Master your Minecraft
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN a $100 Credit

Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news
for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

Tour our stores


    Recently Viewed clear list


    Original Essays | November 7, 2014

    Karelia Stetz-Waters: IMG The Hot Sex Tip Cosmo Won't Tell You



    Cosmopolitan Magazine recently released an article titled "28 Mind-Blowing Lesbian Sex Positions." Where was this vital information when I was a... Continue »

    spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$8.95
List price: $12.95
Used Hardcover
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Beaverton Children's Middle Readers- General
5 Burnside Children's Middle Readers- General
2 Hawthorne Children's Middle Readers- General

The Strange Case of Origami Yoda

by

The Strange Case of Origami Yoda Cover

ISBN13: 9780810984257
ISBN10: 0810984253
Condition: Standard
All Product Details

 

Staff Pick

Can you trust advice from a paper finger puppet? Tommy is going to find out. Read this book! You must!
Recommended by Kathy H, Powell's Books at PDX

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

andquot;I never thought science could be funny . . . until I read Frank Einstein. It will have kids laughing.andquot;

andmdash;Jeff Kinney, Diary of a Wimpy Kid

and#160;

andldquo;Dear Frank Einstein,

Please invent time machine. Send your books back in time to me in 1978.

Also a levitating skateboard.

Tommyandrdquo;

andmdash;Tom Angleberger, The Strange Case of Origami Yoda

Frank Einstein loves figuring out how the world works by creating household contraptions that are part science, part imagination, and definitely unusual. After an uneventful experiment in his garage-lab, a lightning storm and flash of electricity bring Frankandrsquo;s inventionsandmdash;the robots Klink and Klankandmdash;to life! Not exactly the ideal lab partners, the wisecracking Klink and the overly expressive Klank nonetheless help Frank attempt to perfect his Antimatter Motor . . . until Frankandrsquo;s archnemesis, T. Edison, steals Klink and Klank for his evil doomsday plan! Using real science, Jon Scieszka has created a unique world of adventure and science fictionandmdash;an irresistible chemical reaction for middle-grade readers.

STARRED REVIEW

andquot;In the final analysis, this buoyant, tongue-in-cheek celebration of the impulse to andlsquo;keep asking questions and finding your own answersandrsquo; fires on all cylinders.andquot;

--Booklist, starred review

andquot;Scieszka mixes science and silliness again to great effect.andquot;

andmdash;Kirkus Reviews

andquot;In refusing to take itself too seriously, it proves that science can be as fun as it is important and useful.andquot;

andmdash;Publishers Weekly

andquot;With humor, straightforward writing, tons of illustrations, and a touch of action at the end, this book is accessible and easy to read, making it an appealing choice for reluctant readers. A solid start to the series.andquot;

--School Library Journal

andquot;Kids will love Frank Einstein because even though he is a new character he will be instantly recognizable to the readers...Jon Scieszka is one of the best writers around, and I canand#39;t wait to see what he does with these fun and exciting characters.andquot;

andmdash;Eoin Colfer, Artemis Fowl

andquot;Jon Scieszkaand#39;s new series has the winning ingredients that link his clever brilliance in story telling with his knowledge of real science, while at the same time the content combination of fiction and non fiction appeals to the full range of the market.andquot;

andmdash;Jack Gantos, Dead End in Norvelt

Review:

"'Is Origami Yoda real?' is the question that plagues sixth-grader Tommy and drives the plot of this snappy debut. From one perspective, Origami Yoda is a finger puppet that offers cryptic but oddly sage advice to Tommy and his classmates. From another, he is simply the 'green paperwad' animated by Tommy's misfit friend, Dwight, who 'wear[s] shorts with his socks pulled up above his knees' and stares into space 'like a hypnotized chicken.' Compiling a series of funny, first-person accounts of Yoda's wisdom from his friends, Tommy hopes to solve this mystery to determine whether to trust Yoda's advice about asking a certain girl to dance. Angleberger peppers his chapters with spot-on boy banter, humorously crude Captain Underpants — style drawings, and wisecrack asides that comically address the social land mines of middle school. Tommy confronts the ethical dilemma of standing up for the weird kid and the angst of school dances: 'My hands were shaking and my stomach was excited like the time my dad accidentally drove into a fire hydrant.' But with enigmatic counsel like 'Cheetos for everyone you must buy,' Yoda keeps the mystery alive. Ages 8 — 12." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Synopsis:

Welcome to Pandupur! With its bustling marketplace and honking traffic, posh colonies and shanty towns, railway station and looming dam, forests and playgrounds, Pandupur is teeming with life, much like the river Dhun that flows alongside it.

