Summer Reading Sale
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Original Essays | June 20, 2014

Lauren Owen: IMG The Other Vampire



It's a wild and thundery night. Inside a ramshackle old manor house, a beautiful young girl lies asleep in bed. At the window, a figure watches... Continue »

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$28.00
New Hardcover
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
4 Burnside Great Britain- London

Ghost Milk: Recent Adventures Among the Future Ruins of London on the Eve of the Olympics

by

Ghost Milk: Recent Adventures Among the Future Ruins of London on the Eve of the Olympics Cover

 

Awards

Staff Pick

London's greatest modern chronicler-poet takes on the propaganda parade of the London Olympics.
Recommended by Mark Savage, Powells.com

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

From “an astonishingly original and entertaining writer” (Michael Dirda, The Washington Post) and “our greatest guide to London” (The Spectator), an extraordinary book about a disappearing city.

The Olympics, the story goes, have transformed London into a gleaming, wholly modern city. And East London — Olympic headquarters — is the city's new jewel, provider of unlimited opportunities and better tomorrows. The grime and poverty have been scrubbed away, and huge stadiums and grand public sculptures have taken their place.

The writer Iain Sinclair has lived in East London for four decades, and in Ghost Milk, he tells a very different story about his home: that of a neighborhood turned upside down, of stolen history. Long-beloved parks have vanished; police raids can occur at any time; and high-security exclusion zones — enforced by armed guards and hidden cameras — have steamrolled East London's open streets and public spaces. To prepare for the most public of events, everything has been privatized.

A call to arms against the politicians and public figures who have so doggedly preached the gospel of the Olympics, Ghost Milk is also a brilliant reflection on a changing landscape — and Sinclair's most personal book yet. In an attempt to understand what has happened to his beloved city, Sinclair travels farther afield: he walks along the Thames from the North Sea to Oxford; he rides the bus across northern England; he visits Athens and Berlin, Olympic sites of the recent and distant past.

Elegiac, intimate, and audacious, Ghost Milk is at once a powerful chronicle of memory and loss, in the tradition of W. G. Sebald and Roberto Bolaño, and a passionate interrogation of our embrace of progress at any cost.

Review:

"The 2012 Olympic Games bulldoze soulful working-class London in this lively if labyrinthine urban travelogue-cum-cultural jeremiad. Sinclair (Lights Out for the Territory) decries the 'manifest horror' of Olympics-instigated stadiums, condos, and malls, the evictions of anarchist squatters and immigrant shopkeepers, the ubiquitous security checkpoints and surveillance cameras, the promotional 'CGI visions injected straight into the eyeball' and the 'orgies of lachrymose nationalism.' (He had readings at municipal libraries canceled for 'diss the Olympics.') It's all the epitome, he complains, of a contemptible civilization of soulless corporate fascism, real estate scams, glitzy spectacles, and elitist privatized spaces that he finds everywhere — hiking up the Thames, busing around Liverpool, surveying past Olympic outrages in Berlin and Athens. Sinclair's fragmented narrative whirls through impressionistic observations, snatches of history, film allusions, sketches of literary cronies — novelist J.G. Ballard, bard of apocalyptic suburban blandness, is vividly appreciated — and personal reminiscences. His critique of Olympic-sized inauthenticity isn't terribly novel, and his stereotypically English landscape — intimate, slightly claustrophobic, strewn with cultural referents that Americans won't get — may leave Yanks feeling a bit lost. Still, the acerbic panache of Sinclair's prose makes for a lively ramble. Photos. (July 24)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Review:

“An astonishingly original and entertaining writer.” Michael Dirda, The Washington Post

Review:

“Sentence for sentence, there is no more interesting writer at work in English.” John Lanchester, The Daily Telegraph

Review:

“My favorite writer of the past decade.” William Gibson

Review:

"Sentence for sentence, there is no more interesting writer at work in English than Iain Sinclair." John Lanchester, The Daily Telegraph

Review:

“Sinclair is the poet of the marginal, the interstitial, the forgotten and the occulted.” Hari Kunzru, The Guardian

Review:

“Sinclair [is] a prose stylist almost without peer.” Kenneth Baker, San Francisco Chronicle

Review:

“How best to describe Sinclair? East London's recording angel? Hackney's Pepys? A literary mud-larker and tip-picker? A Travelodge tramp (his phrase)? A middle-class dropout with a gift for bullshit (also his phrase)? A toxicologist of the twenty-first-century landscape? A historian of countercultures and occulted pasts? An intemperate WALL-E, compulsively collecting and compacting the city's textual waste? A psycho-geographer (from which term Sinclair has been rowing away ever since he helped launch it into the mainstream)? He's all of these, and more.” Robert MacFarlane, The Guardian

Synopsis:

An extraordinary, deeply personal book about a disappearing city from “our greatest guide to London” (The Spectator).

