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Cybercrime: Digital Cops in a Networked Environment (Ex Machina: Law, Technology, and Society)

by

Cybercrime: Digital Cops in a Networked Environment (Ex Machina: Law, Technology, and Society) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

From the 1967 live satellite program "Our World" to MTV music videos in Indonesia, from French television in Senegal to the global syndication of African American sitcoms, and from representations of terrorism on German television to the international Teletubbies phenomenon, TV lies at the nexus of globalization and transnational culture.

Planet TV provides an overview of the rapidly changing landscape of global television, combining previously published essays by pioneers of the study of television with new work by cutting-edge television scholars who refine and extend intellectual debates in the field. Organized thematically, the volume explores such issues as cultural imperialism, nationalism, postcolonialism, transnationalism, ethnicity and cultural hybridity. These themes are illuminated by concrete examples and case studies derived from empirical work on global television industries, programs, and audiences in diverse social, historical, and cultural contexts.

Developing a new critical framework for exploring the political, economic, sociological and technological dimensions of television cultures, and countering the assumption that global television is merely a result of the current dominance of the West in world affairs, Planet TV demonstrates that the global dimensions of television were imagined into existence very early on in its contentious history. Parks and Kumar have assembled the critical moments in television's past in order to understand its present and future.

Contributors include Ien Ang, Arjun Appadurai, Jose B. Capino, Michael Curtin, Jo Ellen Fair, John Fiske, Faye Ginsburg, R. Harindranath, Timothy Havens, Edward S. Herman, Michele Hilmes, Olaf Hoerschelmann, Shanti Kumar, Moya Luckett, Robert McChesney, Divya C. McMillin, Nicholas Mirzoeff, David Morley, Hamid Naficy, Lisa Parks, James Schwoch, John Sinclair, R. Anderson Sutton, Serra Tinic, John Tomlinson, and Mimi White.

Synopsis:

View the Table of Contents.

Read the Introduction.

aWhen a crime scene is in cyberspace, forget the yellow tape. Boundaries, along with evidence and procedure, need to be re-envisioned. Or, as Daniel E. Geer Jr. puts it: aDigital law is and must be counterintuitivea because our intuitions about the physical world can be misleading when applied to the digital realm. Mr. Geer's essay on the aphysics of digital lawa is a fitting start to Cybercrime: Digital Cops in a Networked Environment, a collection of writings assembled by the Information Society Project, at Yale Law School.a

--The Chronicle of Higher Education

Cybercrime is written by the leading academic experts and government officials who team together to present a state-of-the-art vision for how to detect and prevent digital crime, creating the blueprint for how to police the dangerous back alleys of the global Internet.

--Peter P. Swire, C. William O'Neill Professor of Law, the Ohio State University, and former Chief Counselor for Privacy, U.S. Office of Management & Budget.

A timely and important collection of materials from highly qualified authors. Cybercrime will provide a wealth of new insights both for general readers and for those who study and teach about the legal and policy implications of the internet.

--David Johnson, Visiting Professor of Law, New York Law School

The Internet has dramatically altered the landscape of crime and national security, creating new threats, such as identity theft, computer viruses, and cyberattacks. Moreover, because cybercrimes are often not limited to a single site or nation, crime scenes themselves have changed. Consequently, law enforcement must confrontthese new dangers and embrace novel methods of prevention, as well as produce new tools for digital surveillance - which can jeopardize privacy and civil liberties.

Cybercrime brings together leading experts in law, criminal justice, and security studies to describe crime prevention and security protection in the electronic age. Ranging from new government requirements that facilitate spying to new methods of digital proof, the book is essential to understand how criminal law-and even crime itself-have been transformed in our networked world.

Contributors: Jack M. Balkin, Susan W. Brenner, Daniel E. Geer, Jr., James Grimmelmann, Emily Hancock, Beryl A. Howell, Curtis E.A. Karnow, Eddan Katz, Orin S. Kerr, Nimrod Kozlovski, Helen Nissenbaum, Kim A. Taipale, Lee Tien, Shlomit Wagman, and Tal Zarsky.

Synopsis:

The Internet has dramatically altered the landscape of crime and national security, creating new threats, such as identity theft, computer viruses, and cyberattacks. Moreover, because cybercrimes are often not limited to a single site or nation, crime scenes themselves have changed. Consequently, law enforcement must confront these new dangers and embrace novel methods of prevention, as well as produce new tools for digital surveillance—which can jeopardize privacy and civil liberties.

Cybercrime brings together leading experts in law, criminal justice, and security studies to describe crime prevention and security protection in the electronic age. Ranging from new government requirements that facilitate spying to new methods of digital proof, the book is essential to understand how criminal law—and even crime itself—have been transformed in our networked world.

Contributors: Jack M. Balkin, Susan W. Brenner, Daniel E. Geer, Jr., James Grimmelmann, Emily Hancock, Beryl A. Howell, Curtis E.A. Karnow, Eddan Katz, Orin S. Kerr, Nimrod Kozlovski, Helen Nissenbaum, Kim A. Taipale, Lee Tien, Shlomit Wagman, and Tal Zarsky.

About the Author

Jack M. Balkin is Knight Professor of Constitutional Law and the First Amendment at Yale Law School, and the founder and director of Yales Information Society Project. He is the author of numerous books and the editor of What Brown v. Board of Education Should Have Said (NYU Press, 2002). He lives in New Haven, CT.