In Growing Up in Pandupur, sisters Adithi and Chatura Rao weave a web of stories of life lessons, laughter and tears, insecurities, small unkindnesses, and surprising friendship in this fictional town. The book builds a map of Pandupur through the lives of its youngest residents. Characters in the thirteen stories are faced with bullying, gender stereotyping, poverty, and privilege and, in the process of tackling these issues, they learn valuable lessons about the human heart and about growing up. Growing Up in Pandupur is a book that will resonate in the hearts and minds of childrenand#151;and the young at heartand#151;everywhere.

Synopsis:

andldquo;A double helping of fun and mischief!andrdquo;

andmdash;Jeff kinney, author of the Diary of a Wimpy Kid series

and#160;

andldquo;Hilarious.andrdquo;

andmdash;Dav Pilkey, author of the Captain Underpants series

and#160;

Miles Murphy is not happy to be moving to Yawnee Valley, a sleepy town thatandrsquo;s famous for one thing and one thing only: cows. In his old school, everyone knew him as the townandrsquo;s best prankster, but Miles quickly discovers that Yawnee Valley already has a prankster, and a great one. If Miles is going to take the title from this mystery kid, he is going to have to raise his game.

and#160;

Itandrsquo;s prankster against prankster in an epic war of trickery, until the two finally decide to join forces and pull off the biggest prank ever seen: a prank so huge that it would make the members of the International Order of Disorder proud.

and#160;

In The Terrible Two, bestselling authors and friends Mac Barnett and Jory John have created a series that has its roots in classic middle-grade literature yet feels fresh and new at the same time.

and#160;

andldquo;The pranks, the brotherhood, the art, the heart! Whatandrsquo;s not to love about the Terrible Two?andrdquo;

andmdash;Sara Pennypacker, author of the Clementine series

and#160;

andldquo;You donandrsquo;t have to be a cow, like cows, or even know a cow to love the Terrible Two.andrdquo;

andmdash;Dave Eggers

and#160;

andldquo;This book is terrible! Terribly funny, terribly full of pranks, and terribly wonderful.andrdquo;

andmdash;Jon Scieszka, author of The Stinky Cheese Man and the Frank Einstein series

and#160;

andldquo;The Terrible Two are my kind of kids. And whatandrsquo;s more, theyandrsquo;re kidsandrsquo; kind of kids.andrdquo;

andmdash;Annie Barrows, author of the Ivy and Bean series

Video

About the Author

Applying for a job as a newspaper artist, Tom Angleberger was mistakenly assigned to cover local government meetings. Fifteen years and countless town council meetings later, he is still writing instead of drawing, currently as a columnist for the Roanoke Times in Roanoke, Virginia. He began work on his first book while in middle school. Tom is married to author-illustrator Cece Bell. They live in Christianburg, Virginia.

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 2 comments:

Dar, February 1, 2013 (view all comments by Dar)
My 7 yr old daughter loved this book and just finished the second in the series. A bonus, she got to fold Origami Yoda. She was tickled with the instructions for origami.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(2 of 4 readers found this comment helpful)
sherrybaby, August 31, 2012 (view all comments by sherrybaby)
Take me to your reader!
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(1 of 2 readers found this comment helpful)
View all 2 comments

Product Details

ISBN:
9780810984257
Author:
Angleberger, Tom
Publisher:
Harry N. Abrams
Author:
Angleb
Author:
Cornell, Kevin
Author:
erger, Tom
Author:
Biggs, Brian
Author:
John, Jory
Author:
Rao, Chatura
Author:
Scieszka, Jon
Author:
Barnett, Mac
Author:
Rao, Adithi
Author:
Solomons, David
Subject:
General
Subject:
Schools
Subject:
Middle schools
Subject:
General Juvenile Fiction
Subject:
Humorous Stories
Subject:
Children s-General
Subject:
Children s humor
Subject:
Science & Technology
Subject:
People & Places - Other
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Cloth
Series:
Origami Yoda
Publication Date:
20100301
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
from 2 up to 6
Language:
English
Illustrations:
13 halftones, 1 map
Pages:
160
Dimensions:
8 x 6 in
Age Level:
08-12

Other books you might like

  1. The Boy Who Climbed Into the Moon New Mass Market $14.00
  2. The Popularity Papers: Research for... Used Hardcover $9.50
  3. Keeper Used Trade Paper $5.50
  4. 13th Reality #01: The Journal of... Used Trade Paper $5.50
  5. The Talent Show New Trade Paper $5.99
  6. A Sick Day for Amos McGee
    New Hardcover $16.99