East London is gleaming. The stadium is finished, the new Olympic Park is being landscaped, and shopping centers and apartment buildings stand at the ready, eager to be occupied by transient tourists and permanent residents alike.

But the story of London's Olympic renaissance is far from triumphant. Indeed, though the shiny façades are seductive, whole blocks are being ripped apart. The razing of East London is not a simple story of demolition and displacement — it's a story of loss, of a neighborhoods history being stolen from it.

Ghost Milk is a chronicle of a city turned upside down: corner diners have given way to grandiose shopping centers; gated pleasure domes have replaced public parks; and the casual diversity of a neighborhood with centuries of history is being eradicated.

In this majestic book, Iain Sinclair explores the roots of this new London and a worldwide obsession with “grand projects” that stretches from Athens to Beijing. Elegiac, intimate, and audacious, Ghost Milk is a tribute to a great city by its greatest chronicler.

Synopsis:

From “an astonishingly original and entertaining writer” (Michael Dirda, The Washington Post) and “our greatest guide to London” (The Spectator), an extraordinary book about a disappearing city

The Olympics, the story goes, have transformed London into a gleaming, wholly modern city. And East London—Olympic headquarters—is the citys new jewel, provider of unlimited opportunities and better tomorrows. The grime and poverty have been scrubbed away, and huge stadiums and grand public sculptures have taken their place.

The writer Iain Sinclair has lived in East London for four decades, and in Ghost Milk, he tells a very different story about his home: that of a neighborhood turned upside down, of stolen history. Long-beloved parks have vanished; police raids can occur at any time; and high-security exclusion zones—enforced by armed guards and hidden cameras—have steamrolled East Londons open streets and public spaces. To prepare for the most public of events, everything has been privatized.

A call to arms against the politicians and public figures who have so doggedly preached the gospel of the Olympics, Ghost Milk is also a brilliant reflection on a changing landscape—and Sinclairs most personal book yet. In an attempt to understand what has happened to his beloved city, Sinclair travels farther afield: he walks along the Thames from the North Sea to Oxford; he rides the bus across northern England; he visits Athens and Berlin, Olympic sites of the recent and distant past.

Elegiac, intimate, and audacious, Ghost Milk is at once a powerful chronicle of memory and loss, in the tradition of W. G. Sebald and Roberto Bolaño, and a passionate interrogation of our embrace of progress at any cost.

About the Author

Iain Sinclair is the author of many books, including Downriver, Lights Out for the Territory, London Orbital, and Hackney, That Rose-Red Empire. He lives in Hackney, East London.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780865478664
Author:
Sinclair, Iain
Publisher:
Faber & Faber
Author:
Sinclair, Iain
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Artists, Architects, Photographers
Subject:
Europe - Great Britain
Subject:
Biography-Artists Architects and Photographers
Subject:
World History-England General
Subject:
cultural heritage
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20120731
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
48 Black-and-White Illustrations/5 Maps
Pages:
416
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

Other books you might like

  1. Crazy Brave: A Memoir
    Used Hardcover $13.00
  2. Visit Sunny Chernobyl: And Other... Used Trade Paper $10.95
  3. Help Me to Find My People: The... New Hardcover $30.00

Related Subjects


Biography » Artists, Architects, and Photographers
Biography » Literary
Featured Titles » General
History and Social Science » Europe » Great Britain » General History
History and Social Science » Europe » Great Britain » London
History and Social Science » World History » England » General
Sports and Outdoors » Sports and Fitness » Olympics
Travel » Europe » Great Britain

Ghost Milk: Recent Adventures Among the Future Ruins of London on the Eve of the Olympics New Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$28.00 In Stock
Product details 416 pages Faber & Faber - English 9780865478664 Reviews:
"Staff Pick" by ,

London's greatest modern chronicler-poet takes on the propaganda parade of the London Olympics.

