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Eaarth: Making a Life on a Tough New Planet

by

Eaarth: Making a Life on a Tough New Planet Cover

ISBN13: 9780805090567
ISBN10: 0805090568
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
All Product Details

 

Review-A-Day

"Eaarth offers an imperfect but provocative look at 'the architecture for the world that comes next, the dispersed and localized societies that can survive the damage we can no longer prevent.'" Edward Wolf, The Oregonian (Read the entire Oregonian review)

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Twenty years ago, with The End of Nature, Bill McKibben offered one of the earliest warnings about global warming. Those warnings went mostly unheeded; now, he insists, we need to acknowledge that we've waited too long, and that massive change is not only unavoidable but already under way. Our old familiar globe is suddenly melting, drying, acidifying, flooding, and burning in ways that no human has ever seen. We've created, in very short order, a new planet, still recognizable but fundamentally different. We may as well call it Eaarth.

That new planet is filled with new binds and traps. A changing world costs large sums to defend — think of the money that went to repair New Orleans, or the trillions it will take to transform our energy systems. But the endless economic growth that could underwrite such largesse depends on the stable planet we've managed to damage and degrade. We can't rely on old habits any longer.

Our hope depends, McKibben argues, on scaling back — on building the kind of societies and economies that can hunker down, concentrate on essentials, and create the type of community (in the neighborhood, but also on the Internet) that will allow us to weather trouble on an unprecedented scale. Change — fundamental change — is our best hope on a planet suddenly and violently out of balance.

Review:

"Read it, please. Straight through to the end. Whatever else you were planning to do next, nothing could be more important." Barbara Kingsolver

Review:

"Bill McKibben may be the world's best green journalist...What really sets Eaarth apart from other green books is McKibben's prescription for survival. This won't be just a matter of replacing a few lightbulbs; McKibben is calling for a more local existence lived 'lightly, carefully, gently.' It's a future unimaginable to most of us — but it may be the only way to survive." Time

Review:

"Eaarth is the name McKibben has decided to assign both to his new book and to the planet formerly known as Earth. His point is a fresh one that brings the reader uncomfortably close to climate change...Unlike many writers on environmental cataclysm, McKibben is actually a writer, and a very good one at that. He is smart enough to know that the reader needs a dark chuckle of a bone thrown at him now and then to keep plowing through the bad news." New York Times Book Review

Review:

"Superbly written...McKibben is at his best when offering an elegant tour of what is already going wrong and likely to get even worse.... Eaarth is a manifesto for radical measures." National Interest

Review:

"A valuable slice of acid-tongued reality." San Francisco Chronicle

Review:

"This book must be read and his message must be understood clearly in Congress and in the streets. Indeed, throughout the world." Capitol Times (Madison, Wis.)

Synopsis:

Twenty years ago, with The End of Nature, McKibben offered one of the earliest warnings about global warming. Those warnings went mostly unheeded; now, he insists, we need to acknowledge that we've waited too long, and that massive change is not only unavoidable but already under way. (Environmental Studies)

Synopsis:

Twenty years ago, in The End of Nature, McKibben warned about global warming. Now, he argues change is needed to address a planet out of balance. 

Synopsis:

A captivating exploration of the homing instinct in animals, and what it means for human happiness and survival, from the celebrated naturalist and author of Mind of the Raven, Why We Run, and Life Everlasting

Synopsis:

From John Muir to David Brower, from the creation of Yellowstone National Park to the Endangered Species Act, environmentalism in America has always had close to its core a preservationist ideal. Generations have been inspired by its ethosandmdash;to encircle nature with our protection, to keep it apart, pristine, walled against the march of human development. But we have to face the facts. Accelerating climate change, rapid urbanization, agricultural and industrial devastation, metastasizing fire regimes, and other quickening anthropogenic forces all attest to the same truth: the earth is now spinning through the age of humans. After Preservation takes stock of the ways we have tried to both preserve and exploit nature to ask a direct but profound question: what is the role of preservationism in an era of seemingly unstoppable human development, in what some have called the Anthropocene?

and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;

Ben A. Minteer and Stephen J. Pyne bring together a stunning consortium of voices comprised of renowned scientists, historians, philosophers, environmental writers, activists, policy makers, and land managers to negotiate the incredible challenges that environmentalism faces. Some call for a new, post-preservationist model, one that is far more pragmatic, interventionist, and human-centered. Others push forcefully back, arguing for a more chastened and restrained vision of human action on the earth. Some try to establish a middle ground, while others ruminate more deeply on the meaning and value of wilderness. Some write on species lost, others on species saved, and yet others discuss the enduring practical challenges of managing our land, water, and air.

