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An Architectural Guidebook to Portland

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An Architectural Guidebook to Portland Cover

ISBN13: 9780879059910
ISBN10: 0879059915
Condition: Standard
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

A graceful combination of eccentric and traditional architecture.

Portland, Oregon, is a city widely known for its civic planning, preservation of historic buildings, attractiveness, and inviting atmosphere.

Within the five-mile downtown district can be found skyscrapers, nineteenth-century cast-iron-front buildings, a riverfront park, old brick warehouses and breweries still in operation, a train station with a 150-foot clock tower, five bridges, and a rich assortment of museums, government buildings, and shops. With more than 250 entries, this comprehensive guide includes the following:

Pioneer Courthouse

Union Station

Chinese Classical Garden

U.S. Bancorp Tower

Historic Bridges

U.S. National Bank Building

Additional updates and expanded information can be found at: teleport.com/ kilm2/home.html

Review:

"[The book is] witty, informative, and accurate. I suspect it will be in print for a long time and a very useful addition to books on Oregon architecture...your perceptive view of Portland architecture is fresh and informative and you have my profound congratulations on a job well done." Wallace Kay Huntington

Review:

"Take a tour of my favorite city with this guide in hand and learn about Portland's architecture (the good and the bad), its history, its personalities, and its beauty. Bart King has provided a comprehensive look at Portland's architectural heritage." Vera Katz, Mayor, City of Portland

Review:

"Don't be fooled by the title An Architectural Guidebook to Portland.

While it is true that the book identifies designers...it is also true that the text is rich in Portland history, anecdotes, and just plain stories. As a bonus, teacher Bart King isn't afraid to wax downright poetic when the mood strikes him.

This wonderful book discusses more than 250 sites throughout Portland....Its contents include descriptions of buildings and other structures, but King never rests on that sort of information...

This book is a plethora of riches, an irresistible read and a fine guide to many of Portland¹s unique buildings and areas. It is full of useful maps and lots and lots and lots of black-and-white photographs by the author. The photos are a treasure in-and-of themselves." Dan Hays, The Statesman Journal

Review:

"How well do you know Portland? Here's a test: Do you know where the Rose Festival crown is stored? Or what the "Made in Oregon" sign originally advertised? Which Portland church was modeled after yogurt cups?

These are just a few of the quirkier facts found in An Architectural Guidebook to Portland. Bart King's book is Architecture 101, but a little more fun. It provides brief historical descriptions of approximately 250 Portland structures 'that have distinguished or disgraced themselves in some interesting fashion.'

...for casual observers who have found themselves admiring the wide variety of architectural styles abundant throughout the city, it offers the perfect amount of interesting and enlightening information in a very accessible format." Sarah Gianelli, The Oregonian

Review:

"As author Bart King says in his introduction, this book is not a listing of all or even most of Portland's buildings, but rather a collection of buildings that have distinguished or disgraced themselves in some interesting fashion.

And so it is that in the 310 pages that follow, we find the cracker box designs of the Standard Insurance Center, the Security Pacific Building and the Union Bank of California keeping company with the octagonal wooden cupola atop Pioneer Courthouse, the rococo facade of the Hollywood Movie Theater and the turret of the Queen Anne-style Johan Poulsen House, just as they do in the city itself.

Some of the building descriptions are even more intriguing than their accompanying black-and-white photos. Toni Stroud, Chicago Tribune

Review:

"...As King's comprehensive survey of Portland architecture reveals, ours is not a place for landmarks, but rather a fabric of smaller-scale new and historically preserved projects that achieve collective harmony. It's not flashy, but it works....take a stroll through Portland (either literally or in King's book) and you'll find an array of small treasures that might have fallen victim to the wrecking ball in other cities.

