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1 Burnside Mystery- A to Z
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Three to Kill

by

Three to Kill Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Businessman Georges Gerfaut witnesses a murder — and is pursued by the killers. His conventional life knocked off the rails, Gerfaut turns the tables and sets out to track down his pursuers. And what does he discover along the way?

French thriller writer Manchette — masterful stylist, ironist, and social critic — limns the cramped lives of professionals in a neo-conservative world.

Review:

"A social satire cum suspense equally interested in dissecting everyday banalities and manufacturing thrills. Writing with economy, deadpan irony, and an eye for the devastating detail, Manchette spins pulp fiction into literature." Kirkus Reviews

Review:

"The theme of paranoid man-on-the-run is a staple of B-thrillers, but the author shows such superb elan in handling the material that it almost seems as if he's the first to craft it....The occasional touches of dark humor recall Charles Willeford, the passages of sinewy prose the spare musculature of Richard Stark's early Parker novels. Manchette is a must for the reading lists of all noir fans." Publishers Weekly

Review:

"[T]he author breathes new life into a popular noir formula....Manchette's left-wing politics drive the story in occasionally intrusive ways, but, ironically, what makes the tale come alive is the coldly impersonal narrative style, evoking both Camus and Jean-Paul Melville's exquisitely icy film Le Samurai." Bill Ott, Booklist

Review:

"For Manchette and his generation of writers who followed him, the crime novel is no mere entertainment, but a means to strip bare the failures of society, ripping through veils of appearance, deceit, and manipulation to the greed and violence that are society's true engines." The Boston Globe

Review:

"It's an old storyline, but Manchette tweaks it playfully, and to no predictable end. Neither Georges's class consciousness nor an appreciation for the yuppie good life are awakened by the experience, only insubstantial longings and a capability for brutality he didn't know he had." Ben Ehrenreich, The Village Voice

Review:

"[W]onderful....Dark, ironic, funny, quickly paced, translated from the French, and very, very cool." Ann Romeo, MurderInk.com

Review:

"From the first page of Three to Kill, from virtually any page of Manchette, you know right away you're in the hands of a master, and that the ride will be a rapid, unsettling, often terrifying one....Manchette's are lean, muscular books that deserve serious reading." James Sallis

Synopsis:

First in English for Manchette, renovator of French noir; trenchant social critique laced with black humor.

Synopsis:

Businessman Georges Gerfaut witnesses a murder—and is pursued by the killers. His conventional life knocked off the rails, Gerfaut turns the tables and sets out to track down his pursuers. Along the way, he learns a thing or two about himself.... Manchette—masterful stylist, ironist, and social critic—limns the cramped lives of professionals in a neo-conservative world.

Jean-Patrick Manchette (1942—1995) rescued the French crime novel from the grip of stodgy police procedurals—restoring the noir edge by virtue of his post-1968 leftism. Today, Manchette is a totem to the generation of French mystery writers who came in his wake. Jazz saxophonist, political activist, and screen writer, Manchette was influenced as much by Guy Debord as by Gustave Flaubert.

About the Author

Jean-Patrick Manchette (1942-1995) was the author of 11 noir novels, of which Three To Kill is the first to be published in English. An amateur jazz saxophonist, one-time political activist and prolific TV screen writer and literary critic, Manchette renewed French noir in the post-1968 period and established the new genre of the néo-polar. His writing was influenced as much by Guy Debord as by Gustave Flaubert.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780872863958
Translator:
Nicholson-Smith, Donald
Publisher:
Noir
Translator:
Nicholson-Smith, Donald
Author:
holson-Smith, Donald
Author:
Manchette, Jean-Patrick
Author:
Nicholson-Smith, Donald
Author:
Nic
Location:
San Francisco
Subject:
France
Subject:
Mystery & Detective - General
Subject:
Noir fiction
Subject:
Mystery-A to Z
Subject:
Mystery & Detective - Hard-Boiled
Copyright:
Edition Number:
1st U.S. ed.
Edition Description:
Trade Paper
Series:
City Lights Noir
Series Volume:
01
Publication Date:
January 2002
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
185
Dimensions:
7.3 x 5 x 0.4 in 5 oz

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Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Mystery » A to Z

Three to Kill New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$13.95 In Stock
Product details 185 pages Noir - English 9780872863958 Reviews:
"Review" by , "A social satire cum suspense equally interested in dissecting everyday banalities and manufacturing thrills. Writing with economy, deadpan irony, and an eye for the devastating detail, Manchette spins pulp fiction into literature."
"Review" by , "The theme of paranoid man-on-the-run is a staple of B-thrillers, but the author shows such superb elan in handling the material that it almost seems as if he's the first to craft it....The occasional touches of dark humor recall Charles Willeford, the passages of sinewy prose the spare musculature of Richard Stark's early Parker novels. Manchette is a must for the reading lists of all noir fans."
"Review" by , "[T]he author breathes new life into a popular noir formula....Manchette's left-wing politics drive the story in occasionally intrusive ways, but, ironically, what makes the tale come alive is the coldly impersonal narrative style, evoking both Camus and Jean-Paul Melville's exquisitely icy film Le Samurai."
"Review" by , "For Manchette and his generation of writers who followed him, the crime novel is no mere entertainment, but a means to strip bare the failures of society, ripping through veils of appearance, deceit, and manipulation to the greed and violence that are society's true engines."
"Review" by , "It's an old storyline, but Manchette tweaks it playfully, and to no predictable end. Neither Georges's class consciousness nor an appreciation for the yuppie good life are awakened by the experience, only insubstantial longings and a capability for brutality he didn't know he had."
"Review" by , "[W]onderful....Dark, ironic, funny, quickly paced, translated from the French, and very, very cool."
"Review" by , "From the first page of Three to Kill, from virtually any page of Manchette, you know right away you're in the hands of a master, and that the ride will be a rapid, unsettling, often terrifying one....Manchette's are lean, muscular books that deserve serious reading."
"Synopsis" by ,
First in English for Manchette, renovator of French noir; trenchant social critique laced with black humor.
"Synopsis" by ,

Businessman Georges Gerfaut witnesses a murder—and is pursued by the killers. His conventional life knocked off the rails, Gerfaut turns the tables and sets out to track down his pursuers. Along the way, he learns a thing or two about himself.... Manchette—masterful stylist, ironist, and social critic—limns the cramped lives of professionals in a neo-conservative world.

Jean-Patrick Manchette (1942—1995) rescued the French crime novel from the grip of stodgy police procedurals—restoring the noir edge by virtue of his post-1968 leftism. Today, Manchette is a totem to the generation of French mystery writers who came in his wake. Jazz saxophonist, political activist, and screen writer, Manchette was influenced as much by Guy Debord as by Gustave Flaubert.

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