Nonficionado Sale
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN a $100 Credit

Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news
for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

Visit our stores


    Recently Viewed clear list


    Lists | May 12, 2015

    Mark Bittman: IMG Six Things You Can Do to Join the Food Movement Today



    People ask me all the time what they can do to help improve the food system. Given that some of the problems that need fixing (like unsustainable... Continue »
    1. $18.20 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

    spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$7.50
Used Hardcover
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Beaverton Humor- Narrative
1 Hawthorne Humor- General

This title in other editions

Queenan Country: A Reluctant Anglophile's Pilgrimage to the Mother Country

by

Queenan Country: A Reluctant Anglophile's Pilgrimage to the Mother Country Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In this hilarious romp through England, one of America's preeminent humorists seeks the answer to an eternal question: What makes the Brits tick?

One semitropical Fourth of July, Joe Queenan's English wife suggested that the family might like a chicken vindaloo in lieu of the customary barbecue. It was this pitiless act of gastronomic cultural oppression, coupled with dread of the fearsome Christmas pudding that awaited him for dessert, that inspired the author to make a solitary pilgrimage to Great Britain. Freed from the obligation to visit an unending procession of Aunty Margarets and Cousin Robins, as he had done for the first twenty-six years of their marriage, Queenan decided that he would not come back from Albion until he had finally penetrated the limey heart of darkness.

His trip was not in vain. Crisscrossing Old Blighty like Cromwell hunting Papists, Queenan finally came to terms with the choochiness, squiffiness, ponciness, and sticky wicketness that lie at the heart of the British character. Here he is trying to find out whose idea it was to impale King Edward II on a red-hot poker — and what this says about English sexual politics. Here he is in an Edinburgh pub foolishly trying to defend Paul McCartney's "Ebony and Ivory." And here he is, trapped in a concert hall with a Coventry-based all-Brit Eagles tribute band named Talon who resent that they are nowhere near as famous as their evil nemeses, the Illegal Eagles. At the end of his epic adventure, the author returns chastened, none the wiser, but encouraged that his wife is actually as sane as she is, in light of her fellow countrymen.

Review:

"Humorist Queenan calls this account of his 2002 trip to Great Britain 'an affectionate jeremiad,' conveying both his emotional ambivalence and displaying his favorite rhetorical device, the oxymoron. The West End musical We Will Rock You is 'triumphantly cretinous'; a village woman is 'belligerently harmless'; the museum curator wears an 'ecstatically sober dress,' etc. More broadly, contradiction is basic both to Queenan's humor and to his love-hate relationship with the British. He loves their 'arch phrasing, infectious understatement and delightful euphemisms,' just as he hates when all that posturing culminates in 'the twit,' that 'master of rehearsed eccentricity.' As with many travel accounts, one learns more about the traveler than about the locale. Queenan is a connoisseur of bad art; he can endure roomfuls of bad paintings at the Tate, just to make naughty remarks about the 'insidious' hairstyles of yesteryear. Madame Tussaud's? It's 'insufficiently absurd...nowhere near as bad as it ought to be.' Conversely, he's thrilled to book a room at Durham's 500-year-old castle, complete with ghosts and a view of the cathedral. Indeed, the 'American Dream,' as Queenan explains it, is to stand on a fog-swept London street, watching the bobbies and dodging the double-deckers. As he says, there 'isn't anything in the world better than riding a London double-decker bus.' Hand-sell to the tweedies? Agent, Joseph Vallely. (Nov. 4)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"Waxing wroth, Queenan gets our British cousins to show us their knickers. They get up his nose, so he hits our funny bones in this antic panto. With a comic crumpet, Queenan leaves his love in Albion. It's a bit of alright, Percival." Kirkus Reviews

Review:

"Queenan's is not a quickie romance; nor is this book an afterthought. It is written with the depth and detail of someone who's paid attention to his subject for a long time." Booklist

Review:

"By now, it is becoming clear that anyone who wants an accurate picture of modern Britain should look elsewhere. The book is less a pilgrimage, more a voyage round Joe Queenan's head, with guest appearances by leading landmarks and murdered kings." Allison Pearson, The New York Times Book Review

Synopsis:

In this hilarious romp through England, one of America's preeminent humorists seeks the answer to an eternal question: What makes the Brits tick?

