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This title in other editions

All in the Family: The Realignment of American Democracy Since the 1960s

by

All in the Family: The Realignment of American Democracy Since the 1960s Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In the 1960s, Lyndon Johnsons Great Society and War on Poverty promised an array of federal programs to assist working-class families. In the 1980s, Ronald Reagan declared the GOP the party of “family values” and promised to keep government out of Americans lives. Again and again, historians have sought to explain the nations profound political realignment from the 1960s to the 2000s, five decades that witnessed the fracturing of liberalism and the rise of the conservative right. The award-winning historian Robert O. Self is the first to argue that the separate threads of that realignment—from civil rights to womens rights, from the antiwar movement to Nixons “silent majority,” from the abortion wars to gay marriage, from the welfare state to neoliberal economic policies—all ran through the politicized American family.

Based on an astonishing range of sources, All in the Family rethinks an entire era. Self opens his narrative with the Great Society and its assumption of a white, patriotic, heterosexual man at the head of each family. Soon enough, civil rights activists, feminists, and gay rights activists, animated by broader visions of citizenship, began to fight for equal rights, protections, and opportunities. Led by Pauli Murray, Gloria Steinem, Harvey Milk, and Shirley Chisholm, among many others, they achieved lasting successes, including Roe v. Wade, antidiscrimination protections in the workplace, and a more inclusive idea of the American family.

Yet the establishment of new rights and the visibility of alternative families provoked, beginning in the 1970s, a furious conservative backlash. Politicians and activists on the right, most notably George Wallace, Phyllis Schlafly, Anita Bryant, and Jerry Falwell, built a political movement based on the perceived moral threat to the traditional family. Self writes that “family values” conservatives in fact “paved the way” for fiscal conservatives, who shared a belief in liberalisms invasiveness but lacked a populist message. Reagans presidency united the two constituencies, which remain, even in these tumultuous times, the base of the Republican Party. All in the Family, an erudite, passionate, and persuasive explanation of our current political situation and how we arrived in it, will allow us to think anew about the last fifty years of American politics.

Review:

"In this extensively researched volume, Self, Brown associate professor of history (American Babylon), attempts to make sense of the shift in American politics and social movements from 1964 through 2004, from the 'center-left social welfare polity' of the mid-20th century to the 'center-right free market system' of the 21st century. There's a heavy focus on gender and sexuality, covering everything from the women's movement to abortion and antifeminism. He gives a great deal of attention to the in-your-face roles played by the various gay and lesbian factions as they came out of the closet and moved into politics and social change. At the core of each avenue of discussion is the exploration of how four decades of radical change affected the very concept of liberalism while allowing conservatives to gain strength. Any one of the topics Self covers would be enough to fill volumes on its own, and he may have overreached in trying to tie it all together. The material is as fascinating as the presentation is dry, and this compendium may overwhelm the casual reader. 8 pages of b&w illus. (Sept.)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

“Provocative . . . Tells us a great deal about recent political history.” —The Wall Street Journal

In the 1960s, Lyndon Johnsons Great Society and War on Poverty promised an array of federal programs to assist working-class families. In the 1980s, Ronald Reagan declared the GOP the party of “family values” and promised to keep government out of Americans lives. Again and again, historians have sought to explain the nations profound political realignment from the 1960s to the early 2000s, five decades that witnessed the fracturing of liberalism and the rise of the conservative right. The award-winning historian Robert O. Self is the first to argue that the separate threads of that realignment—from civil rights to womens rights, from the antiwar movement to Nixons “silent majority,” from the abortion wars to gay marriage, from the welfare state to neoliberal economic policies—all ran through the politicized American family.

     All in the Family is a revelatory narrative about the activism on the left and the right that reshaped postwar America. With authority and nuance, Self shows that when we disagree about gender, sex, and family, we are really disagreeing about equality, power, and money—in essence, about the nature and role of government itself. As Mark Schmitt put it in his glowing review in The Washington Monthly, Self, by demonstrating that economic and social issues are one in the same, has rewritten recent American political history “from its most basic assumptions.”

Synopsis:

In the 1960s President Lyndon Johnsons Great Society and War on Poverty legislation promised an array of federal programs to assist millions of American families. In the 1980s President Ronald Reagan declared Republicans the party of traditional family values and promised to keep the federal government out of American lives. Again and again, historians have sought to explain the nations profound political realignment from the 1960s to the 2000s, four decades that witnessed the fracturing of liberalism and the rise of the conservative right.

 

The award-winning historian Robert O. Self is the first to recognize that the many separate threads of that realignment—from civil rights to womens rights, from the antiwar movement to the silent majority, from the abortion wars to gay marriage, from health care to welfare reform—all ran through the politicized modern American family.

 

All in the Family is a synthetic history of the last half of the American century. Drawing on an astonishing breadth of sources, Self shows how movements on the liberal left that demanded equal rights and greater government protection inadvertently elicited conservative activism that sought to restore the nuclear family under the rubric of “family values,” a political idea that is as influential now as it has ever been.

 

All in the Family is an urgent, ambitious, and important work that will help us think anew about the legacy of the 1960s.

About the Author

Robert O. Self is a professor of history at Brown University. His first book, American Babylon: Race and the Struggle for Postwar Oakland, won numerous awards, including the James A. Rawley Prize from the Organization of American Historians. He lives in Providence, Rhode Island.