"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "The 2012 Olympic Games bulldoze soulful working-class London in this lively if labyrinthine urban travelogue-cum-cultural jeremiad. Sinclair (Lights Out for the Territory) decries the 'manifest horror' of Olympics-instigated stadiums, condos, and malls, the evictions of anarchist squatters and immigrant shopkeepers, the ubiquitous security checkpoints and surveillance cameras, the promotional 'CGI visions injected straight into the eyeball' and the 'orgies of lachrymose nationalism.' (He had readings at municipal libraries canceled for 'diss the Olympics.') It's all the epitome, he complains, of a contemptible civilization of soulless corporate fascism, real estate scams, glitzy spectacles, and elitist privatized spaces that he finds everywhere — hiking up the Thames, busing around Liverpool, surveying past Olympic outrages in Berlin and Athens. Sinclair's fragmented narrative whirls through impressionistic observations, snatches of history, film allusions, sketches of literary cronies — novelist J.G. Ballard, bard of apocalyptic suburban blandness, is vividly appreciated — and personal reminiscences. His critique of Olympic-sized inauthenticity isn't terribly novel, and his stereotypically English landscape — intimate, slightly claustrophobic, strewn with cultural referents that Americans won't get — may leave Yanks feeling a bit lost. Still, the acerbic panache of Sinclair's prose makes for a lively ramble. Photos. (July 24)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Review" by , “An astonishingly original and entertaining writer.”
"Review" by , “Sentence for sentence, there is no more interesting writer at work in English.”
"Review" by , “My favorite writer of the past decade.”
"Review" by , "Sentence for sentence, there is no more interesting writer at work in English than Iain Sinclair."
"Review" by , “Sinclair is the poet of the marginal, the interstitial, the forgotten and the occulted.”
"Review" by , “Sinclair [is] a prose stylist almost without peer.”
"Review" by , “How best to describe Sinclair? East London's recording angel? Hackney's Pepys? A literary mud-larker and tip-picker? A Travelodge tramp (his phrase)? A middle-class dropout with a gift for bullshit (also his phrase)? A toxicologist of the twenty-first-century landscape? A historian of countercultures and occulted pasts? An intemperate WALL-E, compulsively collecting and compacting the city's textual waste? A psycho-geographer (from which term Sinclair has been rowing away ever since he helped launch it into the mainstream)? He's all of these, and more.”
"Synopsis" by , An extraordinary, deeply personal book about a disappearing city from “our greatest guide to London” (The Spectator).

East London is gleaming. The stadium is finished, the new Olympic Park is being landscaped, and shopping centers and apartment buildings stand at the ready, eager to be occupied by transient tourists and permanent residents alike.

But the story of London's Olympic renaissance is far from triumphant. Indeed, though the shiny façades are seductive, whole blocks are being ripped apart. The razing of East London is not a simple story of demolition and displacement — it's a story of loss, of a neighborhoods history being stolen from it.

Ghost Milk is a chronicle of a city turned upside down: corner diners have given way to grandiose shopping centers; gated pleasure domes have replaced public parks; and the casual diversity of a neighborhood with centuries of history is being eradicated.

In this majestic book, Iain Sinclair explores the roots of this new London and a worldwide obsession with “grand projects” that stretches from Athens to Beijing. Elegiac, intimate, and audacious, Ghost Milk is a tribute to a great city by its greatest chronicler.

"Synopsis" by , From “an astonishingly original and entertaining writer” (Michael Dirda, The Washington Post) and “our greatest guide to London” (The Spectator), an extraordinary book about a disappearing city

The Olympics, the story goes, have transformed London into a gleaming, wholly modern city. And East London—Olympic headquarters—is the citys new jewel, provider of unlimited opportunities and better tomorrows. The grime and poverty have been scrubbed away, and huge stadiums and grand public sculptures have taken their place.

The writer Iain Sinclair has lived in East London for four decades, and in Ghost Milk, he tells a very different story about his home: that of a neighborhood turned upside down, of stolen history. Long-beloved parks have vanished; police raids can occur at any time; and high-security exclusion zones—enforced by armed guards and hidden cameras—have steamrolled East Londons open streets and public spaces. To prepare for the most public of events, everything has been privatized.

A call to arms against the politicians and public figures who have so doggedly preached the gospel of the Olympics, Ghost Milk is also a brilliant reflection on a changing landscape—and Sinclairs most personal book yet. In an attempt to understand what has happened to his beloved city, Sinclair travels farther afield: he walks along the Thames from the North Sea to Oxford; he rides the bus across northern England; he visits Athens and Berlin, Olympic sites of the recent and distant past.

Elegiac, intimate, and audacious, Ghost Milk is at once a powerful chronicle of memory and loss, in the tradition of W. G. Sebald and Roberto Bolaño, and a passionate interrogation of our embrace of progress at any cost.

spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.