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4 Local Warehouse Exploration- New World

A Voyage Long and Strange: Rediscovering the New World

by

A Voyage Long and Strange: Rediscovering the New World Cover

 

Staff Pick

With the same sly humor and neighborly curiosity he brought to Confederates in the Attic and Blue Latitudes, in A Voyage Long and Strange Tony Horwitz roams the New World, surveying the destinations of history's foremost explorers: Leif Eiriksson (Newfoundland), Columbus (the Dominican Republic), Coronado (the Great Plains of America), and De Soto (Florida), to name just a few. What do North Americans think of those explorers now, anyway? Ride along with Horwitz — but let him suffer the sweat lodge alone — and discover for yourself.
Recommended by Dave, Powells.com

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The bestselling author of Blue Latitudes takes us on a thrilling and eye-opening voyage to pre-Mayflower America.

On a chance visit to Plymouth Rock, Tony Horwitz realizes he's mislaid more than a century of American history, from Columbus's sail in 1492 to Jamestown's founding in 16-oh-something. Did nothing happen in between? Determined to find out, he embarks on a journey of rediscovery, following in the footsteps of the many Europeans who preceded the Pilgrims to America.

An irresistible blend of history, myth, and misadventure, A Voyage Long and Strange captures the wonder and drama of first contact. Vikings, conquistadors, French voyageurs — these and many others roamed an unknown continent in quest of grapes, gold, converts, even a cure for syphilis. Though most failed, their remarkable exploits left an enduring mark on the land and people encountered by late-arriving English settlers.

Tracing this legacy with his own epic trek — from Florida's Fountain of Youth to Plymouth's sacred Rock, from desert pueblos to subarctic sweat lodges — Tony Horwitz explores the revealing gap between what we enshrine and what we forget. Displaying his trademark talent for humor, narrative, and historical insight, A Voyage Long and Strange allows us to rediscover the New World for ourselves.

Review:

"Signature Reviewed by Robert Sullivan As opposed to the Pilgrims, Tony Horwitz begins his journey at Plymouth Rock.Plymouth Rock is a myth. The Pilgrims — who, Horwitz notes, were on a mission that was based less on freedom and the schoolbook history ideas the president of the United States typically mentions when he pardons a turkey at the White House and more on finding a cure for syphilis — may or may not have noticed it. In about 1741, a church elder in Plymouth, winging it, pointed out a boulder that is now more like a not-at-all-precious stone. Three hundred years later, people push and shove to see it in summer tourist season, wearing T-shirts that say, 'America's Hometown.' Which eventually leads an overstimulated (historically speaking) Horwitz to come close to starting a fight in a Plymouth bar. 'Not to Virginians it isn't,' he writes. 'Or Hispanics or Indians.''Forget all the others,' his bar mate says loudly. 'This is the friggin' beginning of America!'A Voyage Long and Strange is a history-fueled, self-imposed mission of rediscovery, a travelogue that sets out to explore the surprisingly long list of explorers who discovered America, and what discovered means anyway, starting with the Vikings in A.D. 1000, and ending up on the Mayflower. Horwitz (Blue Latitudes; Confederates in the Attic) even dons conquistador gear, making the narrative surprisingly fun and funny, even as he spends a lot of time describing just how badly Columbus and subsequently the Spanish treated people. (Highpoint: a trip to a Columbus battle site in the Dominican Republic, when Horwitz gets stuck with a nearly inoperable rental car in a Sargasso Sea of traffic.) In the course of tracing the routes of de Soto in, for instance, Tennessee, and the amazing Cabeza de Vaca (Daniel Day Lewis's next role?) in Tucson, Ariz., Horwitz drives off any given road to meet the back-to-the-land husband-and-wife team researching Coronado's expeditions through Mexico; or the Fed Ex guy who may be a link to the lost colonists of the Elizabethan Roanoke expedition.Horwitz can occasionally be smug about what constitutes custom — who's to say that a Canadian tribe's regular karaoke night isn't a community-building exercise as valid as the communal sweat that nearly kills Horwitz early on in his thousands of miles of adventures? But as a character himself, he is friendly and always working hard to listen and bear witness. 'I hate the whole Thanksgiving story,' says a newspaper editor of Spanish descent, a man he meets along the trail of Coronado. 'We should be eating chili, not turkey. But no one wants to recognize the Spanish because it would mean admitting that they got here decades before the English.' Robert Sullivan is the author of Cross Country, How Not to Get Rich and Rats (Bloomsbury)." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"Travel journalism is a lot like traveling salesmanship — lots of windshield time, bad food and people who really don't want to talk to you. Tony Horwitz gamely forges on, without a limo or tour guide waiting at the airport. He rents his own cars and drives himself to the nearest saloon or hardware store in search of a loquacious local, who then becomes the reader's tour guide as well. For Horwitz,... Washington Post Book Review (read the entire Washington Post review)

