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1 Burnside Russia- Soviet States Post 1985

Putin's Russia: Life in a Failing Democracy

by

Putin's Russia: Life in a Failing Democracy Cover

ISBN13: 9780805079302
ISBN10: 0805079300
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

A searing portrait of a country in disarray and of the man at its helm, from the bravest of Russian

journalists (The New York Times)

Hailed as a lone voice crying out in a moral wilderness (New Statesman), Anna Politkovskaya made her name with her fearless reporting on the war in Chechnya. Now she turns her steely gaze on the multiple threats to Russian stability, among them Vladimir Putin himself.

Rich with characters and poignant accounts, Putin's Russia depicts a far-reaching state of decay. Politkovskaya describes an army in which soldiers die from malnutrition, parents must pay bribes to recover their dead sons' bodies, and conscripts are even hired out as slaves. She exposes rampant corruption in business, government, and the judiciary, where everything from store permits to bus routes to court appointments is for sale. And she offers a scathing condemnation of the ongoing war in Chechnya, where kidnappings, extra-judicial killings, rape, and torture are begetting terrorism rather than fighting it. Finally, Politkovskaya denounces both Putin, for stifling civil liberties as he pushes the country back to a Soviet-style dictatorship, and the West, for its unqualified embrace of the Russian leader.

Sounding an urgent alarm, Putin's Russia is a gripping portrayal of a country in crisis and the testament of a great and intrepid reporter.

A special correspondent for Novaya gazeta, Anna Politkovskaya has been honored by Amnesty International and Index on Censorship. In 2000 she received Russia's prestigious Golden Pen Award for her coverage of the war in Chechnya. She lives in Moscow. Hailed as a lone voice crying out in a moral wilderness (New Statesman), Anna Politkovskaya made her name with her fearless reporting on the war in Chechnya. Now she turns her steely gaze on the multiple threats to Russian stability, among them Vladimir Putin himself.

Putin's Russia depicts a far-reaching state of decay. Politkovskaya describes an army in which soldiers die from malnutrition, parents must pay bribes to recover their dead sons' bodies, and conscripts are even hired out as slaves. She exposes rampant corruption in business, government, and the judiciary, where everything from store permits to bus routes to court appointments is for sale. And she offers a scathing condemnation of the ongoing war in Chechnya, where kidnappings, extra-judicial killings, rape, and torture are begetting terrorism rather than fighting it. Finally, Politkovskaya denounces both Putin, for stifling civil liberties as he pushes the country back to a Soviet-style dictatorship, and the West, for its unqualified embrace of the Russian leader.

Sounding an urgent alarm, Putin's Russia is a portrayal of a country in crisis and the testament of a great and intrepid reporter. Politkovskaya, a journalist who writes for the newspaper Novaya Gazeta, is a master at depicting horror and suffering. Her book focuses on the Chechen war and ways in which state violence--often against Russia's own people--is defended as a weapon in the war on terrorism . . . The more Westerners know about Putin's Russia, the better.--Tara McKelvey, The New York Times Book Review Politkovskaya, a journalist who writes for the newspaper Novaya Gazeta, is a master at depicting horror and suffering. Her book focuses on the Chechen war and ways in which state violence--often against Russia's own people--is defended as a weapon in the war on terrorism. The book derives much of its power from a series of vignettes about families grieving over lost children, including Pavel Levurda, a soldier left behind to die on the battlefield; Misha Nikolayev, a border guard with festering sores, who 'rotted alive under the eyes of his officers'; and 15-year-old Yaroslav Fadeyev, shot, apparently by Russian forces during the 2002 Chechen siege of a Moscow theater. The last story is told by Fadeyev's young mother, Irina, who after identifying his body threw herself into the icy Moscow River and--to her dismay--was pulled from the water. A unifying theme is the leadership of President Vladimir Putin, a former K.G.B. spy. We see, under his watch, a prevalence of sadistic military commanders; 'political psychiatry, with diagnoses to order'; and telephone law, a holdover from Soviet days when a judge reached a verdict after receiving a phone call from a government official. The acts of violence (soldiers accidentally buried alive, suspects injected with psychotropic drugs) make the book a tough read. But, as Politkovskaya says, it may have been pressure from the German Parliament that helped an impoverished Chechen couple get justice for their daughter, 18-year-old Elza Kungayeva, who was kidnapped and strangled by a Russian officer in 2000. The more Westerners know about Putin's Russia, the better.--Tara McKelvey, The New York Times Book Review That Politkovskaya herself has withstood poisoning and harassment to tell the truth about Putin's Russia should give even the most pessimistic observer of current Russian affairs some hope.--Michael McFaul, The Washington Post Book World The reporting is brave, the style raw. The tale recalls the darkness of the Soviet past, but it should sound alarm bells for today. What this book has to say about hypocrisy, racism, and the war on terror should resonate for us all.--Catherine Merridale, The Observer

