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The Sorrows of Empire: An Empire Project

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The Sorrows of Empire: An Empire Project Cover

ISBN13: 9780805070040
ISBN10: 0805070044
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

From the author of the prophetic national bestseller Blowback, a startling look at militarism, American style, and its consequences abroad and at home

In the years after the Soviet Union imploded, the United States was described first as the globes “lone superpower,” then as a “reluctant sheriff,” next as the “indispensable nation,” and now, in the wake of 9/11, as a “New Rome.” Here, Chalmers Johnson thoroughly explores the new militarism that is transforming America and compelling its people to pick up the burden of empire.

Reminding us of the classic warnings against militarismfrom George Washingtons farewell address to Dwight Eisenhowers denunciation of the military-industrial complexJohnson uncovers its roots deep in our past. Turning to the present, he maps Americas expanding empire of military bases and the vast web of services that supports them. He offers a vivid look at the new caste of professional warriors who have infiltrated multiple branches of government, who classify as “secret” everything they do, and for whom the manipulation of the military budget is of vital interest.

Among Johnsons provocative conclusions is that American militarism is putting an end to the age of globalization and bankrupting the United States, even as it creates the conditions for a new century of virulent blowback. The Sorrows of Empire suggests that the former American republic has already crossed its Rubiconwith the Pentagon leading the way.

Chalmers Johnson is president of the Japan Policy Research Institute, a non-profit research and public affairs organization devoted to public education concerning Japan and international relations in the Pacific. He taught for thirty years, 1962-1992, at the Berkeley and San Diego campuses of the University of California and held endowed chairs in Asian politics at both of them. At Berkeley he served as chairman of the Center for Chinese Studies and as chairman of the Department of Political Science. His B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. degrees in economics and political science are all from the University of California, Berkeley.

He first visited Japan in 1953 as a U.S. Navy officer and has lived and worked there with his wife, the anthropologist Sheila K. Johnson, virtually every year since 1961. Chalmers Johnson has been honored with fellowships from the Ford Foundation, the Social Science Research Council, and the Guggenheim Foundation; and in 1976 he was elected a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He has written numerous articles and reviews and some fifteen books, including Peasant Nationalism and Communist Power on the Chinese revolution, An Instance of Treason on Japan's most famous spy, Revolutionary Change on the theory of violent protest movements, and MITI and the Japanese Miracle on Japanese economic development. This last-named book laid the foundation for the "revisionist" school of writers on Japan, and because of it the Japanese press dubbed him the "Godfather of revisionism."

He was chairman of the academic advisory committee for the PBS television series "The Pacific Century," and he played a prominent role in the PBS "Frontline" documentary "Losing the War with Japan." Both won Emmy awards. His most recent books are, as editor and contributor, Okinawa: Cold War Island; Blowback: The Costs and Consequences of American Empire (which won the 2001 American Book Award of the Before Columbus Foundation); and The Sorrows of Empire: Militarism, Secrecy, and the End of the Republic.

In the years after the Soviet Union imploded, the United States was described first as the globe's "lone superpower," then as a "reluctant sheriff," next as the "indispensable nation," and, in the wake of 9/11, as a "New Rome." Here, Chalmers Johnson thoroughly explores the new militarism that is transforming America and compelling its people to pick up the burden of empire.

Reminding us of the classic warnings against militarismfrom George Washington's Farewell Address to Dwight Eisenhower's denunciation of the military-industrial complexJohnson uncovers its roots deep in our past. Turning to the present, he maps America's expanding empire of military bases and the vast web of services that support them. He offers a vivid look at the new caste of professional militarists who have infiltrated multiple branches of government, who classify as "secret" everything they do, and for whom the manipulation of the military budget is of vital interest.

Among Johnson's provocative conclusions is that American militarism is already putting an end to the age of globalization, and bankrupting the United States even as it creates the conditions for a new century of virulent blowback. The Sorrows of Empire suggests that the former American republic has already crossed its Rubiconwith the Pentagon in the lead.

"Exhaustive . . . Johnson, an Asia scholar and onetime consultant for the CIA, [produces] voluminous research on the many United States military and intelligence outposts unknown to most Americans, and weaves a frightening picture of a military-industrial complex grown into exactly the powerful, secretive force that Dwight D. Eisenhower warned againstmade more dangerous by an aggressive executive branch, creating a state of perpetual war and economic bankruptcy. His assessment is chilling."Serge Schmemann, The New York Times Book Review

"Exhaustive . . . Johnson, an Asia scholar and onetime consultant for the CIA, [produces] voluminous research on the many United States military and intelligence outposts unknown to most Americans, and weaves a frightening picture of a military-industrial complex grown into exactly the powerful, secretive force that Dwight D. Eisenhower warned againstmade more dangerous by an aggressive executive branch, creating a state of perpetual war and economic bankruptcy. His assessment is chilling."Serge Schmemann, The New York Times Book Review

