Master your Minecraft
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN a $100 Credit

Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news
for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

Tour our stores


    Recently Viewed clear list


    Contributors | November 26, 2014

    Chris Faatz: IMG The Collected Poems of James Laughlin



    Fall has brought us a true gift in the publication of the massive The Collected Poems of James Laughlin, published by New Directions in an... Continue »

    spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$11.95
List price: $16.99
Used Hardcover
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Burnside Children's Young Adult- General

More copies of this ISBN

Harmonic Feedback

by

Harmonic Feedback Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Sixteen-year-old, music- and sound design-obsessed Drea doesnt have friends. She has, as shes often reminded, issues. Dreas mom and a rotating band of psychiatrists have settled on “a touch of Aspergers.”

Having just moved to the latest in a string of new towns, Drea meets two other outsiders. And Naomi and Justin seem to actually like Drea. The three of them form a band after an impromptu, Portishead-comparison-worthy jam after school. Justin swiftly challenges not only Dreas preference for Poe over Black Lab but also her perceived inability to connect with another person. Justin, against all odds, may even like like Drea.

Its obvious that Drea cant hide behind her sound equipment anymore. But just when shes found not one but two true friends, can she stand to lose one of them?

Harmonic Feedback is a 2011 Bank Street - Best Children's Book of the Year.

Review:

"A story of how it feels to be an outsider, Kelly's debut follows the complex and candid thoughts of 16-year-old Drea, who is diagnosed with ADHD and borderline Asperger's syndrome. She is highly intelligent, but certain tasks, such as driving, and social interactions are challenging ('All I know is I make sense to me--it's other people who seem complicated,' she says). When she and her flighty mother move to yet another town to live with her ornery grandmother Drea wants to crawl into her shell. But then she meets flamboyant, attention-seeker Naomi and sensitive Justin, both of whom share the burden of unstable families and imperfect pasts. The trio bonds over a mutual love for making trip-hop music and a desire to trust someone, but Naomi's taste for danger and drugs soon distances her from her new friends. While Naomi's self-destruction follows a predictable downward spiral, the novel's strength lies in Drea's dynamic personality: a combination of surprising immaturity, childish wonder, and profound insight. Her search for stability and need to escape being labeled is poignant and convincing. Ages 14 — up. (May) This is DC's fourth try in the past 10 years to reintroduce Superman to a general audience. The story is familiar enough: Clark Kent shows up in Metropolis and becomes a reporter with the Daily Planet. No sooner has he settled into his role than an alien invasion forces him to introduce the world to Superman. The success of any reboot depends on how exciting the creative team can make the classic beats, and how fresh the updated elements feel. Writer Straczynski (Rising Stars) and artist Davis (Green Lantern) do well enough with the familiar parts of the story. Reporter Clark hits the right mild-mannered notes, and Superman looks and feels super. The updating has its moments as well. Davis's art is dynamic, and his costume design adds a few grace notes to the iconic red-and-blue union suit. Straczynski's introduction of an alien menace with personal ties to Superman's home planet of Krypton is inspired, too. But other revisions are awkward: Clark's job search (which includes legend-making tryouts with pro sports teams and brilliant interviews with Fortune 500 companies) requires inconsistent characterization, and the Web-free Daily Planet seems quaint for a 2010 newspaper. Nonetheless, the built-in audience of Superman die-hards and Straczynski fans should all be happy to see a new treatment of a classic hero. (Nov.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright PWyxz LLC)

Synopsis:

Sixteen-year-old music-and-sound-design-obsessed Drea doesn't have friends. She has, as she's often reminded, issues. Having just moved to the latest in a string of new towns, Drea meets two other outsiders. Is her life about to change?

About the Author

Tara Kelly is a one girl band, writer, filmmaker, video editor, and digital photographer. Harmonic Feedback is her first published book.
 
www.thetaratracks.com

Product Details

ISBN:
9780805090109
Author:
Kelly, Tara E
Publisher:
Henry Holt & Company
Author:
Kelly, Tara
Subject:
Drug abuse
Subject:
Interpersonal Relations
Subject:
Social Issues - General
Subject:
Situations / General
Subject:
Children s Young Adult-Social Issue Fiction-General
Subject:
Children s Young Adult-Social Issue Fiction
Subject:
Situations / Special Needs
Subject:
Social Issues - Friendship
Subject:
Performing Arts - Music
Edition Description:
Trade Cloth
Publication Date:
20100531
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
from 9 up to 13
Language:
English
Pages:
288
Dimensions:
8.25 x 5.50 in
Age Level:
from 14 up to 19

Other books you might like

  1. Ruby Red (Ruby Red - Trilogy)
    Used Hardcover $11.95
  2. I Am Number Four #02: The Power of Six
    Used Hardcover $6.95
  3. Maze Runner Trilogy #02: The Scorch...
    Used Trade Paper $6.00
  4. Paintings from the Cave: Three Novellas Used Hardcover $6.95
  5. What You Wish for: A Book for Darfur New Hardcover $17.99
  6. Jasper Jones
    Sale Trade Paper $5.98

Related Subjects

Children's » Situations » General
Young Adult » General

Harmonic Feedback Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$11.95 In Stock
Product details 288 pages Henry Holt & Company - English 9780805090109 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "A story of how it feels to be an outsider, Kelly's debut follows the complex and candid thoughts of 16-year-old Drea, who is diagnosed with ADHD and borderline Asperger's syndrome. She is highly intelligent, but certain tasks, such as driving, and social interactions are challenging ('All I know is I make sense to me--it's other people who seem complicated,' she says). When she and her flighty mother move to yet another town to live with her ornery grandmother Drea wants to crawl into her shell. But then she meets flamboyant, attention-seeker Naomi and sensitive Justin, both of whom share the burden of unstable families and imperfect pasts. The trio bonds over a mutual love for making trip-hop music and a desire to trust someone, but Naomi's taste for danger and drugs soon distances her from her new friends. While Naomi's self-destruction follows a predictable downward spiral, the novel's strength lies in Drea's dynamic personality: a combination of surprising immaturity, childish wonder, and profound insight. Her search for stability and need to escape being labeled is poignant and convincing. Ages 14 — up. (May) This is DC's fourth try in the past 10 years to reintroduce Superman to a general audience. The story is familiar enough: Clark Kent shows up in Metropolis and becomes a reporter with the Daily Planet. No sooner has he settled into his role than an alien invasion forces him to introduce the world to Superman. The success of any reboot depends on how exciting the creative team can make the classic beats, and how fresh the updated elements feel. Writer Straczynski (Rising Stars) and artist Davis (Green Lantern) do well enough with the familiar parts of the story. Reporter Clark hits the right mild-mannered notes, and Superman looks and feels super. The updating has its moments as well. Davis's art is dynamic, and his costume design adds a few grace notes to the iconic red-and-blue union suit. Straczynski's introduction of an alien menace with personal ties to Superman's home planet of Krypton is inspired, too. But other revisions are awkward: Clark's job search (which includes legend-making tryouts with pro sports teams and brilliant interviews with Fortune 500 companies) requires inconsistent characterization, and the Web-free Daily Planet seems quaint for a 2010 newspaper. Nonetheless, the built-in audience of Superman die-hards and Straczynski fans should all be happy to see a new treatment of a classic hero. (Nov.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright PWyxz LLC)
"Synopsis" by , Sixteen-year-old music-and-sound-design-obsessed Drea doesn't have friends. She has, as she's often reminded, issues. Having just moved to the latest in a string of new towns, Drea meets two other outsiders. Is her life about to change?
spacer
spacer
  • back to top

FOLLOW US ON...

     
Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.