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Matzoh Ball Gumbo: Culinary Tales of the Jewish South

by

Matzoh Ball Gumbo: Culinary Tales of the Jewish South Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Since early colonial times in America, Jewish southerners have been tempted by delectable regional foods. Because some of these foods--including pork and shellfish--have been traditionally forbidden to Jews by religious dietary laws, southern Jews face a special predicament. In a culinary journey through the Jewish South, Arkansas native Marcie Cohen Ferris explores how southern Jews embraced, avoided, and adapted southern food and, in the process, have found themselves at home.

From colonial Savannah and Charleston to Civil War era New Orleans and Natchez, from New South Atlanta to contemporary Memphis and across the Mississippi and Arkansas Deltas, Ferris examines the expressive power of food throughout southern Jewish history. She demonstrates how southern Jews reinvented traditions as they adjusted to living in a largely Christian world where they were bound by regional rules of race, class, and gender.

Featuring a trove of photographs, Matzoh Ball Gumbo also includes anecdotes, oral histories, and more than thirty recipes to try at home. Ferris's rich tour of southern Jewish foodways shows that, at the dining table, Jewish southerners created a distinctive religious expression that reflects the evolution of southern Jewish life.

Review:

"Many traditional Southern foods — pulled-pork barbecue, crab cakes, fried oyster po' boys, to name a few — violate traditional Jewish dietary laws, which forbid the consumption of pork and shellfish. What's a Southern Jew to do? Anthropological historian Ferris (UNC — Chapel Hill) answers that question in a gustatory tour of the Jewish South. She uncovers many dishes that blend Jewish and Southern foodways (recipes included for such tasties as Temple Israel Brisket and Cornmeal-Fried Fish Fillets with Sephardic Vinagre Sauce). Ferris sees food as a symbol that encompasses the problem of how Jews live in a region dominated by Christians: 'The most tangible way to understand Jewish history and culture in the South is at the dinner table.' Cynics will wonder if a Jewish kugel (noodle casserole) prepared in the South is really any different from kugel in Chicago. Ferris's answer is an emphatic yes — because Jews in the South face different challenges than those in Chicago. Southern Jews must be more intentional about cooking that kugel and passing the recipe down from generation to generation. If this book were a restaurant, Michelin would award it two out of three stars: not absolutely first-rate, but 'excellent cooking, worth a detour.'" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Synopsis:

From the colonial era to the present, Ferris examines the expressive power of food throughout Southern Jewish history. She demonstrates how Southern Jews reinvented culinary traditions as they adjusted to living in a largely Christian region where forbidden foods such as pork, shrimp, oysters, and crab are intensely popular. Richly illustrated, this culinary tour of the Jewish South includes anecdotes, oral histories, and more than thirty recipes to try at home.

Synopsis:

Since early colonial times in America, Jewish southerners have been tempted by delectable regional foods. Because some of these foods--including pork and shellfish--have been traditionally forbidden to Jews by religious dietary laws, southern Jews face a special predicament. In a culinary journey through the Jewish South, Arkansas native Marcie Cohen Ferris explores how southern Jews embraced, avoided, and adapted southern food and, in the process, have found themselves at home.

From colonial Savannah and Charleston to Civil War era New Orleans and Natchez, from New South Atlanta to contemporary Memphis and across the Mississippi and Arkansas Deltas, Ferris examines the expressive power of food throughout southern Jewish history. She demonstrates how southern Jews reinvented traditions as they adjusted to living in a largely Christian world where they were bound by regional rules of race, class, and gender.

Featuring a trove of photographs, Matzoh Ball Gumbo also includes anecdotes, oral histories, and more than thirty recipes to try at home. Ferris's rich tour of southern Jewish foodways shows that, at the dining table, Jewish southerners created a distinctive religious expression that reflects the evolution of southern Jewish life.