"Johnson devotes most of his book to examining the numerous foreign bases (which have proliferated since the end of the Cold War), the often legitimate reasons for their initial establishment, the outrages that American servicemen from them perpetrate on their hosts, as well as the comforts and benefits of empire and militarism that prevent their abandonment. Johnson believes that the initial post-Cold War base expansion was aimed at supporting America's century-old economic imperialism, now called 'globalization.' But with the election of the 'boy emperor' and the attacks on Sept. 11, 2001, 'the United States shifted decisively from economic to military imperialism,' which undermined international law and organizations, weakened democracy at home, replaced truth with propaganda, and courted financial ruin. Johnson's superbly researched book is also an angry book. But who can blame him?"Walter C. Uhler, San Francisco Chronicle

"A scathing and scary indictment of America's military expansion to all corners of the globe."John Wilkens, The San Diego Union-Tribune

"[An] enormously useful study."Ronald Steel, The Nation

"Every page of The Sorrows of Empire0 burns with fierce indignation at the sacrifice of American rights, values, and economic well-being in the name of conquest and empire. Chalmers Johnson has produced a blistering critique of the Bush Administration's militaristic foreign policy and its dangerous infatuation with high-tec

Review:

"In his prescient 2000 bestseller, Blowback, East Asia scholar Johnson predicted dire consequences for a U.S. foreign policy that had run roughshod over Asia. Now he joins a chorus of Bush critics in this provocative, detailed tour of what he sees as America's entrenched culture of militarism, its 'private army' of special forces and its worldwide archipelago of military 'colonies.' According to Johnson, before a mute public and Congress, oil and arms barons have displaced the State Department, secretly creating 'a military juggernaut intent on world domination' and are exercising 'preemptive intervention' for 'oil, Israel, and... to fulfill our self-perceived destiny as a New Rome.' Johnson admits that Bill Clinton, who disguised his policies as globalization, was a 'much more effective imperialist,' but most of the book assails 'the boy emperor' Bush and his cronies with one of the most startling and engrossing accounts of exotic defense capabilities, operations and spending in print, though these assertions are not new and not always assiduously sourced. Fans of Blowback will be pleased despite Johnson's lack of remedies other than 'a revolution' in which 'the people could retake control of Congress... and cut off the supply of money to the Pentagon.'" Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"A Ciceronian indictment of our nation's transformation from lone superpower to imperial bully." Kirkus Reviews

Review:

"[A] cry from the heart of an intelligent person who fears the basic values of our republic are in danger." The New York Times

Review:

"In Chalmers Johnson the American empire has found its Jeremiah. He deserves to be heard; but the proper response to his gloomy message is not despair, but thought followed by action." The Washington Post

Synopsis:

From the author of the prophetic national bestseller Blowback, comes a startling look at militarism, American style, and its consequences abroad and at home.

Synopsis:

From the author of the prophetic national bestseller Blowback, a startling look at militarism, American style, and its consequences abroad and at home

In the years after the Soviet Union imploded, the United States was described first as the globes “lone superpower,” then as a “reluctant sheriff,” next as the “indispensable nation,” and now, in the wake of 9/11, as a “New Rome.” Here, Chalmers Johnson thoroughly explores the new militarism that is transforming America and compelling its people to pick up the burden of empire.

Reminding us of the classic warnings against militarism—from George Washingtons farewell address to Dwight Eisenhowers denunciation of the military-industrial complex—Johnson uncovers its roots deep in our past. Turning to the present, he maps Americas expanding empire of military bases and the vast web of services that supports them. He offers a vivid look at the new caste of professional warriors who have infiltrated multiple branches of government, who classify as “secret” everything they do, and for whom the manipulation of the military budget is of vital interest.

Among Johnsons provocative conclusions is that American militarism is putting an end to the age of globalization and bankrupting the United States, even as it creates the conditions for a new century of virulent blowback. The Sorrows of Empire suggests that the former American republic has already crossed its Rubicon—with the Pentagon leading the way.

Synopsis:

Includes bibliographical references (p. 313-366) and index.

About the Author

Chalmers Johnson, president of the Japan Policy Research Institute, is a frequent contributor to the Los Angeles Times and The Nation. His previous books include the national bestseller Blowback, as well as MITI and the Japanese Miracle. He lives near San Diego.

