Summer Reading B2G1 Free
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN a $100 Credit

Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news
for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

Visit our stores


    Recently Viewed clear list


    Lists | July 16, 2015

    Annie Liontas: IMG "You Want Me to Smell My Fingers?": Five Unforgettable Greek Idioms



    The word "idiom" originates in the Greek word ídios ("one's own") and means "special feature" or "special phrasing." Idioms are peculiar because,... Continue »
    1. $18.20 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

      Let Me Explain You

      Annie Liontas 9781476789088

    spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$27.75
New Trade Paper
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
available for shipping or prepaid pickup only
Available for In-store Pickup
in 7 to 12 days
Qty Store Section
1 Remote Warehouse Ethnic Studies- Asian American

More copies of this ISBN

This title in other editions

Haunting the Korean Diaspora: Shame, Secrecy, and the Forgotten War

by

Haunting the Korean Diaspora: Shame, Secrecy, and the Forgotten War Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Synopsis:

Since the Korean War—the forgotten war—more than a million Korean women have acted as sex workers for U.S. servicemen. More than 100,000 women married GIs and moved to the United States. Through intellectual vigor and personal recollection, Haunting the Korean Diaspora explores the repressed history of emotional and physical violence between the United States and Korea and the unexamined reverberations of sexual relationships between Korean women and American soldiers.

Grace M. Cho exposes how Koreans in the United States have been profoundly affected by the forgotten war and uncovers the silences and secrets that still surround it, arguing that trauma memories have been passed unconsciously through a process psychoanalysts call “transgenerational haunting.” Tracing how such secrets have turned into “ghosts,” Cho investigates the mythic figure of the yanggongju, literally the “Western princess,” who provides sexual favors to American military personnel. She reveals how this figure haunts both the intimate realm of memory and public discourse, in which narratives of U.S. benevolence abroad and assimilation of immigrants at home go unchallenged. Memories of U.S. violence, Cho writes, threaten to undo these narratives—and so they have been rendered unspeakable.

At once political and deeply personal, Cho’s wide-ranging and innovative analysis of U.S. neocolonialism and militarism under contemporary globalization brings forth a new way of understanding—and remembering—the impact of the Korean War.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780816652754
Author:
Cho, Grace M.
Publisher:
University of Minnesota Press
Subject:
Women
Subject:
Immigrants
Subject:
Military - Korean War
Subject:
Ethnic Studies - Asian American Studies
Subject:
Women's Studies - General
Subject:
SOC043000
Subject:
Korean American women - Psychology
Subject:
Korean Americans -- Psychology.
Subject:
Ethnic Studies-Asian American
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Paperback
Publication Date:
20081131
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
16 bandw photos
Pages:
232
Dimensions:
9 x 6 x 0.8 in

Other books you might like

  1. Defining America Through Immigration... New Trade Paper $45.50

Related Subjects

» History and Social Science » Ethnic Studies » Asian American
» History and Social Science » Feminist Studies » Peace and War
» History and Social Science » Gender Studies » General
» History and Social Science » Gender Studies » Womens Studies
» History and Social Science » Military » Korean War
» History and Social Science » World History » General

Haunting the Korean Diaspora: Shame, Secrecy, and the Forgotten War New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$27.75 In Stock
Product details 232 pages University of Minnesota Press - English 9780816652754 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
Since the Korean War—the forgotten war—more than a million Korean women have acted as sex workers for U.S. servicemen. More than 100,000 women married GIs and moved to the United States. Through intellectual vigor and personal recollection, Haunting the Korean Diaspora explores the repressed history of emotional and physical violence between the United States and Korea and the unexamined reverberations of sexual relationships between Korean women and American soldiers.

Grace M. Cho exposes how Koreans in the United States have been profoundly affected by the forgotten war and uncovers the silences and secrets that still surround it, arguing that trauma memories have been passed unconsciously through a process psychoanalysts call “transgenerational haunting.” Tracing how such secrets have turned into “ghosts,” Cho investigates the mythic figure of the yanggongju, literally the “Western princess,” who provides sexual favors to American military personnel. She reveals how this figure haunts both the intimate realm of memory and public discourse, in which narratives of U.S. benevolence abroad and assimilation of immigrants at home go unchallenged. Memories of U.S. violence, Cho writes, threaten to undo these narratives—and so they have been rendered unspeakable.

At once political and deeply personal, Cho’s wide-ranging and innovative analysis of U.S. neocolonialism and militarism under contemporary globalization brings forth a new way of understanding—and remembering—the impact of the Korean War.

spacer
spacer
  • back to top

FOLLOW US ON...

     
Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.