About the Author

Marcie Cohen Ferris is associate director of the Carolina Center for Jewish Studies and assistant professor of American studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She is also vice president of the Southern Foodways Alliance.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780807829783
Author:
Ferris, Marcie Cohen
Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
Subject:
Cookery, american
Subject:
Jews
Subject:
Regional & Ethnic - American - Southern States
Subject:
Regional & Ethnic - Jewish & Kosher
Subject:
Jewish studies
Subject:
Jewish & Kosher
Subject:
Jewish cookery
Subject:
Cookery, American -- Southern style.
Subject:
American Jewish history; Southern Jews; Jewish holidays; kashrut; southern folklore; southern foodways; barbecue; Low Country; Delta; Memphis, Tennessee; Savannah, Georgia; Charleston, South Carolina; New Orleans, Louisiana; Montgomery, Alabama; Atlanta,
Subject:
American Jewish history; Southern Jews; Jewish holidays; kashrut; southern folklore; southern foodways; barbecue; Low Country; Delta; Memphis, Tennessee; Savannah, Georgia; Charleston, South Carolina; New Orleans, Louisiana; Montgomery, Alabama; Atlanta,
Subject:
American Jewish history; Southern Jews; Jewish holidays; kashrut; southern folklore; southern foodways; barbecue; Low Country; Delta; Memphis, Tennessee; Savannah, Georgia; Charleston, South Carolina; New Orleans, Louisiana; Montgomery, Alabama; Atlanta,
Subject:
American Jewish history; Southern Jews; Jewish holidays; kashrut; southern folklore; southern foodways; barbecue; Low Country; Delta; Memphis, Tennessee; Savannah, Georgia; Charleston, South Carolina; New Orleans, Louisiana; Montgomery, Alabama; Atlanta,
Subject:
American Jewish history; Southern Jews; Jewish holidays; kashrut; southern folklore; southern foodways; barbecue; Low Country; Delta; Memphis, Tennessee; Savannah, Georgia; Charleston, South Carolina; New Orleans, Louisiana; Montgomery, Alabama; Atlanta,
Subject:
American Jewish history; Southern Jews; Jewish holidays; kashrut; southern folklore; southern foodways; barbecue; Low Country; Delta; Memphis, Tennessee; Savannah, Georgia; Charleston, South Carolina; New Orleans, Louisiana; Montgomery, Alabama; Atlanta,
Subject:
American Jewish history; Southern Jews; Jewish holidays; kashrut; southern folklore; southern foodways; barbecue; Low Country; Delta; Memphis, Tennessee; Savannah, Georgia; Charleston, South Carolina; New Orleans, Louisiana; Montgomery, Alabama; Atlanta,
Subject:
American Jewish history; Southern Jews; Jewish holidays; kashrut; southern folklore; southern foodways; barbecue; Low Country; Delta; Memphis, Tennessee; Savannah, Georgia; Charleston, South Carolina; New Orleans, Louisiana; Montgomery, Alabama; Atlanta,
Subject:
American Jewish history; Southern Jews; Jewish holidays; kashrut; southern folklore; southern foodways; barbecue; Low Country; Delta; Memphis, Tennessee; Savannah, Georgia; Charleston, South Carolina; New Orleans, Louisiana; Montgomery, Alabama; Atlanta,
Subject:
American Jewish history; Southern Jews; Jewish holidays; kashrut; southern folklore; southern foodways; barbecue; Low Country; Delta; Memphis, Tennessee; Savannah, Georgia; Charleston, South Carolina; New Orleans, Louisiana; Montgomery, Alabama; Atlanta,
Subject:
American Jewish History
Subject:
Southern Jews
Subject:
Jewish holidays
Subject:
kashrut
Subject:
southern folklore
Subject:
southern foodways
Subject:
Barbecue
Subject:
Low Country
Subject:
Delta
Subject:
Memphis, Tennessee
Subject:
Savannah, Georgia
Subject:
Charleston, south carolina
Subject:
New Orleans, Louisiana
Subject:
Montgomery, alabama
Subject:
Atlanta, Georgia
Subject:
Natchez, mississippi
Subject:
Arkansas
Subject:
Mississippi river
Subject:
colonial South
Subject:
New South
Subject:
Civil war
Subject:
Antebellum South
Subject:
Antisemitism
Subject:
Leo Frank
Subject:
Harry Golden
Subject:
Cooking and Food-Jewish
Copyright:
Publication Date:
October 2005
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Pages:
344
Dimensions:
10 x 7 in

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Related Subjects

Cooking and Food » Regional and Ethnic » Jewish
Cooking and Food » Regional and Ethnic » United States » Southern
History and Social Science » Sociology » Jewish Studies
Sports and Outdoors » Outdoors » Fishing and Hunting » Fishing » General

Matzoh Ball Gumbo: Culinary Tales of the Jewish South Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$21.00 In Stock
Product details 344 pages University of North Carolina Press - English 9780807829783 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Many traditional Southern foods — pulled-pork barbecue, crab cakes, fried oyster po' boys, to name a few — violate traditional Jewish dietary laws, which forbid the consumption of pork and shellfish. What's a Southern Jew to do? Anthropological historian Ferris (UNC — Chapel Hill) answers that question in a gustatory tour of the Jewish South. She uncovers many dishes that blend Jewish and Southern foodways (recipes included for such tasties as Temple Israel Brisket and Cornmeal-Fried Fish Fillets with Sephardic Vinagre Sauce). Ferris sees food as a symbol that encompasses the problem of how Jews live in a region dominated by Christians: 'The most tangible way to understand Jewish history and culture in the South is at the dinner table.' Cynics will wonder if a Jewish kugel (noodle casserole) prepared in the South is really any different from kugel in Chicago. Ferris's answer is an emphatic yes — because Jews in the South face different challenges than those in Chicago. Southern Jews must be more intentional about cooking that kugel and passing the recipe down from generation to generation. If this book were a restaurant, Michelin would award it two out of three stars: not absolutely first-rate, but 'excellent cooking, worth a detour.'" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by , From the colonial era to the present, Ferris examines the expressive power of food throughout Southern Jewish history. She demonstrates how Southern Jews reinvented culinary traditions as they adjusted to living in a largely Christian region where forbidden foods such as pork, shrimp, oysters, and crab are intensely popular. Richly illustrated, this culinary tour of the Jewish South includes anecdotes, oral histories, and more than thirty recipes to try at home.
"Synopsis" by , Since early colonial times in America, Jewish southerners have been tempted by delectable regional foods. Because some of these foods--including pork and shellfish--have been traditionally forbidden to Jews by religious dietary laws, southern Jews face a special predicament. In a culinary journey through the Jewish South, Arkansas native Marcie Cohen Ferris explores how southern Jews embraced, avoided, and adapted southern food and, in the process, have found themselves at home.

From colonial Savannah and Charleston to Civil War era New Orleans and Natchez, from New South Atlanta to contemporary Memphis and across the Mississippi and Arkansas Deltas, Ferris examines the expressive power of food throughout southern Jewish history. She demonstrates how southern Jews reinvented traditions as they adjusted to living in a largely Christian world where they were bound by regional rules of race, class, and gender.

Featuring a trove of photographs, Matzoh Ball Gumbo also includes anecdotes, oral histories, and more than thirty recipes to try at home. Ferris's rich tour of southern Jewish foodways shows that, at the dining table, Jewish southerners created a distinctive religious expression that reflects the evolution of southern Jewish life.

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