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A Woman in Berlin: Eight Weeks in the Conquered City

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A Woman in Berlin: Eight Weeks in the Conquered City Cover

ISBN13: 9780805075403
ISBN10: 0805075402
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

An astonishing find-the landmark journal of a woman living though the Russian occupation of Berlin-which has already earned comparisons to diaries by Etty Hillesum and Victor Klemperer

For six weeks in 1945, as Berlin fell to the Russian army, a young woman, alone in the city, kept a daily record of her and her neighbors' experiences, determined to describe the common lot of millions.

Purged of all self-pity but with laser-sharp observation and bracing humor, the anonymous author conjures up a ravaged apartment building and its little group of residents struggling to get by in the rubble without food, heat, or water. Clear-eyed and unsentimental, she depicts her fellow Berliners in all their humanity as well as their cravenness, corrupted first by hunger and then by the Russians. And with shocking and vivid detail, she tells of the shameful indignities to which women in a conquered city are always subject: the mass rape suffered by all, regardless of age or infirmity. Through this ordeal, she maintains her resilience, decency, and fierce will to come through her city's trial, until normalcy and safety return.

At once an essential record and a work of great literature, A Woman in Berlin not only reveals a true heroine, sure to join other enduring figures of the twentieth century, but also gives voice to the rarely heard victims of war: the women.

Review:

"Anonymous, then a 34-year-old journalist, started this eight-week diary in April 1945, when the Russians were invading Berlin and the city's mostly female population was heading to its cellars to wait out the bombing. Anyone who was able looted abandoned buildings for food of any kind. Soon the Russians were everywhere; liquored-up Russian soldiers raped women indiscriminately. After being raped herself, Anonymous decided to 'find a single wolf to keep away the pack.' Thanks to a small series of Russian officers, she was better fed and better protected at night. Her story illustrates the horror war brings to the lives of women when the battles are waged near a home front (rather than a traditional battlefield). In retrospect, she advises women victimized by mass rape to talk to each other about it. Once the war was officially over, the real starvation began; by the time the author's soldier boyfriend returned to Berlin, she was too hungry and hurt to deal with him. When the radio reported concentration camp horrors, she was pained but unable to quite take it in. The author, who died in 2001, has a fierce, uncompromising voice, and her book should become a classic of war literature. First published in 1954, it was probably too dark for postwar readers, German or Allied. Now, after witnessing Bosnia and Darfur, maybe we are finally ready. New translation includes previously untranslated portions." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Synopsis:

A New York Times Book Review Editors' Choice

 

For eight weeks in 1945, as Berlin fell to the Russian army, a young woman kept a daily record of life in her apartment building and among its residents. "With bald honesty and brutal lyricism" (Elle), the anonymous author depicts her fellow Berliners in all their humanity, as well as their cravenness, corrupted first by hunger and then by the Russians. "Spare and unpredictable, minutely observed and utterly free of self-pity" (The Plain Dealer, Cleveland), A Woman in Berlin tells of the complex relationship between civilians and an occupying army and the shameful indignities to which women in a conquered city are always subject--the mass rape suffered by all, regardless of age or infirmity.

A Woman in Berlin stands as "one of the essential books for understanding war and life" (A. S. Byatt, author of Possession).

Synopsis:

With shocking and vivid detail, the journal of a woman living through the Russian occupation of Berlin in 1945 tells of the shameful indignities to which women in a conquered city are always subject and describes the common experience of millions.

About the Author

Anonymous was a young woman at the time of the fall of Berlin. She was a journalist and editor during and after the war.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

Chris Radcliffe, August 27, 2009 (view all comments by Chris Radcliffe)
I know that the subject matter is going to put a lot of people off but...................

This is one of the most incredible pieces of writing I've ever come across. This book illuminates the bogeyman that awaits the fall of every civilization. I survived Katerina and have seen such things played out in our own country. The author manages to be wry, insightful and heartrendingly plainspoken at the same time. I'm going to be thinking about this for a long time. You can't ask more from a book.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No

Product Details

ISBN:
9780805075403
Subtitle:
Eight Weeks in the Conquered City: A Diary
Translator:
Boehm, Philip
Translator:
Boehm, Philip
Author:
Anonymous
Author:
Boehm, Philip
Translator:
Phillip, Boehm
Publisher:
Metropolitan Books
Subject:
Women
Subject:
Military - World War II
Subject:
World war, 1939-1945
Subject:
Modern - 20th Century
Subject:
Personal Memoirs
Subject:
General Biography
Subject:
World War, 1939-1945 -- Germany -- Berlin.
Subject:
Biography-Women
Subject:
Europe - Germany
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Cloth
Publication Date:
20050804
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
288
Dimensions:
8.46 x 5.7 x 1.07 in

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Related Subjects


Biography » General
Biography » Women
History and Social Science » Europe » Germany » Modern Germany
History and Social Science » Military » World War II » General
History and Social Science » World History » Germany » General

A Woman in Berlin: Eight Weeks in the Conquered City Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$12.50 In Stock
Product details 288 pages Metropolitan Books - English 9780805075403 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Anonymous, then a 34-year-old journalist, started this eight-week diary in April 1945, when the Russians were invading Berlin and the city's mostly female population was heading to its cellars to wait out the bombing. Anyone who was able looted abandoned buildings for food of any kind. Soon the Russians were everywhere; liquored-up Russian soldiers raped women indiscriminately. After being raped herself, Anonymous decided to 'find a single wolf to keep away the pack.' Thanks to a small series of Russian officers, she was better fed and better protected at night. Her story illustrates the horror war brings to the lives of women when the battles are waged near a home front (rather than a traditional battlefield). In retrospect, she advises women victimized by mass rape to talk to each other about it. Once the war was officially over, the real starvation began; by the time the author's soldier boyfriend returned to Berlin, she was too hungry and hurt to deal with him. When the radio reported concentration camp horrors, she was pained but unable to quite take it in. The author, who died in 2001, has a fierce, uncompromising voice, and her book should become a classic of war literature. First published in 1954, it was probably too dark for postwar readers, German or Allied. Now, after witnessing Bosnia and Darfur, maybe we are finally ready. New translation includes previously untranslated portions." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by ,

A New York Times Book Review Editors' Choice

 

For eight weeks in 1945, as Berlin fell to the Russian army, a young woman kept a daily record of life in her apartment building and among its residents. "With bald honesty and brutal lyricism" (Elle), the anonymous author depicts her fellow Berliners in all their humanity, as well as their cravenness, corrupted first by hunger and then by the Russians. "Spare and unpredictable, minutely observed and utterly free of self-pity" (The Plain Dealer, Cleveland), A Woman in Berlin tells of the complex relationship between civilians and an occupying army and the shameful indignities to which women in a conquered city are always subject--the mass rape suffered by all, regardless of age or infirmity.

A Woman in Berlin stands as "one of the essential books for understanding war and life" (A. S. Byatt, author of Possession).

"Synopsis" by , With shocking and vivid detail, the journal of a woman living through the Russian occupation of Berlin in 1945 tells of the shameful indignities to which women in a conquered city are always subject and describes the common experience of millions.
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