One semitropical Fourth of July, Joe Queenan's English wife suggested that the family might like a chicken vindaloo in lieu of the customary barbecue. It was this pitiless act of gastronomic cultural oppression, coupled with dread of the fearsome Christmas pudding that awaited him for dessert, that inspired the author to make a solitary pilgrimage to Great Britain. Freed from the obligation to visit an unending procession of Aunty Margarets and Cousin Robins, as he had done for the first twenty-six years of their marriage, Queenan decided that he would not come back from Albion until he had finally penetrated the limey heart of darkness.

His trip was not in vain. Crisscrossing Old Blighty like Cromwell hunting Papists, Queenan finally came to terms with the choochiness, squiffiness, ponciness, and sticky wicketness that lie at the heart of the British character. Here he is trying to find out whose idea it was to impale King Edward II on a red-hot poker-and what this says about English sexual politics. Here he is in an Edinburgh pub foolishly trying to defend Paul McCartney's "Ebony and Ivory." And here he is, trapped in a concert hall with a Coventry-based all-Brit Eagles tribute band named Talon who resent that they are nowhere near as famous as their evil nemeses, the Illegal Eagles. At the end of his epic adventure, the author returns chastened, none the wiser, but encouraged that his wife is actually as sane as she is, in light of her fellow countrymen.

Synopsis:

One semitropical Fourth of July, Joe Queenan's English wife suggested that the family might like a chicken vindaloo in lieu of the customary barbecue. It was this pitiless act of gastronomic cultural oppression, coupled with dread of the fearsome Christmas pudding that awaited him for dessert, that inspired the author to make a solitary pilgrimage to Great Britain.

 

Freed from the obligation to visit his wife's relations, as he had done for the first twenty-six years of their marriage, Queenan decided that he would not come back from Albion until he had finally penetrated the limey heart of darkness.

The result is a very funny, picaresque adventure that will appeal to anglophile and anglophobe alike.

About the Author

The bestselling author of True Believers and Balsamic Dreams, Joe Queenan is a contributing writer at Men's Health and writes regularly for The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal. He lives in Tarrytown, New York.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780805069808
Subtitle:
A Reluctant Anglophile's Pilgrimage to the Mother Country
Author:
Queenan, Joe
Publisher:
Henry Holt and Co.
Location:
New York
Subject:
Great britain
Subject:
Travelers
Subject:
Personal Memoirs
Subject:
General Travel
Subject:
General Humor
Subject:
General
Subject:
Europe - Great Britain
Subject:
Form - Essays
Copyright:
Edition Number:
1st ed.
Edition Description:
Trade Cloth
Publication Date:
November 4, 2004
Binding:
Electronic book text in proprietary or open standard format
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
256
Dimensions:
8.25 x 5.50 in

Other books you might like

  1. It's Not Easy Bein' Me: A Lifetime... Used Hardcover $4.95
  2. Notes from a Small Island
    Used Trade Paper $5.50
  3. Stellaluna
    Used Board Book $4.50
  4. Rick Steves' Postcards from Europe:...
    Used Trade Paper $5.95
  5. A Writer's House in Wales New Hardcover $18.75
  6. An Absolutely Outrageous Adventure New Trade Paper $15.25

Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Humor » General
Arts and Entertainment » Humor » Narrative
Biography » General
Travel » Travel Writing » Europe
Travel » Travel Writing » General

