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25 Local Warehouse Biography- General

This title in other editions

Last Letters from Attu: The True Story of Etta Jones, Alaska Pioneer and Japanese P.O.W.

by

Last Letters from Attu: The True Story of Etta Jones, Alaska Pioneer and Japanese P.O.W. Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Etta Jones was not a World War II soldier or a  war time spy. She was an American school teacher who in 1941 who along with her husband, Foster agreed to teach the Natives on the remote Aleutian island of Attu.  They were both sixty-two years old when they left Alaska's mainland for Attu against the advice of friends and family.   Etta, and her sister moved to the Territory of Alaska in 1922.  She planned to stay only one year as a vacation, but this 40 something year old nurse from back east met Foster Jones and fell in love. She married and for nearly twenty years they taught in remote Alaskan villages including their last posting on  Attu Island at the far end of the Aleutian island chain. Etta's life changed forever on that Sunday morning in June 1942  when almost 2,000 Japanese military men invaded Attu Island and Etta became a prisoner of war. She was taken from American soil to Japan and given up for dead. This is the story of a brave American, a woman of courage and resolve with inextinguishable spirit. 

Synopsis:

In June 1942 the Japanese army invaded Attu, a remote island at the end of the Aleutian Chain. Soldiers occupied the village for two months before taking its Alaska Native residents to Japan, where they were held until the end of the war. After harassing American and Canadian forces for little over a year, the Japanese forces quietly withdrew. After the war, the Attuans' return to Alaska was not a joyful reunion. When they were released, the Attuans were not allowed to return to their home, but were settled instead in Atka, several hundred miles from Attu.and#160;

and#160;

Attu Boy is Nick Golodoffand#8217;s memoir of his experience as a prisoner of war in Japan during World War II as a young boy. Nick was six years old when Japanese soldiers invaded his remote Aleutian village. Along with theand#160; other Unangan Attu residents, Nick and his family were taken to Hokkaido, Japan. Only 25 of the Attuans survived the war; the others died of hunger, malnutrition, and disease. Nick tells his story from the unique viewpoint of a child who experienced friendly relationships with some of the Japanese captors along with harsh treatment from others. Other voices join Nickand#8217;s to give the book a broad sense of the struggles, triumphs, and heartbreak of lives disrupted by war.and#160; and#160;

Synopsis:

In the quiet of morning, exactly six months after Pearl Harbor, the Japanese touched down on American soil. Landing on the remote Alaska island of Attu, they assailed an entire village, holding the Alaskan villagers for two months and eventually corralling all survivors into a freighter bound for Japan.

One of those survivors, Nick Golodoff, became a prisoner of war at just six years old. He was among the dozens of Unangan Attu residents swept away to Hokkaido, and one of only twenty-five to survive. Attu Boy tells Golodoffand#8217;s story of these harrowing years as he found both friendship and cruelty at the hands of the Japanese. It offers a rare look at the lives of civilian prisoners and their captors in WWII-era Japan. It also tells of Golodoffand#8217;s bittersweet return to a homeland torn apart by occupation and forced internments. Interwoven with other voices from Attu, this richly illustrated memoir is a testament to the struggles, triumphs, and heartbreak of lives disrupted by war.

About the Author

A Michigan native, with a B.A. and M.A., Mary Breu taught elementary school for 34 years. She and her husband live in South Carolina with their two children. Etta Jones is Breu's great aunt.

Table of Contents

Preface                                                                           9

To Alaska                                                                      13

Tanana: 1922-1923                                                         27

Tanana: 1923-1930                                                         37

Tanana, Tatitlek, and Old Harbor: 1928-1932                    53

Prom Kodiak to Kipnuk: 1932                                         70

Kipnuk Culture: 1932                                                      79

Letters from Kipnuk: 1932-1933                                      91

Kipnuk School: 1932-1934                                             112

Letters from Kipnuk: 1934-1937                                     119

 