Table of Contents

Prologue

PART 1: THIS IS A MANS WORLD, 1964-1973

1. Are You Man Enough? Sixties Breadwinner Liberalism

2. Last Man to Die: Vietnam and the Citizen Soldier

3. Homosexual Tendencies: Gay Men and Sexual Citizenship

PART 2: THE SUBJECTION OF WOMEN, 1964-1976

4. The Working Mother Has No Wife: The Dilemmas of Market and Motherhood

5. Bodies on Trial: The Politics of Reproduction

6. American Sappho: The Lesbian Political Imagination

PART 3: THE PERMISSIVE SOCIETY, 1968-1980

7. Wild Before the Fire: The Sexual Politics of an Erotic Revolution

8. A Process of Coming Out: From Liberation to Gay Politics

9. No Steelworkers and No Plumbers: Liberalism in Trouble 10. A Strange but Righ teous Power: The Breadwinner Conservatism of Forgotten Americans

PART 4: FAMILY VALUES, 1973-2011

11. The Price of Liberty: Antifeminism and the Crisis of the Family

12. Go Ye into All the World: God, Family, and Country in the Fourth Great Awakening

13. Ancient Roots: The Reagan Revolutions Gender and Sexual Politics

Epilogue: Neoliberalism and the Making of the Culture War

Abbreviations Used in the Notes

Notes

Acknowledgments

Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9780809095025
Subtitle:
The Realignment of American Democracy Since the 1960s
Author:
Self, Robert O
Author:
Self, Robert O.
Publisher:
Hill and Wang
Subject:
United States - 20th Century
Subject:
Political Ideologies - Conservatism & Liberalism
Subject:
US History - 20th Century
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20130917
Binding:
Electronic book text in proprietary or open standard format
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Illustrations/Notes/Index
Pages:
528
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

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Related Subjects

Featured Titles » History and Social Science
History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » Politics » United States » Politics
History and Social Science » US History » 20th Century » General

All in the Family: The Realignment of American Democracy Since the 1960s Used Hardcover
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Product details 528 pages Hill & Wang - English 9780809095025 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "In this extensively researched volume, Self, Brown associate professor of history (American Babylon), attempts to make sense of the shift in American politics and social movements from 1964 through 2004, from the 'center-left social welfare polity' of the mid-20th century to the 'center-right free market system' of the 21st century. There's a heavy focus on gender and sexuality, covering everything from the women's movement to abortion and antifeminism. He gives a great deal of attention to the in-your-face roles played by the various gay and lesbian factions as they came out of the closet and moved into politics and social change. At the core of each avenue of discussion is the exploration of how four decades of radical change affected the very concept of liberalism while allowing conservatives to gain strength. Any one of the topics Self covers would be enough to fill volumes on its own, and he may have overreached in trying to tie it all together. The material is as fascinating as the presentation is dry, and this compendium may overwhelm the casual reader. 8 pages of b&w illus. (Sept.)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by ,
“Provocative . . . Tells us a great deal about recent political history.” —The Wall Street Journal

In the 1960s, Lyndon Johnsons Great Society and War on Poverty promised an array of federal programs to assist working-class families. In the 1980s, Ronald Reagan declared the GOP the party of “family values” and promised to keep government out of Americans lives. Again and again, historians have sought to explain the nations profound political realignment from the 1960s to the early 2000s, five decades that witnessed the fracturing of liberalism and the rise of the conservative right. The award-winning historian Robert O. Self is the first to argue that the separate threads of that realignment—from civil rights to womens rights, from the antiwar movement to Nixons “silent majority,” from the abortion wars to gay marriage, from the welfare state to neoliberal economic policies—all ran through the politicized American family.

     All in the Family is a revelatory narrative about the activism on the left and the right that reshaped postwar America. With authority and nuance, Self shows that when we disagree about gender, sex, and family, we are really disagreeing about equality, power, and money—in essence, about the nature and role of government itself. As Mark Schmitt put it in his glowing review in The Washington Monthly, Self, by demonstrating that economic and social issues are one in the same, has rewritten recent American political history “from its most basic assumptions.”

"Synopsis" by ,

In the 1960s President Lyndon Johnsons Great Society and War on Poverty legislation promised an array of federal programs to assist millions of American families. In the 1980s President Ronald Reagan declared Republicans the party of traditional family values and promised to keep the federal government out of American lives. Again and again, historians have sought to explain the nations profound political realignment from the 1960s to the 2000s, four decades that witnessed the fracturing of liberalism and the rise of the conservative right.

 

The award-winning historian Robert O. Self is the first to recognize that the many separate threads of that realignment—from civil rights to womens rights, from the antiwar movement to the silent majority, from the abortion wars to gay marriage, from health care to welfare reform—all ran through the politicized modern American family.

 

All in the Family is a synthetic history of the last half of the American century. Drawing on an astonishing breadth of sources, Self shows how movements on the liberal left that demanded equal rights and greater government protection inadvertently elicited conservative activism that sought to restore the nuclear family under the rubric of “family values,” a political idea that is as influential now as it has ever been.

 

All in the Family is an urgent, ambitious, and important work that will help us think anew about the legacy of the 1960s.

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