » Arab Israeli Conflict
History and Social Science » Middle East » General History
History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » Politics » United States » Foreign Policy
History and Social Science » World History » Israel
History and Social Science » World History » Middle East

Drinking the Sea at Gaza: Days and Nights in a Land Under Siege Used Trade Paper
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Product details 400 pages Owl Books (NY) - English 9780805057409 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , In 1993, Amira Hass, an Israeli reporter, drove to Gaza to cover a story — and stayed for four years. She was the first journalist to live in the grim Palestinian enclave so feared and despised by many Israelis that in the local idiom "Go to Gaza" is another way to say "Go to hell". Now, in a work of calm power and painful clarity, Hass reflects on everyday life in Gaza's gutted streets and destitute refugee camps. She gives voice to Gaza's doctors and housewives, its taxi drivers, farmers, and Islamic leaders. She writes about slipping across sealed borders and stealing through night streets emptied by curfews. And she movingly recounts Gaza's early euphoria over Palestinian autonomy and the subsequent despair as hope gives way to unrelenting hardship.<P>Full of testimonies, stories, facts, and impressions, Drinking the Sea at Gaza makes an urgent claim on our humanity. Haunting and profound, it is a landmark addition to the body of wartime reportage and Middle Eastern history.
"Synopsis" by ,
In 1993, Amira Hass, a young Israeli reporter, drove to Gaza to cover a story-and stayed, the first journalist to live in the grim Palestinian enclave so feared and despised by most Israelis that, in the local idiom, "Go to Gaza" is another way to say "Go to hell." Now, in a work of calm power and painful clarity, Hass reflects on what she has seen in the Gaza Strips's gutted streets and destitute refugee camps.

Drinking the Sea at Gaza maps the zones of ordinary Palestinian life. From her friends, Hass learns the secrets of slipping across sealed borders and stealing through night streets emptied by curfews. She shares Gaza's early euphoria over the peace process and its subsequent despair as hope gives way to unrelenting hardship. But even as Hass charts the griefs and humiliations of the Palestinians, she offers a remarkable portrait of a people not brutalized but eloquent, spiritually resilient, bleakly funny, and morally courageous.

Full of testimonies and stories, facts and impressions, Drinking the Sea at Gaza makes an urgent claim on our humanity. Beautiful, haunting, and profound, it will stand with the great works of wartime reportage.

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