Murakami Sale
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


The Powell's Playlist | August 8, 2014

Peter Mendelsund: IMG The Powell's Playlist: Water Music by Peter Mendelsund



We "see" when we read, and we "see" when we listen. There are many ways in which music can create the cross-sensory experience of this seeing...... Continue »
  1. $11.87 Sale Trade Paper add to wish list

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$15.95
New Trade Paper
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
2 Hawthorne Literature- A to Z
5 Local Warehouse Literature- A to Z
16 Remote Warehouse Literature- A to Z

Exercises in Style

by

Exercises in Style Cover

 

Staff Pick

Raymond Queneau's brilliant 1947 classic could have just as easily been titled Achievements of Ingenuity. Written more than a decade before he would cofound the "Workshop of Potential Literature" (Oulipo), Exercises in Style is one of the preeminent examples (and executions) of constrained writing. Beginning with a short account of an entirely inconsequential event, Queneau tells the same episode 99 times, but each entry is written using whatever stylistic limitation he's opted to incorporate. His chosen constraints range from the mathematical ("Permutations by Groups of 2, 3, 4 and 5 Letters" and "Permutations by Groups of 5, 6, 7 and 8 Letters") to the phonological ("Apocope," "Syncope," and "Apheresis") to wordplay ("Anagrams," "Spoonerisms," "Dog Latin," and "Onomatopoeia") to the poetic ("Synchysis," "Haiku," "Alexandrines," "Ode," "Sonnet," and "Free Verse") to the scientific ("Botanical," "Zoological," "Gastronomical," and "Medical"), as well as many others.

That Queneau was able to translate his brief tale into so many different stylistic forms, yet still retain and convey the same story, is rather remarkable. Exercises in Style is but one of so many examples in which the exceptional capacity of the human intellect to make sense of disparate configurations that share a commonality is made manifest. The Frenchman's work is a triumph of form over content, and makes for a dazzling display of the inherent power and potential of language, style, and meaning.

To mark the 65th anniversary of the original publication of Exercises in Style, New Directions has released this new edition of Queneau's landmark work, complete with nearly 30 variant "exercises," many of which have never before been published. Additionally, 10 different authors (perhaps most notably Enrique Vila-Matas and fellow-Oulipian Harry Mathews) each contributed "Exercises in Homage to Raymond Queneau."

People have tried to see it as an attempt to demolish literature — that was not at all my intention. In any case my intention was merely to produce some exercises; the finished product may possibly act as a kind of rust-remover to literature, help to rid it of some of its scabs. If I have been able to contribute a little to this, then I am very proud, especially if I have done it without boring the reader too much.

Recommended by Jeremy, Powells.com

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

On a crowded bus at midday, Raymond Queneau observes one man accusing another of jostling him deliberately. When a seat is vacated, the first man appropriates it. Later, in another part of town, Queneau sees the man being advised by a friend to sew a new button on his overcoat.

Exercises in Style — Queneau’s experimental masterpiece and a hallmark book of the Oulipo literary group — retells this unexceptional tale ninety-nine times, employing the sonnet and the alexandrine, onomatopoeia and Cockney. An “Abusive” chapter heartily deplores the events; “Opera English” lends them grandeur. Queneau once said that of all his books, this was the one he most wished to see translated. He offered Barbara Wright his “heartiest congratulations,” adding: “I have always thought that nothing is untranslatable.Here is new proof.”

To celebrate the 65th anniversary of the 1947 French publication of Exercises de Style, New Directions has asked several writers to contribute new exercises as a tribute. Tantalizing examples include Jonathan Lethem’s “Cyberpunk,” Harry Mathew’s “Phonetic Eros,” and Frederic Tuten’s “Beatnik” exercises. This edition also retains Barbara Wright’s original introduction and reminiscence of working on this book — a translation that in 2008 was ranked first on the Author’s Society’s list of “The 50 Outstanding Translations of the Last 50 Years.”

Synopsis:

A new edition of a French modernist classic - a Parisian scene told ninety-nine different ways - with new material written in homage by the likes of Jonathan Lethem, Rivka Galchen, and many more.

About the Author

Raymond Queneau (1903-1976) is acknowledged as one of the most influential of modern French writers, having helped determine the shape of twentieth-century French literature, especially in his role with the Oulipo, a group of authors that includes Italo Calvino, Georges Perec, and Harry Mathews, among others.Barbara Wright has translated several Raymond Queneau novels; indeed, as John Updike wrote in The New Yorker, she "has waltzed around the floor with the Master so many times by now that she follows his quirky French as if the steps were in English." She has also translated works by Alain Robbe-Grillet, Robert Pinget, Nathalie Sarraute, and Marguerite Duras. She lives in London.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780811220354
Author:
Queneau, Raymond
Publisher:
New Directions Publishing Corporation
Author:
Wright, Barbara
Subject:
General Fiction
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Publication Date:
20130131
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
from 13 up to 17
Language:
English
Pages:
220
Dimensions:
8 x 5 in

Other books you might like

  1. Pterror Over Paris/The Eiffel Tower... Used Hardcover $17.50
  2. West Coast Blues Used Hardcover $10.50

Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
History and Social Science » Linguistics » General

Exercises in Style New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$15.95 In Stock
Product details 220 pages New Directions Publishing Corporation - English 9780811220354 Reviews:
"Staff Pick" by ,

Raymond Queneau's brilliant 1947 classic could have just as easily been titled Achievements of Ingenuity. Written more than a decade before he would cofound the "Workshop of Potential Literature" (Oulipo), Exercises in Style is one of the preeminent examples (and executions) of constrained writing. Beginning with a short account of an entirely inconsequential event, Queneau tells the same episode 99 times, but each entry is written using whatever stylistic limitation he's opted to incorporate. His chosen constraints range from the mathematical ("Permutations by Groups of 2, 3, 4 and 5 Letters" and "Permutations by Groups of 5, 6, 7 and 8 Letters") to the phonological ("Apocope," "Syncope," and "Apheresis") to wordplay ("Anagrams," "Spoonerisms," "Dog Latin," and "Onomatopoeia") to the poetic ("Synchysis," "Haiku," "Alexandrines," "Ode," "Sonnet," and "Free Verse") to the scientific ("Botanical," "Zoological," "Gastronomical," and "Medical"), as well as many others.

That Queneau was able to translate his brief tale into so many different stylistic forms, yet still retain and convey the same story, is rather remarkable. Exercises in Style is but one of so many examples in which the exceptional capacity of the human intellect to make sense of disparate configurations that share a commonality is made manifest. The Frenchman's work is a triumph of form over content, and makes for a dazzling display of the inherent power and potential of language, style, and meaning.

To mark the 65th anniversary of the original publication of Exercises in Style, New Directions has released this new edition of Queneau's landmark work, complete with nearly 30 variant "exercises," many of which have never before been published. Additionally, 10 different authors (perhaps most notably Enrique Vila-Matas and fellow-Oulipian Harry Mathews) each contributed "Exercises in Homage to Raymond Queneau."

People have tried to see it as an attempt to demolish literature — that was not at all my intention. In any case my intention was merely to produce some exercises; the finished product may possibly act as a kind of rust-remover to literature, help to rid it of some of its scabs. If I have been able to contribute a little to this, then I am very proud, especially if I have done it without boring the reader too much.

"Synopsis" by , A new edition of a French modernist classic - a Parisian scene told ninety-nine different ways - with new material written in homage by the likes of Jonathan Lethem, Rivka Galchen, and many more.
spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.