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1 Burnside Environmental Studies- Food and Famine

Genetically Engineered Food: Changing the Nature of Nature: What You Need to Know to Protect Yourself, Your Family, and Our Planet

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Genetically Engineered Food: Changing the Nature of Nature: What You Need to Know to Protect Yourself, Your Family, and Our Planet Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:


•The book that takes a comprehensive look at the threat to our food supply from genetic engineering.

•15,000 copies sold in the first six months.

•Includes new studies about the dangers of genetically engineered food.

•Refutes the andquot;feed the poorandquot; propaganda spread by agribusinesses.

•Is both an expose and educational primer on this controversial technology that is already a part of every American's diet.

•Explains the dangers of these foods to ourselves and our environment in easily understood terms.


Picture a world?
•Where the french fries you eat are registered as a pesticide, not a food."
•Where vegetarians unwittingly consume fish genes in their tomatoes."
•Where corn plants kill monarch butterflies."
•Where soy plants thrive on doses of herbicide that kill every other plant in sight."
•Where multinational corporations own the life forms that farmers grow and legally control the farmers' actions."

That world exists
These things are all happening, and they are happening to you.

Genetically engineered foods--plants whose genetic structures are altered by scientists in ways that could never occur in nature--are already present in many of the products you buy in supermarkets, unlabeled, unwanted, and largely untested. The threat of these organisms to human and environmental health has caused them to be virtually banned in Europe, yet the U.S. government, working hand-in-hand with a few biotech corporations, has actively encouraged their use while discouraging labeling that might alert consumers to what they are eating. The authors show what the future holds and give you the information you need to preserve the independence and integrity of our food supply.

What can you do?
First, inform yourself.
Genetically Engineered Food: Changing the Nature of Natureis the first book to take a comprehensive look at the many ramifications of this disturbing trend."

Authors Martin Teitel and Kimberly Wilson explain what genetic engineering is and how it works, then explore the health risks involved with eating organisms never before seen in nature. They address the ecological catastrophe that could result from these modified plants crossing with wild species and escaping human control altogether, as well as the economic devastation that may befall small farmers who find themselves at the mercy of mega-corporations for their livelihood. Taking the discussion a step further, they consider the ethical and spiritual implications of this radical change in our relationship to the natural world, showing what the future holds and giving you the information you need to act on your own or to join others in preserving the independence and integrity of our food supply.

Book News Annotation:

According to this primer for non-scientists, there are three basic problems of biotech food: future uncertainties, owning food, or more exactly, seeds; and the globalization of monoculture. Topics include how genetic engineering works; who wins and who loses because of the biotech industry; risks to health, environment, and the economy; ethical aspects; genetic engineering's claim to end starvation; and finally, making "informed choices" (or better, informed refusals) regarding—what this book might whisper between its lines—"frankenfood." Teitel is president of the Council for Responsible Genetics, and Wilson works with the Greenpeace Genetic Engineering Campaign.
Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

What People are Saying About GE Food

"Martin Teitel and Kimberly Wilson have cut through all the hype and misconceptions surrounding genetically engineered food and provided the indispensable primer for every family in America concerned with making wise dietary choices in the biotech century. Finally, we have available a guide to biotech food issues that is informed, intelligent, and chock-full of common sense. I urge every consumer to read this book before walking into a supermarket again. It will open up your eyes, change what you put in your mouth, and transform your thinking about food forever."
Jeremy Rifkin, author of The Biotech Century

"By far the most accessible and informative publication on genetic engineering in food production that I have read to date.It is written so that the non-scientist can fully understand the scope of this technology, with numerous footnotes and references that are a handy resource guide for those seeking more knowledge. An excellent book."
Katherine DiMatteo, Executive Director, Organic Trade Association

"For consumers who wish to understand why their food has been genetically altered--without their consent, with virtually no testing, and without labeling--Teitel and Wilson's timely book is essential reading.It tells us who the winners and losers are in this global experiment with the world's food supply."
Sheldon Krimsky, author of Agricultural Biotechnology and the Environment

"As bioengineered crops cover ever more millions of acres, the likelihood of side effects and unintended consequences looms larger.Farmers will realize they were not told enough of the truth.And consumers will see there is no escape other than to fight back and demand an open scientific process and response to persistent questions and miscues, with the burden of proof right on the companies and their accomplices. All this and more is why Genetically Engineered Food: Changing the Nature of Natureis so valuable for enlightening the public."
From the foreword by Ralph Nader