King not only examines the city's architecture, but provides the social history behind it as well, such as the famous dialogue between Pietro Belluschi and Frank Lloyd Wright that gave birth to the Art Museum....If other cities have diamonds, we have a string of pearls." Brian Libby, Willamette Week

Book News Annotation:

This is a charming, accessible guide of interest to visitors to Portland, Oregon, as well as to locals. The author, a Portland teacher with a background in history, offers informal background and description of some 250 noteworthy buildings in the city, and a few in the region, as well as some bridges, gardens, and neighborhoods. Each is described in terms of its origins, significance, and current status, and illustrated with a small b&w photo. Maps and an extensive bibliography are included.
Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

sgeorge24, August 31, 2011 (view all comments by sgeorge24)
This book has far more information than you would think for a book its size. Bart King delivers facts about Portland's old and new buildings with an entertaining sense of humor. Just reading the book is like a walking tour of the whole city. But even better...bring the book on a real tour of the interesting architectural wonders of Portland!
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No

Product Details

ISBN:
9780879059910
Introduction:
Iska, James
Author:
Katz, Mayor Vera
Publisher:
Gibbs Smith Publishers
Location:
Salt Lake City
Subject:
Reference
Subject:
Architecture
Subject:
Oregon
Subject:
U.S. Architecture - General
Subject:
Portland
Copyright:
Edition Number:
1st ed.
Series Volume:
no. 31
Publication Date:
April 2001
Binding:
Paperback
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Yes
Pages:
310
Dimensions:
8.48x5.84x.88 in. 1.23 lbs.

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Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Architecture » Pocket Books
Arts and Entertainment » Architecture » United States » West
History and Social Science » Pacific Northwest » Architecture

An Architectural Guidebook to Portland Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$14.95 In Stock
Product details 310 pages Gibbs Smith Publishers - English 9780879059910 Reviews:
"Review" by , "[The book is] witty, informative, and accurate. I suspect it will be in print for a long time and a very useful addition to books on Oregon architecture...your perceptive view of Portland architecture is fresh and informative and you have my profound congratulations on a job well done."
"Review" by , "Take a tour of my favorite city with this guide in hand and learn about Portland's architecture (the good and the bad), its history, its personalities, and its beauty. Bart King has provided a comprehensive look at Portland's architectural heritage."
"Review" by , "Don't be fooled by the title An Architectural Guidebook to Portland.

While it is true that the book identifies designers...it is also true that the text is rich in Portland history, anecdotes, and just plain stories. As a bonus, teacher Bart King isn't afraid to wax downright poetic when the mood strikes him.

This wonderful book discusses more than 250 sites throughout Portland....Its contents include descriptions of buildings and other structures, but King never rests on that sort of information...

This book is a plethora of riches, an irresistible read and a fine guide to many of Portland¹s unique buildings and areas. It is full of useful maps and lots and lots and lots of black-and-white photographs by the author. The photos are a treasure in-and-of themselves." Dan Hays, The Statesman Journal

"Review" by , "How well do you know Portland? Here's a test: Do you know where the Rose Festival crown is stored? Or what the "Made in Oregon" sign originally advertised? Which Portland church was modeled after yogurt cups?

These are just a few of the quirkier facts found in An Architectural Guidebook to Portland. Bart King's book is Architecture 101, but a little more fun. It provides brief historical descriptions of approximately 250 Portland structures 'that have distinguished or disgraced themselves in some interesting fashion.'

...for casual observers who have found themselves admiring the wide variety of architectural styles abundant throughout the city, it offers the perfect amount of interesting and enlightening information in a very accessible format." Sarah Gianelli, The Oregonian

"Review" by , "As author Bart King says in his introduction, this book is not a listing of all or even most of Portland's buildings, but rather a collection of buildings that have distinguished or disgraced themselves in some interesting fashion.

And so it is that in the 310 pages that follow, we find the cracker box designs of the Standard Insurance Center, the Security Pacific Building and the Union Bank of California keeping company with the octagonal wooden cupola atop Pioneer Courthouse, the rococo facade of the Hollywood Movie Theater and the turret of the Queen Anne-style Johan Poulsen House, just as they do in the city itself.

Some of the building descriptions are even more intriguing than their accompanying black-and-white photos. Toni Stroud, Chicago Tribune

"Review" by , "...As King's comprehensive survey of Portland architecture reveals, ours is not a place for landmarks, but rather a fabric of smaller-scale new and historically preserved projects that achieve collective harmony. It's not flashy, but it works....take a stroll through Portland (either literally or in King's book) and you'll find an array of small treasures that might have fallen victim to the wrecking ball in other cities.

King not only examines the city's architecture, but provides the social history behind it as well, such as the famous dialogue between Pietro Belluschi and Frank Lloyd Wright that gave birth to the Art Museum....If other cities have diamonds, we have a string of pearls." Brian Libby, Willamette Week

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