James Grimmelmann, Nimrod Kozlovski, Shlomit Wagman, and Tal Zarsky are Fellows of the ISP.

Eddan Katz is the Executive Director of the Information Society Project.

Eddan Katz is International Affairs Director for the Electronic Frontier Foundation. Before EFF, Eddan was the Executive Director of the Yale Information Society Project and Lecturer-in-Law at Yale Law School. He is co-editor of Cybercrime: Digital Cops in a Networked Environment.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780814799833
Author:
Balkin, Jack
Publisher:
New York University Press
Editor:
Balkin, Jack M.
Editor:
Grimmelmann, James
Editor:
Katz, Eddan
Author:
Kumar, Shanti
Author:
Wagman, And Tal Zarsky
Author:
Wagman, and Tal Zarsky, Shlomit
Author:
Parks, Lisa
Author:
Kozlovski, Nimrod
Author:
Wagman, Shlomit
Author:
Katz, Eddan
Author:
Grimmelmann, James
Author:
Balkin, Jack M.
Author:
and Tal Zarsky, Shlomit Wagman
Author:
Balkin, J. M.
Subject:
General
Subject:
Computer crimes
Subject:
Computer security
Subject:
Computer & Internet
Subject:
Security - General
Subject:
Internet--Law and legislation
Subject:
Computer crimes -- United States -- Prevention.
Subject:
Criminology
Subject:
Criminal Law
Subject:
Crime - True Crime
Subject:
Popular Culture
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
Ex Machina: Law, Technology, and Society
Publication Date:
20070331
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Pages:
268
Dimensions:
6 x 9 in

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Related Subjects

Computers and Internet » Internet » General
Computers and Internet » Networking » Computer Security
History and Social Science » Crime » Prevention
History and Social Science » Crime » True Crime
History and Social Science » Law » Computer and Internet
Sports and Outdoors » Sports and Fitness » Baseball » General

Cybercrime: Digital Cops in a Networked Environment (Ex Machina: Law, Technology, and Society) Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$14.95 In Stock
Product details 268 pages New York University Press - English 9780814799833 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , View the Table of Contents.

Read the Introduction.

aWhen a crime scene is in cyberspace, forget the yellow tape. Boundaries, along with evidence and procedure, need to be re-envisioned. Or, as Daniel E. Geer Jr. puts it: aDigital law is and must be counterintuitivea because our intuitions about the physical world can be misleading when applied to the digital realm. Mr. Geer's essay on the aphysics of digital lawa is a fitting start to Cybercrime: Digital Cops in a Networked Environment, a collection of writings assembled by the Information Society Project, at Yale Law School.a

--The Chronicle of Higher Education

Cybercrime is written by the leading academic experts and government officials who team together to present a state-of-the-art vision for how to detect and prevent digital crime, creating the blueprint for how to police the dangerous back alleys of the global Internet.

--Peter P. Swire, C. William O'Neill Professor of Law, the Ohio State University, and former Chief Counselor for Privacy, U.S. Office of Management & Budget.

A timely and important collection of materials from highly qualified authors. Cybercrime will provide a wealth of new insights both for general readers and for those who study and teach about the legal and policy implications of the internet.

--David Johnson, Visiting Professor of Law, New York Law School

The Internet has dramatically altered the landscape of crime and national security, creating new threats, such as identity theft, computer viruses, and cyberattacks. Moreover, because cybercrimes are often not limited to a single site or nation, crime scenes themselves have changed. Consequently, law enforcement must confrontthese new dangers and embrace novel methods of prevention, as well as produce new tools for digital surveillance - which can jeopardize privacy and civil liberties.

Cybercrime brings together leading experts in law, criminal justice, and security studies to describe crime prevention and security protection in the electronic age. Ranging from new government requirements that facilitate spying to new methods of digital proof, the book is essential to understand how criminal law-and even crime itself-have been transformed in our networked world.

Contributors: Jack M. Balkin, Susan W. Brenner, Daniel E. Geer, Jr., James Grimmelmann, Emily Hancock, Beryl A. Howell, Curtis E.A. Karnow, Eddan Katz, Orin S. Kerr, Nimrod Kozlovski, Helen Nissenbaum, Kim A. Taipale, Lee Tien, Shlomit Wagman, and Tal Zarsky.

"Synopsis" by , The Internet has dramatically altered the landscape of crime and national security, creating new threats, such as identity theft, computer viruses, and cyberattacks. Moreover, because cybercrimes are often not limited to a single site or nation, crime scenes themselves have changed. Consequently, law enforcement must confront these new dangers and embrace novel methods of prevention, as well as produce new tools for digital surveillance—which can jeopardize privacy and civil liberties.

Cybercrime brings together leading experts in law, criminal justice, and security studies to describe crime prevention and security protection in the electronic age. Ranging from new government requirements that facilitate spying to new methods of digital proof, the book is essential to understand how criminal law—and even crime itself—have been transformed in our networked world.

Contributors: Jack M. Balkin, Susan W. Brenner, Daniel E. Geer, Jr., James Grimmelmann, Emily Hancock, Beryl A. Howell, Curtis E.A. Karnow, Eddan Katz, Orin S. Kerr, Nimrod Kozlovski, Helen Nissenbaum, Kim A. Taipale, Lee Tien, Shlomit Wagman, and Tal Zarsky.

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