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2 Remote Warehouse Music- History and Criticism
1 Remote Warehouse Music- History and Criticism

Out of the Vinyl Deeps: Ellen Willis on Rock Music

by

Out of the Vinyl Deeps: Ellen Willis on Rock Music Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In 1968, the New Yorker hired Ellen Willis as its first popular music critic. Her column, Rock, Etc., ran for seven years and established Willis as a leader in cultural commentary and a pioneer in the nascent and otherwise male-dominated field of rock criticism. As a writer for a magazine with a circulation of nearly half a million, Willis was also the country’s most widely read rock critic. With a voice at once sharp, thoughtful, and ecstatic, she covered a wide range of artists—Bob Dylan, The Who, Van Morrison, Elvis Presley, David Bowie, the Rolling Stones, Creedence Clearwater Revival, Joni Mitchell, the Velvet Underground, Sam and Dave, Bruce Springsteen, and Stevie Wonder—assessing their albums and performances not only on their originality, musicianship, and cultural impact but also in terms of how they made her feel.

Because Willis stopped writing about music in the early 1980s—when, she felt, rock ’n’ roll had lost its political edge—her significant contribution to the history and reception of rock music has been overshadowed by contemporary music critics like Robert Christgau, Lester Bangs, and Dave Marsh. Out of the Vinyl Deeps collects for the first time Willis’s Rock, Etc. columns and her other writings about popular music from this period (includingliner notes for works by Lou Reed and Janis Joplin) and reasserts her rightful place in rock music criticism.

More than simply setting the record straight, Out of the Vinyl Deeps reintroduces Willis’s singular approach and style—her use of music to comment on broader social and political issues, critical acuity, vivid prose, against-the-grain opinions, and distinctly female (and feminist) perspective—to a new generation of readers. Featuring essays by the New Yorker’s current popular music critic, Sasha Frere-Jones, and cultural critics Daphne Carr and Evie Nagy, this volume also provides a lively and still relevant account of rock music during, arguably, its most innovative period.

Review:

"Ellen Willis's appointment as the first popular music critic for the New Yorker in 1968 was not only a radical decision in a male-dominated industry, but also a breakthrough that would alter the entire landscape of rock journalism. This exciting compilation chronicles her seven years at the New Yorker, her time as editor of The Village Voice, and more. Willis's 1967 essay on Bob Dylan was career and era defining. Landing her the post at the New Yorker, it's a testament to her ability to balance obsession and objectivity. With revolutionary insight she saw darkness and beauty as well as humor in The Velvet Underground, was diplomatic in appraising The Beatles, and boldly identified Patti Smith as the female embodiment of rock and roll. Arresting reviews of records and concerts ranging from The Rolling Stones to Van Morrison highlight Willis the awestruck disciple. At a time when music was less understood than it is today, Willis appreciated why musicians combined passion and intellect to not only document their time, but also influence movements. This volume clearly shows what Frere-Jones, the current New Yorker pop music critic, states: 'Willis's pieces retain the mark of their time without being hostage to it.' "
Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Book News Annotation:

Ellen Willis was The New Yorker's first popular music critic, hired in 1968 and the contributor of 56 columns to the publication over seven years. This book edited by Aronowitz, contributor to several publications and co-author of Girldrive: Criss-crossing America, Redefining Feminism, compiles Willis' New Yorker columns as well as some of her other works. Being the first successful female pop critic, Willis' work provides an important voice from the socially turbulent late 60s and early 70s. This book appeals to those with an interest in American popular music and feminism. Annotation ©2011 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

Rediscover the astute and passionate music writings of the pioneering rock critic for the New Yorker.

About the Author

Ellen Willis (1941-2006) was a groundbreaking radical leftist writer and thinker whose true loves were rock music, feminism, pleasure, and freedom. She was the first pop music critic for the New Yorker and an editor and columnist at the Village Voice. She wrote for numerous publications, including Rolling Stone, the New York Times, the Nation, and Dissent. She was the founder of the Cultural Reporting and Criticism Program at New York University, and she published three books of essays, Beginning to See the Light, No More Nice Girls, and Dont Think, Smile!Nona Willis Aronowitz has written about women, sex, music, technology, film, and youth culture for publications such as the Nation, the New York Observer, the Village Voice, and Salon. She is coauthor of Girldrive: Criss-crossing America, Redefining Feminism. Sasha Frere-Jones is a musician and writer from New York. He is a staff writer for the New Yorker and a member of the bands Ui and Calvinist. Daphne Carr lives and writes in New York City. She is editor of the Best Music Writing series. Evie Nagy is an associate editor at Billboard Magazine.