From spirited optimism to careful prudence to critical skepticism, the resulting range of approaches offers an inspiring contribution to the landscape of modern environmentalism, one driven by serious, sustained engagements with the critical problems we must solve if weandmdash;and the wild garden we may now keepandmdash;are going to survive the era we have ushered in. and#160;

Contributors include: Chelsea K. Batavia, F. Stuart (Terry) Chapin III, Norman L. Christensen, Jamie Rappaport Clark, William Wallace Covington, Erle C. Ellis, Mark Fiege, Dave Foreman, Harry W. Greene, Emma Marris, Michelle Marvier, Bill McKibben, J. R. McNeill, Curt Meine, Ben A. Minteer, Michael Paul Nelson, Bryan Norton, Stephen J. Pyne, Andrew C. Revkin, Holmes Rolston III, Amy Seidl, Jack Ward Thomas, Diane J. Vosick, John A. Vucetich, and Hazel Wong.and#160;

Synopsis:

Acclaimed scientist and author Bernd Heinrich has returned every year since boyhood to a beloved patch of western Maine woods. What is the biology in humansand#160;of this deep-in-the-bones pull toward a particular place, and how is it related to animal homing?

Heinrich explores the fascinating science chipping away at the mysteries of animal migration:and#160;how geese imprint true visual landscape memory; how scent trails are used by many creatures, from fish to insects to amphibians, to pinpoint their home if they are displaced from it; and how the tiniest of songbirds are equipped for solar and magnetic orienteering over vast distances.and#160;Most movingly, Heinrich chronicles the spring return of a pair of sandhill cranes to their home pond in the Alaska tundra. With his trademark and#8220;marvelous, mind-alteringand#8221; prose (Los Angeles Times), he portrays the unmistakable signs of deep psychological emotion in the newly arrived birdsand#8212;and reminds us that to discount our own emotions toward home is to ignore biology itself.

About the Author

Bill McKibben is the author of The End of Nature, Deep Economy, and numerous other books. He is the founder of the environmental organizations Step It Up and 350.org, and was among the first to warn of the dangers of global warming. He is a scholar in residence at Middlebury College and lives in Vermont with his wife, the writer Sue Halpern, and their daughter.

Table of Contents

Prefaceand#8195;vii

Introductionand#8195;ix

I. Homing

Cranes Coming Homeand#8195;5

Beeliningand#8195;19

Getting to a Good Placeand#8195;37

By the Sun, Stars, and Magnetic Compassand#8195;63

Smelling Their Way Homeand#8195;95

Picking the Spotand#8195;109

II. Home-making and Maintaining

Architectures of Homeand#8195;125

Home-making in Surinameand#8195;151

Home Crashersand#8195;167

Charlotte II: A Home Within a Homeand#8195;181

The Communal Homeand#8195;201

III. Homing Implications

The In and Out of Boundariesand#8195;221

Of Trees, Rocks, a Bear, and a Homeand#8195;233

On Home Groundand#8195;247

Fire, Hearth, and Homeand#8195;269

Homing to the Herdand#8195;283

Epilogueand#8195;303

Acknowledgmentsand#8195;315

Further Readingand#8195;317

Indexand#8195;343

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 5 comments:

Janet Beck, January 1, 2013 (view all comments by Janet Beck)
Brave and necessary; everyone should read this!
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
thomcat, January 28, 2011 (view all comments by thomcat)
Saw this book at Powells, and read it. Out of 100 books I finished in 2010, this was easily the best.

The start of this book was like being forced to move out of your home due to foreclosure. Depressing, and you just know some of that was your own fault. Then the book gets better.

I really enjoyed the history behind the initial carbon dioxide target of 550 ppm and the solid science behind the newest target of 350 ppm. For nearly all of human history, we were at 275 ppm, and we won't be there again in my lifetime - or yours. Or your kids, or grand kids.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(1 of 2 readers found this comment helpful)
Justi, January 2, 2011 (view all comments by Justi)
Startling portrait of the earth as we have made it; horrifying, but offers uplifting, simple global solutions on a local scale.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(1 of 1 readers found this comment helpful)
View all 5 comments

Product Details

ISBN:
9780805090567
Subtitle:
Saving American Nature in the Age of Humans
Author:
McKibben, Bill
Author:
Heinrich, Bernd
Author:
Pyne, Stephen J.
Author:
McKibben, Bill
Author:
Minteer, Ben A.
Author:
Wyman, Oliver
Publisher:
University Of Chicago Press
Subject:
Climatic changes
Subject:
Global warming
Subject:
Human Geography
Subject:
Environmental Science
Subject:
Environmental Conservation & Protection - General
Subject:
Sustainable living
Subject:
Environmental Conservation & Protection
Subject:
Environmental Studies-Environment
Subject:
Animals
Edition Description:
Hardcover
Publication Date:
20150406
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
7 CDs, 9 hrs
Pages:
240
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

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Related Subjects


Home and Garden » Sustainable Living » General
Science and Mathematics » Agriculture » General
Science and Mathematics » Environmental Studies » Environment
Science and Mathematics » Environmental Studies » General
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Science and Mathematics » Nature Studies » General