Politkovskaya's most searing critique of the Russian government to date.--The Guardian

In Putin's Russia, the country's most famous investigative journalist and most outspoken member of an increasingly enfeebled media establishment deploys her legendary blunt prose to great effect.--Andrew Osborn, The Independent

Politkovskaya, an award-winning journalist for the Moscow newspaper Novaya gazeta, makes no excuses for her dislike of Russian president Vladimir Putin and his leadership style, reminiscent of the late Soviet period. Over the past five ye

Review:

"At a time when many Westerners are ambivalent about Russian President Vladimir Putin, famed war correspondent Politkovskaya (A Small Corner of Hell: Dispatches from Chechnya) argues that there is little to admire about the man or the country he has remade in his image. By recounting stories of the winners and losers in today's Russia, Politkovskaya portrays the country as a place where decency is punished, corruption rules and murder is simply a means of getting to and staying at the top. 'Putin may be God and Czar in Chechnya, punishing and pardoning, but he is afraid of touching... Mafiosi,' Politkovskaya writes. She's an attentive and compassionate storyteller, and the stories she tells are worth reading. The same cannot be said of her simplistic analysis. Politkovskaya's claims that Russia is more corrupt than ever before and that it's reverting to Stalinism, for example, may strike readers as provocative exaggerations. As someone frustrated with the Putin regime and furious about the war in Chechnya, which she argues is an omen of the state's future inhumane treatment of all its citizens, Politkovskaya is passionate and sometimes convincing. But she never adequately explains why, if life under Putin is so awful, 70% of Russian voters chose him for their president in 2004." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"Since coming to power in 2000, Russian President Vladimir Putin has had one clear central objective: strengthening the Russian state, at home and abroad. For Putin, Russia's second post-Soviet leader and a former KGB official, the disappearance of the Soviet Union in 1991 was a tragedy that produced anarchy, corruption, instability and uncertainty. He pledged to end the chaos by restoring the state... Washington Post Book Review (read the entire Washington Post review)

Synopsis:

This devastating appraisal is a searing portrait of a country in disarray and of the man at its helm, from "the bravest of Russian journalists" ("The New York Times").

Synopsis:

This is a devastating appraisal of the policies of Russia's current head of state by the country's leading radical journalist. Known for her humanity and passion, she is admired for her fearless reporting on human-rights issues, especially the wars in Chechnya.

Synopsis:

A searing portrait of a country in disarray and of the man at its helm, from “the bravest of Russian

journalists” (The New York Times)

Hailed as “a lone voice crying out in a moral wilderness” (New Statesman), Anna Politkovskaya made her name with her fearless reporting on the war in Chechnya. Now she turns her steely gaze on the multiple threats to Russian stability, among them Vladimir Putin himself.

Rich with characters and poignant accounts, Putins Russia depicts a far-reaching state of decay. Politkovskaya describes an army in which soldiers die from malnutrition, parents must pay bribes to recover their dead sons bodies, and conscripts are even hired out as slaves. She exposes rampant corruption in business, government, and the judiciary, where everything from store permits to bus routes to court appointments is for sale. And she offers a scathing condemnation of the ongoing war in Chechnya, where kidnappings, extra-judicial killings, rape, and torture are begetting terrorism rather than fighting it. Finally, Politkovskaya denounces both Putin, for stifling civil liberties as he pushes the country back to a Soviet-style dictatorship, and the West, for its unqualified embrace of the Russian leader.

Sounding an urgent alarm, Putins Russia is a gripping portrayal of a country in crisis and the testament of a great and intrepid reporter.