Table of Contents

Prologue : the unveiling of the American empire — Imperialisms, old and new — The roots of American militarism — Toward the new Rome — The institutions of American militarism — Surrogate soldiers and private mercenaries — The empire of bases — The spoils of war — Iraq wars — Whatever happened to globalization? — The sorrows of empire.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

Betty Shirley, January 7, 2010 (view all comments by Betty Shirley)
Mr Johnson's book is about what our nation has become. We are not really all the wonderful stuff we have been told. The hard facts are that we are an Empire with military bases in most all countries, and our true power is enacted by large corporations, not elected officials. We are not a democracy. For me he explains things which are not understandable other wise.
I think everyone should read this book. We are a new form of empire, not really like Rome, but still, an empire.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No

Product Details

ISBN:
9780805070040
Subtitle:
Militarism, Secrecy, and the End of the Republic
Author:
Johnson, Chalmers
Author:
Carroll, James
Publisher:
Metropolitan Books
Location:
New York
Subject:
United states
Subject:
International
Subject:
Civil-military relations
Subject:
Imperialism
Subject:
Intervention (International law)
Subject:
Military-industrial complex
Subject:
Militarism
Subject:
Official secrets
Subject:
Intervention.
Subject:
International Relations - General
Subject:
Political Freedom & Security - International Secur
Subject:
History & Theory - General
Subject:
General Political Science
Subject:
Government - U.S. Government
Subject:
War on Terrorism,
Subject:
Iraq War,
Subject:
United States - 21st Century
Copyright:
Edition Number:
1st ed.
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
American Empire Project
Series Volume:
03-5
Publication Date:
20050106
Binding:
Electronic book text in proprietary or open standard format
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
2 maps and 1 chart
Pages:
400
Dimensions:
900x600

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Politics » Covert Government and Conspiracy Theory
History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » Politics » International Studies
History and Social Science » Politics » United States » Foreign Policy

The Sorrows of Empire: An Empire Project Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$4.50 In Stock
Product details 400 pages Metropolitan Books - English 9780805070040 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "In his prescient 2000 bestseller, Blowback, East Asia scholar Johnson predicted dire consequences for a U.S. foreign policy that had run roughshod over Asia. Now he joins a chorus of Bush critics in this provocative, detailed tour of what he sees as America's entrenched culture of militarism, its 'private army' of special forces and its worldwide archipelago of military 'colonies.' According to Johnson, before a mute public and Congress, oil and arms barons have displaced the State Department, secretly creating 'a military juggernaut intent on world domination' and are exercising 'preemptive intervention' for 'oil, Israel, and... to fulfill our self-perceived destiny as a New Rome.' Johnson admits that Bill Clinton, who disguised his policies as globalization, was a 'much more effective imperialist,' but most of the book assails 'the boy emperor' Bush and his cronies with one of the most startling and engrossing accounts of exotic defense capabilities, operations and spending in print, though these assertions are not new and not always assiduously sourced. Fans of Blowback will be pleased despite Johnson's lack of remedies other than 'a revolution' in which 'the people could retake control of Congress... and cut off the supply of money to the Pentagon.'" Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "A Ciceronian indictment of our nation's transformation from lone superpower to imperial bully."
"Review" by , "[A] cry from the heart of an intelligent person who fears the basic values of our republic are in danger."
"Review" by , "In Chalmers Johnson the American empire has found its Jeremiah. He deserves to be heard; but the proper response to his gloomy message is not despair, but thought followed by action."
"Synopsis" by , From the author of the prophetic national bestseller Blowback, comes a startling look at militarism, American style, and its consequences abroad and at home.
"Synopsis" by ,
From the author of the prophetic national bestseller Blowback, a startling look at militarism, American style, and its consequences abroad and at home

In the years after the Soviet Union imploded, the United States was described first as the globes “lone superpower,” then as a “reluctant sheriff,” next as the “indispensable nation,” and now, in the wake of 9/11, as a “New Rome.” Here, Chalmers Johnson thoroughly explores the new militarism that is transforming America and compelling its people to pick up the burden of empire.

Reminding us of the classic warnings against militarism—from George Washingtons farewell address to Dwight Eisenhowers denunciation of the military-industrial complex—Johnson uncovers its roots deep in our past. Turning to the present, he maps Americas expanding empire of military bases and the vast web of services that supports them. He offers a vivid look at the new caste of professional warriors who have infiltrated multiple branches of government, who classify as “secret” everything they do, and for whom the manipulation of the military budget is of vital interest.

Among Johnsons provocative conclusions is that American militarism is putting an end to the age of globalization and bankrupting the United States, even as it creates the conditions for a new century of virulent blowback. The Sorrows of Empire suggests that the former American republic has already crossed its Rubicon—with the Pentagon leading the way.

"Synopsis" by , Includes bibliographical references (p. 313-366) and index.
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