Eaarth: Making a Life on a Tough New Planet Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$9.95 In Stock
Product details 240 pages Times Books - English 9780805090567 Reviews:
"Review A Day" by , "Eaarth offers an imperfect but provocative look at 'the architecture for the world that comes next, the dispersed and localized societies that can survive the damage we can no longer prevent.'" (Read the entire Oregonian review)
"Review" by , "Read it, please. Straight through to the end. Whatever else you were planning to do next, nothing could be more important."
"Review" by , "Bill McKibben may be the world's best green journalist...What really sets Eaarth apart from other green books is McKibben's prescription for survival. This won't be just a matter of replacing a few lightbulbs; McKibben is calling for a more local existence lived 'lightly, carefully, gently.' It's a future unimaginable to most of us — but it may be the only way to survive."
"Review" by , "Eaarth is the name McKibben has decided to assign both to his new book and to the planet formerly known as Earth. His point is a fresh one that brings the reader uncomfortably close to climate change...Unlike many writers on environmental cataclysm, McKibben is actually a writer, and a very good one at that. He is smart enough to know that the reader needs a dark chuckle of a bone thrown at him now and then to keep plowing through the bad news."
"Review" by , "Superbly written...McKibben is at his best when offering an elegant tour of what is already going wrong and likely to get even worse.... Eaarth is a manifesto for radical measures."
"Review" by , "A valuable slice of acid-tongued reality."
"Review" by , "This book must be read and his message must be understood clearly in Congress and in the streets. Indeed, throughout the world." (Madison, Wis.)
"Synopsis" by , Twenty years ago, with The End of Nature, McKibben offered one of the earliest warnings about global warming. Those warnings went mostly unheeded; now, he insists, we need to acknowledge that we've waited too long, and that massive change is not only unavoidable but already under way. (Environmental Studies)
"Synopsis" by ,
Twenty years ago, in The End of Nature, McKibben warned about global warming. Now, he argues change is needed to address a planet out of balance. 
"Synopsis" by , A captivating exploration of the homing instinct in animals, and what it means for human happiness and survival, from the celebrated naturalist and author of Mind of the Raven, Why We Run, and Life Everlasting
"Synopsis" by ,
From John Muir to David Brower, from the creation of Yellowstone National Park to the Endangered Species Act, environmentalism in America has always had close to its core a preservationist ideal. Generations have been inspired by its ethosandmdash;to encircle nature with our protection, to keep it apart, pristine, walled against the march of human development. But we have to face the facts. Accelerating climate change, rapid urbanization, agricultural and industrial devastation, metastasizing fire regimes, and other quickening anthropogenic forces all attest to the same truth: the earth is now spinning through the age of humans. After Preservation takes stock of the ways we have tried to both preserve and exploit nature to ask a direct but profound question: what is the role of preservationism in an era of seemingly unstoppable human development, in what some have called the Anthropocene?

and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;

Ben A. Minteer and Stephen J. Pyne bring together a stunning consortium of voices comprised of renowned scientists, historians, philosophers, environmental writers, activists, policy makers, and land managers to negotiate the incredible challenges that environmentalism faces. Some call for a new, post-preservationist model, one that is far more pragmatic, interventionist, and human-centered. Others push forcefully back, arguing for a more chastened and restrained vision of human action on the earth. Some try to establish a middle ground, while others ruminate more deeply on the meaning and value of wilderness. Some write on species lost, others on species saved, and yet others discuss the enduring practical challenges of managing our land, water, and air.

From spirited optimism to careful prudence to critical skepticism, the resulting range of approaches offers an inspiring contribution to the landscape of modern environmentalism, one driven by serious, sustained engagements with the critical problems we must solve if weandmdash;and the wild garden we may now keepandmdash;are going to survive the era we have ushered in. and#160;

Contributors include: Chelsea K. Batavia, F. Stuart (Terry) Chapin III, Norman L. Christensen, Jamie Rappaport Clark, William Wallace Covington, Erle C. Ellis, Mark Fiege, Dave Foreman, Harry W. Greene, Emma Marris, Michelle Marvier, Bill McKibben, J. R. McNeill, Curt Meine, Ben A. Minteer, Michael Paul Nelson, Bryan Norton, Stephen J. Pyne, Andrew C. Revkin, Holmes Rolston III, Amy Seidl, Jack Ward Thomas, Diane J. Vosick, John A. Vucetich, and Hazel Wong.and#160;

"Synopsis" by ,
Acclaimed scientist and author Bernd Heinrich has returned every year since boyhood to a beloved patch of western Maine woods. What is the biology in humansand#160;of this deep-in-the-bones pull toward a particular place, and how is it related to animal homing?

Heinrich explores the fascinating science chipping away at the mysteries of animal migration:and#160;how geese imprint true visual landscape memory; how scent trails are used by many creatures, from fish to insects to amphibians, to pinpoint their home if they are displaced from it; and how the tiniest of songbirds are equipped for solar and magnetic orienteering over vast distances.and#160;Most movingly, Heinrich chronicles the spring return of a pair of sandhill cranes to their home pond in the Alaska tundra. With his trademark and#8220;marvelous, mind-alteringand#8221; prose (Los Angeles Times), he portrays the unmistakable signs of deep psychological emotion in the newly arrived birdsand#8212;and reminds us that to discount our own emotions toward home is to ignore biology itself.

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