About the Author

A special correspondent for Novaya gazeta, Anna Politkovskaya has been honored by Amnesty International and Index on Censorship. In 2000 she received Russias prestigious Golden Pen Award for her coverage of the war in Chechnya. She lives in Moscow.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

j.irwin, December 5, 2007 (view all comments by j.irwin)
Anna Politkovskaya's account of life in Russia is eye-opening and gives reason for concern. While it must have taken a great deal of courage to write such a detailed critique of Putin and his government, the book is too biased. Even if the accounts are all true, which I don't doubt they are, the lack of a significant opposing view hurts the book's readibility and gives the sense of a 300 page editorial. Politkovskaya's style and reporting are, however, top notch.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780805079302
Subtitle:
Life in a Failing Democracy
Author:
Politkovskaia, Anna
Author:
Politkovskaya, Anna
Publisher:
Metropolitan Books
Subject:
Social conditions
Subject:
Moral conditions
Subject:
Post-communism
Subject:
Modern - 21st Century
Subject:
Europe - Russia & the Former Soviet Union
Subject:
Political Freedom & Security - General
Subject:
Government - International
Subject:
POL035000
Subject:
Russia (federation)
Subject:
Putin, Vladimir Vladimirovich
Subject:
Europe/Russia
Subject:
the Former Soviet Union
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20051227
Binding:
Electronic book text in proprietary or open standard format
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
288
Dimensions:
8.27 x 5.5 x 0.795 in

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Russia » Soviet States Post 1985

Putin's Russia: Life in a Failing Democracy Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$15.95 In Stock
Product details 288 pages Metropolitan Books - English 9780805079302 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "At a time when many Westerners are ambivalent about Russian President Vladimir Putin, famed war correspondent Politkovskaya (A Small Corner of Hell: Dispatches from Chechnya) argues that there is little to admire about the man or the country he has remade in his image. By recounting stories of the winners and losers in today's Russia, Politkovskaya portrays the country as a place where decency is punished, corruption rules and murder is simply a means of getting to and staying at the top. 'Putin may be God and Czar in Chechnya, punishing and pardoning, but he is afraid of touching... Mafiosi,' Politkovskaya writes. She's an attentive and compassionate storyteller, and the stories she tells are worth reading. The same cannot be said of her simplistic analysis. Politkovskaya's claims that Russia is more corrupt than ever before and that it's reverting to Stalinism, for example, may strike readers as provocative exaggerations. As someone frustrated with the Putin regime and furious about the war in Chechnya, which she argues is an omen of the state's future inhumane treatment of all its citizens, Politkovskaya is passionate and sometimes convincing. But she never adequately explains why, if life under Putin is so awful, 70% of Russian voters chose him for their president in 2004." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by , This devastating appraisal is a searing portrait of a country in disarray and of the man at its helm, from "the bravest of Russian journalists" ("The New York Times").
"Synopsis" by , This is a devastating appraisal of the policies of Russia's current head of state by the country's leading radical journalist. Known for her humanity and passion, she is admired for her fearless reporting on human-rights issues, especially the wars in Chechnya.
"Synopsis" by ,
A searing portrait of a country in disarray and of the man at its helm, from “the bravest of Russian

journalists” (The New York Times)

Hailed as “a lone voice crying out in a moral wilderness” (New Statesman), Anna Politkovskaya made her name with her fearless reporting on the war in Chechnya. Now she turns her steely gaze on the multiple threats to Russian stability, among them Vladimir Putin himself.

Rich with characters and poignant accounts, Putins Russia depicts a far-reaching state of decay. Politkovskaya describes an army in which soldiers die from malnutrition, parents must pay bribes to recover their dead sons bodies, and conscripts are even hired out as slaves. She exposes rampant corruption in business, government, and the judiciary, where everything from store permits to bus routes to court appointments is for sale. And she offers a scathing condemnation of the ongoing war in Chechnya, where kidnappings, extra-judicial killings, rape, and torture are begetting terrorism rather than fighting it. Finally, Politkovskaya denounces both Putin, for stifling civil liberties as he pushes the country back to a Soviet-style dictatorship, and the West, for its unqualified embrace of the Russian leader.

Sounding an urgent alarm, Putins Russia is a gripping portrayal of a country in crisis and the testament of a great and intrepid reporter.

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