25 Books to Read Before You Die
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Original Essays | August 20, 2014

Julie Schumacher: IMG Dear Professor Fitger



Saint Paul, August 2014 Dear Professor Fitger, I've been asked to say a few words about you for Powells.com. Having dreamed you up with a ball-point... Continue »
  1. $16.07 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

    Dear Committee Members

    Julie Schumacher 9780385538138

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$30.00
Used Hardcover
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Burnside Politics- Fascism and Far Right

More copies of this ISBN

This title in other editions

Hitler's Priestess: Savitri Devi, the Hindu-Aryan Myth, and Neo-Nazism

by

Hitler's Priestess: Savitri Devi, the Hindu-Aryan Myth, and Neo-Nazism Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In this window onto the roots and evolution of international neo-Nazism, Nicholas Goodrick-Clarke reveals the powerful impact of one of fascism's most creative minds.

Savitri Devi's influence on neo-Nazism and other hybrid strains of mystical fascism has been continuos since the mid-1960s. A Frenchwoman of Greek-English birth, Devi became an admirer of German National Socialism in the late 1920s. Deeply impressed by its racial heritage and caste-system, she emigrated to India, where she developed her racial ideology, in the early 1930s. Her works have been reissued and distributed through various neo-Nazi networks and she has been lionized as a foremother of Nazi ideology. Her appeal to neo-Nazi sects lies in the very eccentricity of her thought - combining Aryan supremacism and anti-Semitism with Hinduism, social Darwinisn, animal rights, and a fundamentally biocentric view of life - and has resulted in curious, yet potent alliances in radical ideology.

As one of the earliest Holocaust deniers and the first to suggest that Adolf Hitler was an avatar-- a god come to earth in human form to restore the world to a golden age - Devi became a fixture in the shadowy neo-Nazi world. In Hitler's Priestess, Nicholas Goodrick-Clarke examines how someone with so little tangible connection to Nazi Germany became such a powerful advocate of Hitler's misanthropy.

Hitler's Priestess illuminates the life of a woman who achieved the status of a prophetess for her penchant for redirecting authentic religious energies in the service of regenerate fascism.

Book News Annotation:

A biography of Savitri Devi (1905-1982), the unusual woman who believed Hitler was an avatar and attempted to combine Hinduism and anti-Semitism. The author discusses Devi's denial of the Holocaust, her appeal to neo-Nazis, and the relationship of her beliefs to animal rights, social Darwinism, and even Deep Ecology. The focus of the book is on how someone with so little tangible connection to Nazi Germany became such a powerful advocate of Hitler's misanthropy.
Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

A biography of Savitri Devi (1905-1982), the unusual woman who believed Hitler was an avatar and attempted to combine Hinduism and anti-Semitism. The author discusses Devi's denial of the Holocaust, her appeal to neo-Nazis, and the relationship of her beliefs to animal rights, social Darwinism, and

Synopsis:

Henry Jenkins at Authors@Google (video)

Henry Jenkins“s pioneering work in the early 1990s promoted the idea that fans are among the most active, creative, critically engaged, and socially connected consumers of popular culture and that they represent the vanguard of a new relationship with mass media. Though marginal and largely invisible to the general public at the time, today, media producers and advertisers, not to mention researchers and fans, take for granted the idea that the success of a media franchise depends on fan investments and participation.

Bringing together the highlights of a decade and a half of groundbreaking research into the cultural life of media consumers, Fans, Bloggers, and Gamers takes readers from Jenkins's progressive early work defending fan culture against those who would marginalize or stigmatize it, through to his more recent work, combating moral panic and defending Goths and gamers in the wake of the Columbine shootings. Starting with an interview on the current state of fan studies, this volume maps the core theoretical and methodological issues in Fan Studies. It goes on to chart the growth of participatory culture on the web, take up blogging as perhaps the most powerful illustration of how consumer participation impacts mainstream media, and debate the public policy implications surrounding participation and intellectual property.

Synopsis:

In this window onto the roots and evolution of international neo-Nazism, Nicholas Goodrick-Clarke reveals the powerful impact of one of fascism's most creative minds.

Savitri Devi's influence on neo-Nazism and other hybrid strains of mystical fascism has been continuos since the mid-1960s. A Frenchwoman of Greek-English birth, Devi became an admirer of German National Socialism in the late 1920s. Deeply impressed by its racial heritage and caste-system, she emigrated to India, where she developed her racial ideology, in the early 1930s. Her works have been reissued and distributed through various neo-Nazi networks and she has been lionized as a foremother of Nazi ideology. Her appeal to neo-Nazi sects lies in the very eccentricity of her thought - combining Aryan supremacism and anti-Semitism with Hinduism, social Darwinisn, animal rights, and a fundamentally biocentric view of life - and has resulted in curious, yet potent alliances in radical ideology.