Table of Contents

Foreword: Opening the Vault Sasha Frere-Jones

Introduction: Wake-up Call Nona Willis Aronowitz

Before the Flood: “Dylan,” from Cheetah (1967)

1. The World-Class Critic

“Two Soul Albums” (November 1968)

“The Who Sell” (July 1969)

“Songs of Innocence and Experience” (February 1970)

“New Morning: Dylan Revisited” (December 1970)

“Breaking the Vinyl Barrier” (July 1971)

“Morrison Live” (June 1972)

“‘Elvis Presley? In Person?” (July 1972)

“Bowies Limitations” (October 1972)

“Frankenstein at the Waldorf” (November 197 )

“The Rolling Stones Now” (December 197 )

“The Best of 74” (January 1975)

Liner notes from Lou Reeds Rock and Roll Diary, 1967-1980 (1980)

“The Velvet Underground,” from Greil Marcuss Stranded (1979)

“The Decade in Rock Lyrics,” from Village Voice (January 1980)

“The New Talking World War III Blues,” from Salon.com (2001)

2. The Adoring Fan

“The Big Ones” (February 1969)

“East versus West” (July 1971)

“Their Generation” (August 1971)

“Yesterdays Papers” (August 1972)

“Creedence As Therapy” (September 1972)

“Believing Bette Midler, Mostly” (December 197 )

“Dylan and Fans: Looking Back, Going On” (February 1974)

“The Abyss,” from Village Voice (June 1979)

3. The Sixties Loyalist

“Pop Ecumenicism” (May 1968)

“Randy Newman” (August 1971)

“George and John” (February 1971)

“Consumer Revolt” (September 1971)

“My Grand Funk Problem—and Ours” (February 1972)

“Into the Seventies, for Real” (December 1972)

“Roseland Nation” (October 197 )

“Sympathy for the Stones” (July 1975)

“Creedence Clearwater Revival,” from Rolling Stone Illustrated History of Rock n Roll (1980)

“Janis Joplin,” from Rolling Stone Illustrated History of Rock n Roll (1980)

Selections from “Dont Turn Your Back on Love,” Liner Notes to Janis, a Janis Joplin Box Set (199 )

4. The Feminist

“But Now Im Gonna Move” (October 1971)

“Joni Mitchell: Still Traveling” (March 197 )

“Womens Music” (June 1974)

“After the Flood” (April 1975)

“Beginning to See the Light,” Village Voice (1977)

Preface to Barbara ODairs Trouble Girls: The Rolling Stone Book of Women in Rock (1997)

5. The Navigator

“Newport: You Cant Go Down Home Again” (August 1968)

“The Scene, 1968” (November 1968)

“Summer of Love in Queens” (July 1969)

“Elvis in Las Vegas” (August 1969)

“The Cultural Revolution Saved from Drowning” (September 1969)

“Stranger in a Strange Land” (December 1969)

“The Return of the Dolls” (January 197 )

“San Francisco Habitat” (August 197 )

6. The Sociologist

“Pop Blues” (April 1968)

“The Ordeal of Moby Grape” (June 1968)

“The Star, the Sound, and the Scene” (July 1968)

“Roots” (February 1969)

“Dylans Anti-Surprise” (April 1969)

“Elliott Murphys White Middle Class Blues” (February 1974)

“Mott the Hoople: Playing the Losers Game” (May 1974)

“Springsteen: The Wild, the Innocent, and the Street Kid Myth” (November 1974)

“The Importance of Stevie Wonder” (December 1974)

Introduction to Beginning to See the Light: Sex, Hope, and Rock n Roll (1981)

Afterword: Raise Your Hand Daphne Carr and Evie Nagy

Product Details

ISBN:
9780816672837
Author:
Aronowitz, Nona Willis
Publisher:
University of Minnesota Press
Author:
Frere-Jones, Sasha
Author:
Willis, Ellen
Author:
Nagy, Evie
Author:
Carr, Daphne
Author:
Willis Aronowitz, Nona
Author:
Nona Willis Aronowitz
Subject:
History & Criticism *
Subject:
Music -- History and criticism.
Edition Description:
Paperback
Publication Date:
20110531
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Pages:
272
Dimensions:
9.25 x 6.13 x 1.5 in

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Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Music » Genres and Styles » Rock
Arts and Entertainment » Music » Genres and Styles » Rock » Reference and Criticism
Arts and Entertainment » Music » History and Criticism
History and Social Science » Sociology » General
Humanities » Philosophy » General
Travel » Travel Writing » General

Out of the Vinyl Deeps: Ellen Willis on Rock Music New Trade Paper
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$22.95 In Stock
Product details 272 pages University of Minnesota Press - English 9780816672837 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Ellen Willis's appointment as the first popular music critic for the New Yorker in 1968 was not only a radical decision in a male-dominated industry, but also a breakthrough that would alter the entire landscape of rock journalism. This exciting compilation chronicles her seven years at the New Yorker, her time as editor of The Village Voice, and more. Willis's 1967 essay on Bob Dylan was career and era defining. Landing her the post at the New Yorker, it's a testament to her ability to balance obsession and objectivity. With revolutionary insight she saw darkness and beauty as well as humor in The Velvet Underground, was diplomatic in appraising The Beatles, and boldly identified Patti Smith as the female embodiment of rock and roll. Arresting reviews of records and concerts ranging from The Rolling Stones to Van Morrison highlight Willis the awestruck disciple. At a time when music was less understood than it is today, Willis appreciated why musicians combined passion and intellect to not only document their time, but also influence movements. This volume clearly shows what Frere-Jones, the current New Yorker pop music critic, states: 'Willis's pieces retain the mark of their time without being hostage to it.' "
Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by ,
Rediscover the astute and passionate music writings of the pioneering rock critic for the New Yorker.
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