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This title in other editions

Showdown: JFK and the Integration of the Washington Redskins

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Showdown: JFK and the Integration of the Washington Redskins Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In 1961—as America crackled with racial tension—the Washington Redskins stood alone as the only professional football team without a black player on its roster. In fact, during the entire twenty-five-year history of the franchise, no African American had ever played for George Preston Marshall, the Redskins’ cantankerous principal owner. With slicked-down white hair and angular facial features, the nattily attired, sixty-four-year-old NFL team owner already had a well-deserved reputation for flamboyance, showmanship, and erratic behavior. And like other Southern-born segregationists, Marshall stood firm against race-mixing. “We’ll start signing Negroes,” he once boasted, “when the Harlem Globetrotters start signing whites.” But that was about to change.

 

Opposing Marshall was Interior Secretary Stewart Udall, whose determination that the Redskins—or “Paleskins,” as he called them—reflect John F. Kennedy’s New Frontier ideals led to one of the most high-profile contests to spill beyond the sports pages. Realizing that racial justice and gridiron success had the potential either to dovetail or take an ugly turn, civil rights advocates and sports fans alike anxiously turned their eyes toward the nation’s capital. There was always the possibility that Marshall—one of the NFL’s most influential and dominating founding fathers—might defy demands from the Kennedy administration to desegregate his lily-white team. When further pressured to desegregate by the press, Marshall remained defiant, declaring that no one, including the White House, could tell him how to run his business.

 

In Showdown, sports historian Thomas G. Smith captures this striking moment, one that held sweeping implications not only for one team’s racist policy but also for a sharply segregated city and for the nation as a whole. Part sports history, part civil rights story, this compelling and untold narrative serves as a powerful lens onto racism in sport, illustrating how, in microcosm, the fight to desegregate the Redskins was part of a wider struggle against racial injustice in America.

Review:

"Although this provocative title promises a focused account of how President Kennedy forced the Redskins to integrate in the early 1960s — making them the last team in the NFL to do so — historian Smith covers a much broader swath. He opens with a brief prologue establishing the showdown, but it isn't until midway through the book that he returns to describe how Stewart Udall, Kennedy's secretary of the interior, forced Redskins founder and owner George Marshall to draft black players by threatening to cancel the team's lease on D.C. Stadium (later renamed RFK Stadium). The first half details the Redskins' origins in Boston in 1932 (the team moved to Washington in 1937) on through the 1960s. Smith offers a comprehensive look at the life of Marshall, an innovator in the development of the modern NFL, who Smith paints as a 'hidebound racist.' Despite Kennedy's name prominently in the title, JFK played only a sideline role in the conflict. Readers hoping for insight into another facet of his presidency will be sorely disappointed, but those interested in the story of Marshall and the first 30 years of the Washington Redskins will find much to relish. (Sept.)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

A classic NFL/civil rights story--the showdown between the Washington Redskins and the Kennedy White House.

In the 1960s, America hummed with tension as professional football leagues and civil rights advocates struggled to level their respective playing fields. For the Washington Redskins--the last NFL team to integrate and the only one to have been forced to do so by presidential order--tensions ran even higher. In Showdown, sports historian Thomas Smith captures a striking moment, one that held sweeping implications not only for one team's racist policy but also for a sharply segregated city and--nationally--for the implementation of New Frontier-era integration efforts. It's a story about a country newly shaped by post-World War II ideas about America's image abroad, cold-war consciousness over political power grabs, and, of course, the civil rights movement. 

About the Author

Thomas G. Smith is a member of the history program at Nichols College, where he serves as the Robert Stansky Distinguished Professor. A sports and environmental historian, he is the author of two books, Independent: A Biography of Lewis Douglas (with Bob Browder) and Green Republican: John Saylor and the Preservation of America’s Wilderness. He lives in Dudley, Massachusetts, and is a fervent fan of the New England Patriots and Los Angeles Dodgers.

Table of Contents

 

Prologue “Redskins Told: Integrate or Else”

1 Boston Beginnings

2 Out of Bounds

3 The Redskins March

4 Leveling the Field

5 The Washington Whiteskins

6 The Owner, the Journalist, and the Hustler

7 The Black Blitz

8 The New Frontier

9 Showdown

10 Hail Victory

11 Running Out the Clock

Epilogue

 

Acknowledgments

Notes on Sources

Notes

Selected Bibliography

Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9780807000748
Author:
Smith, Thomas G
Publisher:
Beacon Press (MA)
Author:
Smith, Thomas G.
Subject:
General Sports & Recreation
Subject:
Football
Subject:
Sports and Fitness-Football General
Subject:
Politics-United States Politics
Subject:
Sports and Fitness-Sports General
Publication Date:
20110931
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
80000 WORDS
Pages:
256
Dimensions:
9.26 x 6.21 x 1.03 in 1.2 lb

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Politics » United States » Politics
History and Social Science » World History » General
Sports and Outdoors » Sports and Fitness » Football » General
Sports and Outdoors » Sports and Fitness » Sociology of Sports
Sports and Outdoors » Sports and Fitness » Sports General

Showdown: JFK and the Integration of the Washington Redskins Used Hardcover
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Product details 256 pages Beacon Press - English 9780807000748 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Although this provocative title promises a focused account of how President Kennedy forced the Redskins to integrate in the early 1960s — making them the last team in the NFL to do so — historian Smith covers a much broader swath. He opens with a brief prologue establishing the showdown, but it isn't until midway through the book that he returns to describe how Stewart Udall, Kennedy's secretary of the interior, forced Redskins founder and owner George Marshall to draft black players by threatening to cancel the team's lease on D.C. Stadium (later renamed RFK Stadium). The first half details the Redskins' origins in Boston in 1932 (the team moved to Washington in 1937) on through the 1960s. Smith offers a comprehensive look at the life of Marshall, an innovator in the development of the modern NFL, who Smith paints as a 'hidebound racist.' Despite Kennedy's name prominently in the title, JFK played only a sideline role in the conflict. Readers hoping for insight into another facet of his presidency will be sorely disappointed, but those interested in the story of Marshall and the first 30 years of the Washington Redskins will find much to relish. (Sept.)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by , A classic NFL/civil rights story--the showdown between the Washington Redskins and the Kennedy White House.

In the 1960s, America hummed with tension as professional football leagues and civil rights advocates struggled to level their respective playing fields. For the Washington Redskins--the last NFL team to integrate and the only one to have been forced to do so by presidential order--tensions ran even higher. In Showdown, sports historian Thomas Smith captures a striking moment, one that held sweeping implications not only for one team's racist policy but also for a sharply segregated city and--nationally--for the implementation of New Frontier-era integration efforts. It's a story about a country newly shaped by post-World War II ideas about America's image abroad, cold-war consciousness over political power grabs, and, of course, the civil rights movement. 

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