"We simply do not know the long-term consequences for human health and the wider environment of releasing plants bred in this way?The lesson of BSE [mad cow disease] and other entirely man-made disasters on the road to 'cheap food' is surely that it is the unforseen consequences which present the greatest cause for concern. Even the best science cannot predict the unpredictable."
H.R.H. the Prince of Wales, June 8, 1998

"There are certainly more and more questions being asked about biotechnology, and those questions must be answered. They cannot be brushed off. They must be dealt with. Otherwise, what will happen is that the consuming public, both here and abroad, will begin to believe that there are problems with it."
USDA Chief Dan Glickman, June 6, 1999

GE Food in the News

"In Britain, Arpad Pusztai, a professor at the Rowett Research Institute in Aberdeen, reported in April that an experiment in which laboratory rats were fed genetically modified potatoes had caused weakened immune systems and damage to vital organs."
The Toronto Globe and Mail, February 20, 1999

"The world's two largest food production companies have decided they no longer will accept genetically modified ingredients for products sold in Europe."
Natural Foods Merchandiser, July 1999

"University of Chicago researchers are concerned that genetically engineered crops could cross-breed with weeds, creating 'super weeds' that have genes making them immune to Roundup or other chemicals."
The Boston Globe, July 11, 1999

"The popcorn at your movie house could be made from plants designed to fight off a voracious pest called the corn borer. Your baby's formula could come from soybean plants biologically transformed to withstand the herbicide Roundup. The bags of potato chips on your grocer's shelves could be sliced from spuds containing a gene that poisons Colorado potato beetles."
The San Francisco Examiner, July 11, 1999

"The Rockefeller Foundation, which funds research to help poor farmers in developing countries, asked Monsanto Co. to swear off use of the 'terminator gene,' which would make seed sterile."
The Wall Street Journal, June 28, 1999

"At some cost and considerable inconvenience, Gerber is dropping some of its existing corn and soybean suppliers in favor of ones that can produce crops that aren't genetically altered."
The Wall Street Journal, July 30, 1999

"The science journal Naturepublished a Cornell University study showing that almost half the monarch butterflies who fed on the pollen from Bt corn died."
The Boston Globe, July 11, 1999

Synopsis:

This revised and updated second edition is both an expos? and educational primer on this controversial technology that is already a part of every American's diet.

Description:

Includes bibliographical references and index.

About the Author

Martin Teitel, Ph.D., the author of Rain Forest in Your Kitchen, is Executive Director of the Council for Responsible Genetics. He lives in Boston. Kimberly A. Wilson, former director of the council's program on Commercial Biotechnology and the Environment, works with the Greenpeace biotechnology campaign and lives in San Francisco.

Visit the Council for Responsible Genetics's web site at <>.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgements Foreword Introduction: Hijacked Dinner 1. How Genetic Engineering Works 2. What's in Your Grocery Cart? 3. You Are What You Eat 4. Your Right to Know 5. Food Fights 6. Fields of Green: Farming and Biotech 7. Crossing Swords with an Angel 8. "We Will Feed the World" 9. What the Future Holds 10. The Light at the End of the Tunnel: What You Can Do Appendix A: Organic Seed Saving Appendix B: Related Web Sites Appendix C: Organizations Notes Suggested Reading Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9780892819485
Foreword:
Nadar, Ralph
Author:
Wilson, Kimberly A.
Author:
Martin Teitel, Ph.D.
Author:
Teitel, Martin
Author:
Nader, Ralph
Author:
Teitel, Ph.D., Martin
Author:
Teitel, PH. D.
Author:
Nadar, Ralph
Publisher:
Park Street Press
Location:
Rochester Vt.
Subject:
General
Subject:
Health - Nutrition
Subject:
Nutrition
Subject:
Food Science
Subject:
Food
Subject:
Genetics
Subject:
Safety
Subject:
Crops
Subject:
Agricultural biotechnology
Subject:
Life Sciences - Genetics & Genomics
Subject:
Crops -- Genetic engineering.
Subject:
Sports and Fitness-Medicine Nutrition and Psychology
Copyright:
Edition Number:
2
Edition Description:
Second Edition
Series Volume:
report no. 260
Publication Date:
20010431
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Yes
Pages:
208
Dimensions:
9.08x6.02x.59 in. .70 lbs.