Review:

"[I]nformative, whimsical, and thoroughly enjoyable....As always, Horwitz writes in a breezy, engaging style, so this combination of popular history and travelogue will be ideal for general readers." Booklist (Starred Review)

Review:

"This readable and vastly entertaining history travelog is highly recommended." Library Journal (Starred Review)

Review:

"[A] funny and lively new travelogue...popular history of the most accessible sort. The pace never flags, even for easily distracted readers, because Horwitz knows how to quick-cut between historical narrative and a breezy account of his own travels." Andrew Ferguson, The New York Times Book Review

Review:

"Irreverent, effervescent....Accessible to all ages, hands-on and immensely readable, this book invites readers to search out America's story for themselves." Kirkus Reviews

Review:

"A Voyage Long and Strange — disturbing, honest, wonderfully written, and heroically researched — should be required reading in every high school in the land." The Boston Globe

Review:

"As Horwitz travels from sea to shining sea in search of historical truth, his prose varies from uplifting to sluggish. Only a true history buff will devote the effort needed to see it through." Rocky Mountain News

Review:

"Horwitz's charm, smarts, impeccable research and curiosity make this a voyage worth taking. Gentle and funny, he manages to tell us just how astoundingly ignorant we are without chiding us at all." Cleveland Plain Dealer

Review:

"[Horwitz] brings history to life with brio, he ponders its meanings with sensitivity, and he laments its general neglect with concern. By conveying our past so heartily, handsomely and winsomely, Tony Horwitz does America proud." Providence Journal

Review:

"By turns history and travelogue...instructive and charming. Horwitz sure can spin a yarn. He re-creates the wonder — and the horror — of the explorers' encounters with exotic creatures. And his thumbnail sketches of the first-comers are tight and bright." Baltimore Sun

Book News Annotation:

Between Columbus in 1492 and the Mayflower in 1620, Horwitz discovered, most Americans carry a gap in their knowledge. A Massachusetts-based journalist and popular historian, he backfills with a history of mainly Spanish exploration, conquest, and settlement. He draws on contemporary accounts, but places them in an account of his own travels to such places as Vinland, the Caribbean, the southwest, the Mississippi River, and Jamestown. Annotation ©2008 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

The bestselling author of Blue Latitudes takes readers on a thrilling and eye-opening voyage to pre-Mayflower America. An irresistible blend of history, myth, and misadventure, A Voyage Long and Strange captures the wonder and drama of first contact.

Synopsis:

W hat happened in North America between Columbus's sail in 1492 and the Pilgrims' arrival in 1620?

On a visit to Plymouth Rock, Tony Horwitz realizes he doesn't have a clue, nor do most Americans. So he sets off across the continent to rediscover the wild era when Europeans first roamed the New World in quest of gold, glory, converts, and eternal youth. Horwitz tells the story of these brave and often crazed explorers while retracing their steps on his own epic trek--an odyssey that takes him inside an Indian sweat lodge in subarctic Canada, down the Mississippi in a canoe, on a road trip fueled by buffalo meat, and into sixty pounds of armor as a conquistador reenactor in Florida.

A Voyage Long and Strange is a rich mix of scholarship and modern-day adventure that brings the forgotten first chapter of America's history vividly to life.

Synopsis:

The acclaimed author ofAre We Rome?brings his highly praised blend of deep research, colorful travelogue, and insightful political analysis to a new history of the Inquisition.

We think of the Inquisition as a holy war fought in the Middle Ages. But, as Cullen Murphy shows in this provocative new book, not only did its offices survive into the twentieth century, in the modern world its spirit is more influential than ever. Traveling from freshly opened Vatican archives to the detention camps of Guantánamo to the filing cabinets of the Third Reich, he traces the Inquisition and its legacy.

God’s Juryencompasses the diverse stories of the Knights Templar, Torquemada, Galileo, and Graham Greene. Established by the Catholic Church in 1231, the Inquisition continued in one form or another for almost seven hundred years. Though associated with the persecution of heretics and Jews—and with burning at the stake—its targets were more numerous and its techniques more ambitious. The Inquisition pioneered surveillance and censorship and “scientific” interrogation. As time went on, its methods and mindset spread far beyond the Church to become tools of secular persecution.