Related Subjects


Children's » Awards » Oregon Reader's Choice Award
Children's » Featured Titles
Children's » General
Children's » Humor
Children's » Middle Readers » General
Children's » Oregon Battle of the Books
Children's » Sale Books
Children's » Staff Picks
Featured Titles » Bestsellers

The Strange Case of Origami Yoda Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$8.95 In Stock
Product details 160 pages Amulet Books - English 9780810984257 Reviews:
"Staff Pick" by ,

Can you trust advice from a paper finger puppet? Tommy is going to find out. Read this book! You must!

"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "'Is Origami Yoda real?' is the question that plagues sixth-grader Tommy and drives the plot of this snappy debut. From one perspective, Origami Yoda is a finger puppet that offers cryptic but oddly sage advice to Tommy and his classmates. From another, he is simply the 'green paperwad' animated by Tommy's misfit friend, Dwight, who 'wear[s] shorts with his socks pulled up above his knees' and stares into space 'like a hypnotized chicken.' Compiling a series of funny, first-person accounts of Yoda's wisdom from his friends, Tommy hopes to solve this mystery to determine whether to trust Yoda's advice about asking a certain girl to dance. Angleberger peppers his chapters with spot-on boy banter, humorously crude Captain Underpants — style drawings, and wisecrack asides that comically address the social land mines of middle school. Tommy confronts the ethical dilemma of standing up for the weird kid and the angst of school dances: 'My hands were shaking and my stomach was excited like the time my dad accidentally drove into a fire hydrant.' But with enigmatic counsel like 'Cheetos for everyone you must buy,' Yoda keeps the mystery alive. Ages 8 — 12." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by ,
Welcome to Pandupur! With its bustling marketplace and honking traffic, posh colonies and shanty towns, railway station and looming dam, forests and playgrounds, Pandupur is teeming with life, much like the river Dhun that flows alongside it.

In Growing Up in Pandupur, sisters Adithi and Chatura Rao weave a web of stories of life lessons, laughter and tears, insecurities, small unkindnesses, and surprising friendship in this fictional town. The book builds a map of Pandupur through the lives of its youngest residents. Characters in the thirteen stories are faced with bullying, gender stereotyping, poverty, and privilege and, in the process of tackling these issues, they learn valuable lessons about the human heart and about growing up. Growing Up in Pandupur is a book that will resonate in the hearts and minds of childrenand#151;and the young at heartand#151;everywhere.

"Synopsis" by ,
andldquo;A double helping of fun and mischief!andrdquo;

andmdash;Jeff kinney, author of the Diary of a Wimpy Kid series

and#160;

andldquo;Hilarious.andrdquo;

andmdash;Dav Pilkey, author of the Captain Underpants series

and#160;

Miles Murphy is not happy to be moving to Yawnee Valley, a sleepy town thatandrsquo;s famous for one thing and one thing only: cows. In his old school, everyone knew him as the townandrsquo;s best prankster, but Miles quickly discovers that Yawnee Valley already has a prankster, and a great one. If Miles is going to take the title from this mystery kid, he is going to have to raise his game.

and#160;

Itandrsquo;s prankster against prankster in an epic war of trickery, until the two finally decide to join forces and pull off the biggest prank ever seen: a prank so huge that it would make the members of the International Order of Disorder proud.

and#160;

In The Terrible Two, bestselling authors and friends Mac Barnett and Jory John have created a series that has its roots in classic middle-grade literature yet feels fresh and new at the same time.

and#160;

andldquo;The pranks, the brotherhood, the art, the heart! Whatandrsquo;s not to love about the Terrible Two?andrdquo;

andmdash;Sara Pennypacker, author of the Clementine series

and#160;

andldquo;You donandrsquo;t have to be a cow, like cows, or even know a cow to love the Terrible Two.andrdquo;

andmdash;Dave Eggers

and#160;

andldquo;This book is terrible! Terribly funny, terribly full of pranks, and terribly wonderful.andrdquo;

andmdash;Jon Scieszka, author of The Stinky Cheese Man and the Frank Einstein series

and#160;

andldquo;The Terrible Two are my kind of kids. And whatandrsquo;s more, theyandrsquo;re kidsandrsquo; kind of kids.andrdquo;

andmdash;Annie Barrows, author of the Ivy and Bean series

spacer
spacer
  • back to top

FOLLOW US ON...

     
Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.