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Related Subjects

Cooking and Food » Diet and Nutrition » General
Cooking and Food » Diet and Nutrition » Nutrition
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » Nutrition
Reference » Science Reference » Technology
Science and Mathematics » Agriculture » General
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Sports and Outdoors » Sports and Fitness » Medicine Nutrition and Psychology

Genetically Engineered Food: Changing the Nature of Nature: What You Need to Know to Protect Yourself, Your Family, and Our Planet Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$6.50 In Stock
Product details 208 pages Park Street Press - English 9780892819485 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , What People are Saying About GE Food

"Martin Teitel and Kimberly Wilson have cut through all the hype and misconceptions surrounding genetically engineered food and provided the indispensable primer for every family in America concerned with making wise dietary choices in the biotech century. Finally, we have available a guide to biotech food issues that is informed, intelligent, and chock-full of common sense. I urge every consumer to read this book before walking into a supermarket again. It will open up your eyes, change what you put in your mouth, and transform your thinking about food forever."
Jeremy Rifkin, author of The Biotech Century

"By far the most accessible and informative publication on genetic engineering in food production that I have read to date.It is written so that the non-scientist can fully understand the scope of this technology, with numerous footnotes and references that are a handy resource guide for those seeking more knowledge. An excellent book."
Katherine DiMatteo, Executive Director, Organic Trade Association

"For consumers who wish to understand why their food has been genetically altered--without their consent, with virtually no testing, and without labeling--Teitel and Wilson's timely book is essential reading.It tells us who the winners and losers are in this global experiment with the world's food supply."
Sheldon Krimsky, author of Agricultural Biotechnology and the Environment

"As bioengineered crops cover ever more millions of acres, the likelihood of side effects and unintended consequences looms larger.Farmers will realize they were not told enough of the truth.And consumers will see there is no escape other than to fight back and demand an open scientific process and response to persistent questions and miscues, with the burden of proof right on the companies and their accomplices. All this and more is why Genetically Engineered Food: Changing the Nature of Natureis so valuable for enlightening the public."
From the foreword by Ralph Nader

"We simply do not know the long-term consequences for human health and the wider environment of releasing plants bred in this way?The lesson of BSE [mad cow disease] and other entirely man-made disasters on the road to 'cheap food' is surely that it is the unforseen consequences which present the greatest cause for concern. Even the best science cannot predict the unpredictable."
H.R.H. the Prince of Wales, June 8, 1998

"There are certainly more and more questions being asked about biotechnology, and those questions must be answered. They cannot be brushed off. They must be dealt with. Otherwise, what will happen is that the consuming public, both here and abroad, will begin to believe that there are problems with it."
USDA Chief Dan Glickman, June 6, 1999

GE Food in the News

"In Britain, Arpad Pusztai, a professor at the Rowett Research Institute in Aberdeen, reported in April that an experiment in which laboratory rats were fed genetically modified potatoes had caused weakened immune systems and damage to vital organs."
The Toronto Globe and Mail, February 20, 1999

"The world's two largest food production companies have decided they no longer will accept genetically modified ingredients for products sold in Europe."
Natural Foods Merchandiser, July 1999

"University of Chicago researchers are concerned that genetically engineered crops could cross-breed with weeds, creating 'super weeds' that have genes making them immune to Roundup or other chemicals."
The Boston Globe, July 11, 1999

"The popcorn at your movie house could be made from plants designed to fight off a voracious pest called the corn borer. Your baby's formula could come from soybean plants biologically transformed to withstand the herbicide Roundup. The bags of potato chips on your grocer's shelves could be sliced from spuds containing a gene that poisons Colorado potato beetles."
The San Francisco Examiner, July 11, 1999

"The Rockefeller Foundation, which funds research to help poor farmers in developing countries, asked Monsanto Co. to swear off use of the 'terminator gene,' which would make seed sterile."
The Wall Street Journal, June 28, 1999

"At some cost and considerable inconvenience, Gerber is dropping some of its existing corn and soybean suppliers in favor of ones that can produce crops that aren't genetically altered."
The Wall Street Journal, July 30, 1999

"The science journal Naturepublished a Cornell University study showing that almost half the monarch butterflies who fed on the pollen from Bt corn died."
The Boston Globe, July 11, 1999

"Synopsis" by , This revised and updated second edition is both an expos? and educational primer on this controversial technology that is already a part of every American's diet.
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