As one of the earliest Holocaust deniers and the first to suggest that Adolf Hitler was an avatar-- a god come to earth in human form to restore the world to a golden age - Devi became a fixture in the shadowy neo-Nazi world. In Hitler's Priestess, Nicholas Goodrick-Clarke examines how someone with so little tangible connection to Nazi Germany became such a powerful advocate of Hitler's misanthropy.

Hitler's Priestess illuminates the life of a woman who achieved the status of a prophetess for her penchant for redirecting authentic religious energies in the service of regenerate fascism.

About the Author

Nicholas Goodrick-Clarke is the author of The Occult Roots of Nazism: Secret Aryan Cults and Their Influence on Nazi Ideology, also available from New York University Press.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780814731109
Author:
Goodrick-Clarke, Nicholas
Publisher:
New York University Press
Author:
Jenkins, Henry
Author:
Goodrick-Clarke, Nicholas
Location:
New York :
Subject:
General
Subject:
Women's Studies
Subject:
Historical - U.S.
Subject:
History & Theory - Radical Thought
Subject:
Fascism
Subject:
Neo-nazism
Subject:
Savitri Devi
Subject:
History & Theory
Subject:
National socialism
Subject:
FASCISM AND NAZISM
Subject:
Political
Subject:
World History-General
Subject:
Mass media
Copyright:
Publication Date:
19980531
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
278
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

Other books you might like

  1. Covering Islam: How the Media and... Used Trade Paper $7.95
  2. Julius Caesar: Man, Soldier, and... Used Trade Paper $5.95
  3. This Rough Game: Fascism and... Used Hardcover $21.00
  4. The Craft of the Japanese Sword Used Hardcover $30.00
  5. Language and Travel Guide to Ukraine Used Trade Paper $10.95
  6. Object Databases: The Essentials Used Trade Paper $1.00

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Politics » Fascism and Far Right
History and Social Science » World History » General

Hitler's Priestess: Savitri Devi, the Hindu-Aryan Myth, and Neo-Nazism Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$30.00 In Stock
Product details 278 pages New York University Press - English 9780814731109 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , A biography of Savitri Devi (1905-1982), the unusual woman who believed Hitler was an avatar and attempted to combine Hinduism and anti-Semitism. The author discusses Devi's denial of the Holocaust, her appeal to neo-Nazis, and the relationship of her beliefs to animal rights, social Darwinism, and
"Synopsis" by , Henry Jenkins at Authors@Google (video)

Henry Jenkins“s pioneering work in the early 1990s promoted the idea that fans are among the most active, creative, critically engaged, and socially connected consumers of popular culture and that they represent the vanguard of a new relationship with mass media. Though marginal and largely invisible to the general public at the time, today, media producers and advertisers, not to mention researchers and fans, take for granted the idea that the success of a media franchise depends on fan investments and participation.

Bringing together the highlights of a decade and a half of groundbreaking research into the cultural life of media consumers, Fans, Bloggers, and Gamers takes readers from Jenkins's progressive early work defending fan culture against those who would marginalize or stigmatize it, through to his more recent work, combating moral panic and defending Goths and gamers in the wake of the Columbine shootings. Starting with an interview on the current state of fan studies, this volume maps the core theoretical and methodological issues in Fan Studies. It goes on to chart the growth of participatory culture on the web, take up blogging as perhaps the most powerful illustration of how consumer participation impacts mainstream media, and debate the public policy implications surrounding participation and intellectual property.

"Synopsis" by , In this window onto the roots and evolution of international neo-Nazism, Nicholas Goodrick-Clarke reveals the powerful impact of one of fascism's most creative minds.

Savitri Devi's influence on neo-Nazism and other hybrid strains of mystical fascism has been continuos since the mid-1960s. A Frenchwoman of Greek-English birth, Devi became an admirer of German National Socialism in the late 1920s. Deeply impressed by its racial heritage and caste-system, she emigrated to India, where she developed her racial ideology, in the early 1930s. Her works have been reissued and distributed through various neo-Nazi networks and she has been lionized as a foremother of Nazi ideology. Her appeal to neo-Nazi sects lies in the very eccentricity of her thought - combining Aryan supremacism and anti-Semitism with Hinduism, social Darwinisn, animal rights, and a fundamentally biocentric view of life - and has resulted in curious, yet potent alliances in radical ideology.

As one of the earliest Holocaust deniers and the first to suggest that Adolf Hitler was an avatar-- a god come to earth in human form to restore the world to a golden age - Devi became a fixture in the shadowy neo-Nazi world. In Hitler's Priestess, Nicholas Goodrick-Clarke examines how someone with so little tangible connection to Nazi Germany became such a powerful advocate of Hitler's misanthropy.

Hitler's Priestess illuminates the life of a woman who achieved the status of a prophetess for her penchant for redirecting authentic religious energies in the service of regenerate fascism.

spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.