With vivid immediacy and authority, Murphy puts a human face on a familiar but little-known piece of our past, and argues that only by understanding the Inquisition can we hope to explain the making of the present.

Video

About the Author

Tony Horwitz is the bestselling author of Blue Latitudes, Confederates in the Attic, and Baghdad Without a Map. He is also a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist who has worked for The Wall Street Journal and The New Yorker. He lives in Martha's Vineyard with his wife, Geraldine Brooks, and their son, Nathaniel.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

shilo2800, June 12, 2008 (view all comments by shilo2800)
Tony Horeitz is informative and entertaining and very readable. I 'v enjoyed his other boooks. Blue Latitudes and Confederates in the Attic. they will keep you laughing(out loud). This one is a bit darker and I dont think he likes some of his subjects as well ( I know I don't.) Spainish Conquistadors, in particular . The English, Dutch and French weren't much better, and the terrrible consequences to the native peoples. But I learned alot of new information and smiled a bit sadly to where and what this history has brought us. It's a history worth knowing and one you won't get as clearly and readable from anyone else . Thanks Tony.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(8 of 12 readers found this comment helpful)

Product Details

ISBN:
9780805076035
Author:
Horwitz, Tony
Publisher:
Henry Holt & Company
Author:
Murphy, Cullen
Subject:
General Travel
Subject:
General
Subject:
Americas (North Central South West Indies)
Subject:
History
Subject:
Explorers
Subject:
North American
Subject:
Essays & Travelogues
Subject:
Expeditions & Discoveries
Subject:
America Discovery and exploration.
Subject:
North America Discovery and exploration.
Subject:
Europe - General
Subject:
World History-General
Subject:
United States - General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Cloth
Publication Date:
20080431
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
6-8 maps; 3 illustrations throughout; pr
Pages:
464
Dimensions:
9.25 x 6.13 in

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Related Subjects

Featured Titles » Foreign Language and Travel
History and Social Science » Exploration » New World
History and Social Science » Native American » General Native American Studies
History and Social Science » US History » General
History and Social Science » World History » General
Travel » Travel Writing » Exploration
Travel » Travel Writing » General

A Voyage Long and Strange: Rediscovering the New World Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$12.50 In Stock
Product details 464 pages Henry Holt and Co. - English 9780805076035 Reviews:
"Staff Pick" by ,

With the same sly humor and neighborly curiosity he brought to Confederates in the Attic and Blue Latitudes, in A Voyage Long and Strange Tony Horwitz roams the New World, surveying the destinations of history's foremost explorers: Leif Eiriksson (Newfoundland), Columbus (the Dominican Republic), Coronado (the Great Plains of America), and De Soto (Florida), to name just a few. What do North Americans think of those explorers now, anyway? Ride along with Horwitz — but let him suffer the sweat lodge alone — and discover for yourself.

