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This title in other editions

Not in Front of the Children: Indencency, Censorship, and the Innocence of Youth

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Not in Front of the Children: Indencency, Censorship, and the Innocence of Youth Cover

ISBN13: 9780809073993
ISBN10: 0809073994
Condition: Standard
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

From Huckleberry Finn to Harry Potter, from Internet filters to the v-chip, censorship exercised on behalf of children and adolescents is often based on the assumption that they must be protected from "indecent" information that might harm their development – whether in art, in literature, or on a website. But where does this assumption come from, and is it true?

In Not in Front of the Children, Marjorie Heins explores the fascinating history of "indecency" laws and other restrictions aimed at protecting youth. From Plato's argument for rigid censorship, through Victorian laws aimed at repressing libidinous thoughts, to contemporary battles over sex education in public schools and violence in the media, Heins guides us through what became, and remains, an ideological minefield. With fascinating examples drawn from around the globe, she suggests that the "harm to minors" argument rests on shaky foundations.

There is an urgent need for informed, dispassionate debate about the perceived conflict between the free-expression rights of young people and the widespread urge to shield them from expression that is considered harmful. Not in Front of the Children will spur this long-needed conversation. – www.epic.org

Review:

"In recent years the rights of young people have come under siege from the left and the right. Their civil liberties are systematically compromised, eroded, and denied in the name of public safety and the so-called best interests of the child. Heins examines the long history of 'protecting' children from 'indecency.' Her analysis exposes hidden political agendas, ideological underpinnings, and fallacious logic. In challenging our most basic assumptions about children, Heins breaks new ground, facilitating a dialogue that's long overdue. Scholars, educators, civil libertarians, legislators, students, and young people and their advocates will find this an invaluable resource." Donna Gaines, author of Teenage Wasteland: Suburbia's Dead End Kids

Review:

"Not in Front of the Children is an indispensable resource for anyone curious about censorship designed to 'protect' young people, and an eloquent argument for more thoughtful dialogue about helping kids grow up without stifling their spirit." Judy Blume

Synopsis:

The first comprehensive history of the debate about censorship designed to protect children

From Huckleberry Finn to Harry Potter, Internet filters to the V-chip, censorship is often based on the assumption that children and adolescents must be protected from "indecent" information that might harm their development — whether in art, in literature, or on a Web site. But where does this assumption come from, and is it true? In "Not in Front of the Children, a pathbreaking history of "indecency" laws and other restrictions aimed at protecting youth, Marjorie Heins suggests that the "harm-to-minors" argument rests on shaky foundations.

Synopsis:

The first comprehensive history of the debate about censorship designed to protect children From Huckleberry Finn to Harry Potter, Internet filters to the V-chip, censorship is often based on the assumption that children and adolescents must be protected from "indecent" information that might harm their development — whether in art, in literature, or on a Web site. But where does this assumption come from, and is it true? In Not in Front of the Children, a pathbreaking history of "indecency" laws and other restrictions aimed at protecting youth, Marjorie Heins suggests that the "harm-to-minors" argument rests on shaky foundations. 18 B&W Illustrations, Notes, Index

Synopsis:

The first comprehensive history of the debate about censorship designed to protect children and winner of the ALA's 2002 Eli Oboler Award for best-published work in the area of intellectual freedom

From Huckleberry Finn to Harry Potter, Internet filters to the V-chip, censorship is often based on the assumption that children and adolescents must be protected from "indecent" information that might harm their development — whether in art, in literature, or on a Web site. But where does this assumption come from, and is it true? In Not in Front of the Children, a pathbreaking history of "indecency" laws and other restrictions aimed at protecting youth, Marjorie Heins suggests that the "harm-to-minors" argument rests on shaky foundations.

About the Author

Marjorie Heins is the Director of the Free Expression Policy Project, National Coalition Against Censorship. She is the author, most recently, of Sex, Sin, and Blasphemy: A Guide to America's Censorship Wars. She lives in New York City.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 2 comments:

juma, March 16, 2010 (view all comments by juma)
You know, I'm very distressed by the way children are learnimg violence, killing, lack of compassion, scorn anything religeous or patriotic and sex at very young ages. I have been thinking about these issues for some time. It seems to me that the degeneration of our kids started way back when Health classes in schools were replaced by sex education. Then we had some powerful people behind Madelyn murray o'hare and censorship was removed. (Banned in Boston). Consequently music wasn't music anymore; just a bunch of groups and singers who tried to outdo each other with the loud instruments and no sense of decency where lyrics are concerned. And the violence, sex and murder they see on television would desensitize anyone. So many millions of children have no competent parent or other to guide and protect them.

