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2 Burnside Russia- General Russian History
25 Local Warehouse Russia- General Russian History
25 Remote Warehouse Russia- General Russian History

This title in other editions

Revolutionary Russia, 1891-1991: A History

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Revolutionary Russia, 1891-1991: A History Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

From the author of A Peoples Tragedy, an original reading of the Russian Revolution, examining it not as a single event but as a hundred-year cycle of violence in pursuit of utopian dreams

In this elegant and incisive account, Orlando Figes offers an illuminating new perspective on the Russian Revolution. While other historians have focused their examinations on the cataclysmic years immediately before and after 1917, Figes shows how the revolution, while it changed in form and character, nevertheless retained the same idealistic goals throughout, from its origins in the famine crisis of 1891 until its end with the collapse of the communist Soviet regime in 1991.

Figes traces three generational phases: Lenin and the Bolsheviks, who set the pattern of destruction and renewal until their demise in the terror of the 1930s; the Stalinist generation, promoted from the lower classes, who created the lasting structures of the Soviet regime and consolidated its legitimacy through victory in war; and the generation of 1956, shaped by the revelations of Stalins crimes and committed to “making the Revolution work” to remedy economic decline and mass disaffection. Until the very end of the Soviet system, its leaders believed they were carrying out the revolution Lenin had begun.

With the authority and distinctive style that have marked his magisterial histories, Figes delivers an accessible and paradigm-shifting reconsideration of one of the defining events of the twentieth century.

Review:

"Figes (A People's Tragedy) covers familiar terrain in his new account of Russia and its revolution with a sharp and confident analysis. He presents a centurylong revolution stretching from 1891 to 1991, and divides it into three phases: the rise of the Bolsheviks, Stalin's rule, and the repercussions of Khruschev's denouncement of Stalin. Figes works to dispel the mythology that still surrounds Lenin, Stalin, and the Revolution, plenty of which still survives in the West even after the Cold War. He reminds us that Lenin 'was a stranger to Russia,' having spent most of the preceding 17 years outside the country, and that the Bolshevik storming of the Winter Palace was more like a house arrest, a coup d'état that few observers, including some Bolsheviks, thought could last. Analyzing Stalin's leadership, Figes notes that even though intelligence reports suggested the Germans were massing for an attack in 1941, Stalin ignored the signs and, due to fears inspired by his Great Terror, his military commanders refused to contradict him. Figes strips away the propaganda and nostalgia to emphasize the Revolution's destructive powers, a perspective that is all the more relevant as Vladimir Putin seeks to capitalize on many Russians' hunger for the so-called glory days of the Soviet Union." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

About the Author

Orlando Figes is the author of eight books on Russia that have been translated into twenty-seven languages; they include The Whisperers, A Peoples Tragedy, Natashas Dance, and Just Send Me Word. A professor of history at Birkbeck, University of London and a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books, Figes is the recipient of the Wolfon History Prize, the W. H. Smith Literary Award, the NCR Book Award, and the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, among others.

Table of Contents

Introduction          1 


1. The Start          7


2. The ‘Dress Rehearsal          24


3. Last Hopes          39


4. War and Revolution          54


5. The February Revolution          68


6. Lenins Revolution          89


7. Civil War and the Making of the Soviet System          108


8. Lenin, Trotsky and Stalin          125


9. The Revolutions Golden Age?          135


10. The Great Break          149


11. Stalins Crisis          163


12. Communism in Retreat?          176


13. The Great Terror          190


14. Revolution for Export          204


15. War and Revolution          217


16. Revolution and Cold War          230


17. The Beginning of the End          244


18. Mature Socialism          260


19. The Last Bolshevik          273


20. Judgement          288

Notes          297


A Short Guide to Further Reading          306


Acknowledgments          309


Index          311

Product Details

ISBN:
9780805091311
Author:
Figes, Orlando
Publisher:
Metropolitan Books
Subject:
Russia-General Russian History
Subject:
Russia (pre & post Soviet Union)
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20140431
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Pages:
336
Dimensions:
8.25 x 5.5 in

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Russia » General Russian History
History and Social Science » Russia » Russian Revolution

Revolutionary Russia, 1891-1991: A History New Hardcover
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Product details 336 pages Metropolitan Books - English 9780805091311 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Figes (A People's Tragedy) covers familiar terrain in his new account of Russia and its revolution with a sharp and confident analysis. He presents a centurylong revolution stretching from 1891 to 1991, and divides it into three phases: the rise of the Bolsheviks, Stalin's rule, and the repercussions of Khruschev's denouncement of Stalin. Figes works to dispel the mythology that still surrounds Lenin, Stalin, and the Revolution, plenty of which still survives in the West even after the Cold War. He reminds us that Lenin 'was a stranger to Russia,' having spent most of the preceding 17 years outside the country, and that the Bolshevik storming of the Winter Palace was more like a house arrest, a coup d'état that few observers, including some Bolsheviks, thought could last. Analyzing Stalin's leadership, Figes notes that even though intelligence reports suggested the Germans were massing for an attack in 1941, Stalin ignored the signs and, due to fears inspired by his Great Terror, his military commanders refused to contradict him. Figes strips away the propaganda and nostalgia to emphasize the Revolution's destructive powers, a perspective that is all the more relevant as Vladimir Putin seeks to capitalize on many Russians' hunger for the so-called glory days of the Soviet Union." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
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