Queenan Country: A Reluctant Anglophile's Pilgrimage to the Mother Country Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$7.50 In Stock
Product details 256 pages Henry Holt & Company - English 9780805069808 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Humorist Queenan calls this account of his 2002 trip to Great Britain 'an affectionate jeremiad,' conveying both his emotional ambivalence and displaying his favorite rhetorical device, the oxymoron. The West End musical We Will Rock You is 'triumphantly cretinous'; a village woman is 'belligerently harmless'; the museum curator wears an 'ecstatically sober dress,' etc. More broadly, contradiction is basic both to Queenan's humor and to his love-hate relationship with the British. He loves their 'arch phrasing, infectious understatement and delightful euphemisms,' just as he hates when all that posturing culminates in 'the twit,' that 'master of rehearsed eccentricity.' As with many travel accounts, one learns more about the traveler than about the locale. Queenan is a connoisseur of bad art; he can endure roomfuls of bad paintings at the Tate, just to make naughty remarks about the 'insidious' hairstyles of yesteryear. Madame Tussaud's? It's 'insufficiently absurd...nowhere near as bad as it ought to be.' Conversely, he's thrilled to book a room at Durham's 500-year-old castle, complete with ghosts and a view of the cathedral. Indeed, the 'American Dream,' as Queenan explains it, is to stand on a fog-swept London street, watching the bobbies and dodging the double-deckers. As he says, there 'isn't anything in the world better than riding a London double-decker bus.' Hand-sell to the tweedies? Agent, Joseph Vallely. (Nov. 4)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "Waxing wroth, Queenan gets our British cousins to show us their knickers. They get up his nose, so he hits our funny bones in this antic panto. With a comic crumpet, Queenan leaves his love in Albion. It's a bit of alright, Percival."
"Review" by , "Queenan's is not a quickie romance; nor is this book an afterthought. It is written with the depth and detail of someone who's paid attention to his subject for a long time."
"Review" by , "By now, it is becoming clear that anyone who wants an accurate picture of modern Britain should look elsewhere. The book is less a pilgrimage, more a voyage round Joe Queenan's head, with guest appearances by leading landmarks and murdered kings."
"Synopsis" by ,
In this hilarious romp through England, one of America's preeminent humorists seeks the answer to an eternal question: What makes the Brits tick?

One semitropical Fourth of July, Joe Queenan's English wife suggested that the family might like a chicken vindaloo in lieu of the customary barbecue. It was this pitiless act of gastronomic cultural oppression, coupled with dread of the fearsome Christmas pudding that awaited him for dessert, that inspired the author to make a solitary pilgrimage to Great Britain. Freed from the obligation to visit an unending procession of Aunty Margarets and Cousin Robins, as he had done for the first twenty-six years of their marriage, Queenan decided that he would not come back from Albion until he had finally penetrated the limey heart of darkness.

His trip was not in vain. Crisscrossing Old Blighty like Cromwell hunting Papists, Queenan finally came to terms with the choochiness, squiffiness, ponciness, and sticky wicketness that lie at the heart of the British character. Here he is trying to find out whose idea it was to impale King Edward II on a red-hot poker-and what this says about English sexual politics. Here he is in an Edinburgh pub foolishly trying to defend Paul McCartney's "Ebony and Ivory." And here he is, trapped in a concert hall with a Coventry-based all-Brit Eagles tribute band named Talon who resent that they are nowhere near as famous as their evil nemeses, the Illegal Eagles. At the end of his epic adventure, the author returns chastened, none the wiser, but encouraged that his wife is actually as sane as she is, in light of her fellow countrymen.

"Synopsis" by ,
One semitropical Fourth of July, Joe Queenan's English wife suggested that the family might like a chicken vindaloo in lieu of the customary barbecue. It was this pitiless act of gastronomic cultural oppression, coupled with dread of the fearsome Christmas pudding that awaited him for dessert, that inspired the author to make a solitary pilgrimage to Great Britain.

 

Freed from the obligation to visit his wife's relations, as he had done for the first twenty-six years of their marriage, Queenan decided that he would not come back from Albion until he had finally penetrated the limey heart of darkness.

The result is a very funny, picaresque adventure that will appeal to anglophile and anglophobe alike.

spacer
spacer
  • back to top

FOLLOW US ON...

     
Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.