Yes, I'm all for censorship when it comes to what our very young children are exposed to. They don't have childhoods anymore. They know everything by the time they're five years old. What do they have to look forward to? This country is, to quote Merle Haggard, rolling downhill like a snowball headed for hell.
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Alvinhageman, October 25, 2007 (view all comments by Alvinhageman)
Finally a good book against censorship that provides a logical agrument...I'm a 17 year old in school who is doing a speech in english class as of the moment on this very topic and I believe that this book is a good example that maybe by becoming to "censor happy" the government in essence actually hurts minors by displaying that it is unsuitable for minors, which in my opinion at least would actually spark a minor's curiosity to find out why they cant look at it but adults can.Another thing I believe is that maybe instead of blaming the government for exposure to that information that is "harmful to minors", parents should take some action in deciding what is right for their children.There are many programs that can block access to content that the parents deem unsuitable and as for television the v-chip is a good idea.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780809073993
Subtitle:
"Indecency," Censorship, and the Innocence of Youth
Author:
Heins, Marjorie
Publisher:
Hill and Wang
Location:
New York
Subject:
Children's Studies
Subject:
United states
Subject:
Legal History
Subject:
Youth
Subject:
Censorship
Subject:
Media & the Law
Subject:
National characteristics, american
Subject:
Obscenity.
Copyright:
Edition Number:
1st pbk. ed.
Series Volume:
3959
Publication Date:
20020210
Binding:
TP
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Yes
Pages:
416
Dimensions:
8.34x5.44x1.13 in. 1.06 lbs.

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Law » General

Not in Front of the Children: Indencency, Censorship, and the Innocence of Youth Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$4.50 In Stock
Product details 416 pages Hill & Wang - English 9780809073993 Reviews:
"Review" by , "In recent years the rights of young people have come under siege from the left and the right. Their civil liberties are systematically compromised, eroded, and denied in the name of public safety and the so-called best interests of the child. Heins examines the long history of 'protecting' children from 'indecency.' Her analysis exposes hidden political agendas, ideological underpinnings, and fallacious logic. In challenging our most basic assumptions about children, Heins breaks new ground, facilitating a dialogue that's long overdue. Scholars, educators, civil libertarians, legislators, students, and young people and their advocates will find this an invaluable resource."
"Review" by , "Not in Front of the Children is an indispensable resource for anyone curious about censorship designed to 'protect' young people, and an eloquent argument for more thoughtful dialogue about helping kids grow up without stifling their spirit."
"Synopsis" by ,
The first comprehensive history of the debate about censorship designed to protect children

From Huckleberry Finn to Harry Potter, Internet filters to the V-chip, censorship is often based on the assumption that children and adolescents must be protected from "indecent" information that might harm their development — whether in art, in literature, or on a Web site. But where does this assumption come from, and is it true? In "Not in Front of the Children, a pathbreaking history of "indecency" laws and other restrictions aimed at protecting youth, Marjorie Heins suggests that the "harm-to-minors" argument rests on shaky foundations.
"Synopsis" by , The first comprehensive history of the debate about censorship designed to protect children From Huckleberry Finn to Harry Potter, Internet filters to the V-chip, censorship is often based on the assumption that children and adolescents must be protected from "indecent" information that might harm their development — whether in art, in literature, or on a Web site. But where does this assumption come from, and is it true? In Not in Front of the Children, a pathbreaking history of "indecency" laws and other restrictions aimed at protecting youth, Marjorie Heins suggests that the "harm-to-minors" argument rests on shaky foundations. 18 B&W Illustrations, Notes, Index
"Synopsis" by ,
The first comprehensive history of the debate about censorship designed to protect children and winner of the ALA's 2002 Eli Oboler Award for best-published work in the area of intellectual freedom

From Huckleberry Finn to Harry Potter, Internet filters to the V-chip, censorship is often based on the assumption that children and adolescents must be protected from "indecent" information that might harm their development — whether in art, in literature, or on a Web site. But where does this assumption come from, and is it true? In Not in Front of the Children, a pathbreaking history of "indecency" laws and other restrictions aimed at protecting youth, Marjorie Heins suggests that the "harm-to-minors" argument rests on shaky foundations.

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