"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Signature Reviewed by Robert Sullivan As opposed to the Pilgrims, Tony Horwitz begins his journey at Plymouth Rock.Plymouth Rock is a myth. The Pilgrims — who, Horwitz notes, were on a mission that was based less on freedom and the schoolbook history ideas the president of the United States typically mentions when he pardons a turkey at the White House and more on finding a cure for syphilis — may or may not have noticed it. In about 1741, a church elder in Plymouth, winging it, pointed out a boulder that is now more like a not-at-all-precious stone. Three hundred years later, people push and shove to see it in summer tourist season, wearing T-shirts that say, 'America's Hometown.' Which eventually leads an overstimulated (historically speaking) Horwitz to come close to starting a fight in a Plymouth bar. 'Not to Virginians it isn't,' he writes. 'Or Hispanics or Indians.''Forget all the others,' his bar mate says loudly. 'This is the friggin' beginning of America!'A Voyage Long and Strange is a history-fueled, self-imposed mission of rediscovery, a travelogue that sets out to explore the surprisingly long list of explorers who discovered America, and what discovered means anyway, starting with the Vikings in A.D. 1000, and ending up on the Mayflower. Horwitz (Blue Latitudes; Confederates in the Attic) even dons conquistador gear, making the narrative surprisingly fun and funny, even as he spends a lot of time describing just how badly Columbus and subsequently the Spanish treated people. (Highpoint: a trip to a Columbus battle site in the Dominican Republic, when Horwitz gets stuck with a nearly inoperable rental car in a Sargasso Sea of traffic.) In the course of tracing the routes of de Soto in, for instance, Tennessee, and the amazing Cabeza de Vaca (Daniel Day Lewis's next role?) in Tucson, Ariz., Horwitz drives off any given road to meet the back-to-the-land husband-and-wife team researching Coronado's expeditions through Mexico; or the Fed Ex guy who may be a link to the lost colonists of the Elizabethan Roanoke expedition.Horwitz can occasionally be smug about what constitutes custom — who's to say that a Canadian tribe's regular karaoke night isn't a community-building exercise as valid as the communal sweat that nearly kills Horwitz early on in his thousands of miles of adventures? But as a character himself, he is friendly and always working hard to listen and bear witness. 'I hate the whole Thanksgiving story,' says a newspaper editor of Spanish descent, a man he meets along the trail of Coronado. 'We should be eating chili, not turkey. But no one wants to recognize the Spanish because it would mean admitting that they got here decades before the English.' Robert Sullivan is the author of Cross Country, How Not to Get Rich and Rats (Bloomsbury)." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "[I]nformative, whimsical, and thoroughly enjoyable....As always, Horwitz writes in a breezy, engaging style, so this combination of popular history and travelogue will be ideal for general readers."
"Review" by , "This readable and vastly entertaining history travelog is highly recommended."
"Review" by , "[A] funny and lively new travelogue...popular history of the most accessible sort. The pace never flags, even for easily distracted readers, because Horwitz knows how to quick-cut between historical narrative and a breezy account of his own travels."
"Review" by , "Irreverent, effervescent....Accessible to all ages, hands-on and immensely readable, this book invites readers to search out America's story for themselves."
"Review" by , "A Voyage Long and Strange — disturbing, honest, wonderfully written, and heroically researched — should be required reading in every high school in the land."
"Review" by , "As Horwitz travels from sea to shining sea in search of historical truth, his prose varies from uplifting to sluggish. Only a true history buff will devote the effort needed to see it through."
"Review" by , "Horwitz's charm, smarts, impeccable research and curiosity make this a voyage worth taking. Gentle and funny, he manages to tell us just how astoundingly ignorant we are without chiding us at all."
"Review" by , "[Horwitz] brings history to life with brio, he ponders its meanings with sensitivity, and he laments its general neglect with concern. By conveying our past so heartily, handsomely and winsomely, Tony Horwitz does America proud."
"Review" by , "By turns history and travelogue...instructive and charming. Horwitz sure can spin a yarn. He re-creates the wonder — and the horror — of the explorers' encounters with exotic creatures. And his thumbnail sketches of the first-comers are tight and bright."
"Synopsis" by , The bestselling author of Blue Latitudes takes readers on a thrilling and eye-opening voyage to pre-Mayflower America. An irresistible blend of history, myth, and misadventure, A Voyage Long and Strange captures the wonder and drama of first contact.
"Synopsis" by ,

W hat happened in North America between Columbus's sail in 1492 and the Pilgrims' arrival in 1620?

On a visit to Plymouth Rock, Tony Horwitz realizes he doesn't have a clue, nor do most Americans. So he sets off across the continent to rediscover the wild era when Europeans first roamed the New World in quest of gold, glory, converts, and eternal youth. Horwitz tells the story of these brave and often crazed explorers while retracing their steps on his own epic trek--an odyssey that takes him inside an Indian sweat lodge in subarctic Canada, down the Mississippi in a canoe, on a road trip fueled by buffalo meat, and into sixty pounds of armor as a conquistador reenactor in Florida.

A Voyage Long and Strange is a rich mix of scholarship and modern-day adventure that brings the forgotten first chapter of America's history vividly to life.

"Synopsis" by ,

The acclaimed author ofAre We Rome?brings his highly praised blend of deep research, colorful travelogue, and insightful political analysis to a new history of the Inquisition.

We think of the Inquisition as a holy war fought in the Middle Ages. But, as Cullen Murphy shows in this provocative new book, not only did its offices survive into the twentieth century, in the modern world its spirit is more influential than ever. Traveling from freshly opened Vatican archives to the detention camps of Guantánamo to the filing cabinets of the Third Reich, he traces the Inquisition and its legacy.

God’s Juryencompasses the diverse stories of the Knights Templar, Torquemada, Galileo, and Graham Greene. Established by the Catholic Church in 1231, the Inquisition continued in one form or another for almost seven hundred years. Though associated with the persecution of heretics and Jews—and with burning at the stake—its targets were more numerous and its techniques more ambitious. The Inquisition pioneered surveillance and censorship and “scientific” interrogation. As time went on, its methods and mindset spread far beyond the Church to become tools of secular persecution.

With vivid immediacy and authority, Murphy puts a human face on a familiar but little-known piece of our past, and argues that only by understanding the Inquisition can we hope to explain the making of the present.

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