Old Harbor: 1937-1941                                                  135  

Attu: 1941-1942                                                            148

Invasion: 1942                                                              167

The Australians: January-July 1942                                181

Bund Hotel, Yokohama: July 1942                                 193

Yokohama Yacht Club: 1942-1943                                 203

Yokohama Yacht Club: 1943-1944                                 213

Totsuka: 1944-1945                                                       227

Rescue: August 31, 1945                                              245

Return to the United States: September 1945                 255

Home: 1945-1965                                                         266

Afterword by Ray Hudson                                             279

Acknowledgements                                                      281

Notes                                                                          283

Bibliography                                                                305

Index                                                                           307

About the author                                                          317

About the Afterword writer                                            319

 

Product Details

ISBN:
9780882408101
Author:
Breu, Mary
Publisher:
Alaska Northwest Books
Author:
Maly, Brenda
Author:
Hudson, Ray
Author:
Mason, Rachel
Author:
Golodoff, Nick
Afterword by:
Hudson, Ray
Afterword:
Hudson, Ray
Subject:
Regional Subjects - West
Subject:
Military - World War II
Subject:
United States - State & Local - Pacific Northwest
Subject:
General Biography
Subject:
Biography - General
Subject:
World War II in Alaska
Subject:
Japanese attack on Aleutian Islands
Subject:
Japanese prisoner of war
Subject:
Aleut, native cultues, native education, World War II, prisoner of war, Japanese Army,
Subject:
Biography, Etta Jones, Alaskan Pioneers, WWII POW s, Attu Island, Alaskan History
Subject:
Native American
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Print PDF
Publication Date:
20091105
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
98 bandw historic photos
Pages:
180
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

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Related Subjects

Biography » General
History and Social Science » Americana » Alaska
History and Social Science » Military » World War II » General
History and Social Science » Pacific Northwest » History
History and Social Science » US History » General
History and Social Science » World History » General

Last Letters from Attu: The True Story of Etta Jones, Alaska Pioneer and Japanese P.O.W. New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$18.99 In Stock
Product details 180 pages Alaska Northwest Books - English 9780882408101 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
In June 1942 the Japanese army invaded Attu, a remote island at the end of the Aleutian Chain. Soldiers occupied the village for two months before taking its Alaska Native residents to Japan, where they were held until the end of the war. After harassing American and Canadian forces for little over a year, the Japanese forces quietly withdrew. After the war, the Attuans' return to Alaska was not a joyful reunion. When they were released, the Attuans were not allowed to return to their home, but were settled instead in Atka, several hundred miles from Attu.and#160;

and#160;

Attu Boy is Nick Golodoffand#8217;s memoir of his experience as a prisoner of war in Japan during World War II as a young boy. Nick was six years old when Japanese soldiers invaded his remote Aleutian village. Along with theand#160; other Unangan Attu residents, Nick and his family were taken to Hokkaido, Japan. Only 25 of the Attuans survived the war; the others died of hunger, malnutrition, and disease. Nick tells his story from the unique viewpoint of a child who experienced friendly relationships with some of the Japanese captors along with harsh treatment from others. Other voices join Nickand#8217;s to give the book a broad sense of the struggles, triumphs, and heartbreak of lives disrupted by war.and#160; and#160;

"Synopsis" by ,
In the quiet of morning, exactly six months after Pearl Harbor, the Japanese touched down on American soil. Landing on the remote Alaska island of Attu, they assailed an entire village, holding the Alaskan villagers for two months and eventually corralling all survivors into a freighter bound for Japan.

One of those survivors, Nick Golodoff, became a prisoner of war at just six years old. He was among the dozens of Unangan Attu residents swept away to Hokkaido, and one of only twenty-five to survive. Attu Boy tells Golodoffand#8217;s story of these harrowing years as he found both friendship and cruelty at the hands of the Japanese. It offers a rare look at the lives of civilian prisoners and their captors in WWII-era Japan. It also tells of Golodoffand#8217;s bittersweet return to a homeland torn apart by occupation and forced internments. Interwoven with other voices from Attu, this richly illustrated memoir is a testament to the struggles, triumphs, and heartbreak of lives disrupted by war.

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