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Nijar Country

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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

"No one can deny that Juan Goytisolo is the main Spanish novelist on active service."—Carlos Fuentes

"Juan Goytisolo is one of the most rigorous and original contemporary writers."—Mario Vargas Llosa

"One of the most brilliant of living writers."—Los Angeles Times

Seemingly an intimate travel book, Juan Goytisolos short narrative grimly revisits Almería under Francos rule. His earlier visits allow him to compare his “chosen homeland” to a past time and a fundamentally unchanged zone, neglected by Franco and Spain itself. At once, then, Níjar Country doubles time and space, the first of its many such doublings.

Walls graffitied FRANCO, FRANCO, FRANCO preside over destitution, hopeless hopes, and labored lives ended before death, so inhabitants dream of escaping, some having returned only to recall cities regretfully. One boy, pointedly named Juan, implores the narrator (our Juan?) to take him away. The boy may embody a past Juan of whom the present man is avatar—and what about the other Juans in the book?

Readers of Goytisolos later books, such as Juan the Landless, may be surprised by Níjar Country's precociously complex counterpoint, so deftly manipulated as to possibly escape detection.

Goytisolo has written other “travelogs,” each accomplishing multiple purposes. Here his vocabulary and grammar sound Níjars soulful culture. Peter Bushs flexible translation admirably hurdles such potential obstacles of diction and expression.

Synopsis:

Seemingly an intimate travelog, Níjar County actually scrutinizes Francos rural society, precipitating Goytisolos designation as persona non grata.

Synopsis:

"Juan Goytisolo is one of the most rigorous and original contemporary writers."—Mario Vargas Llosa

"One of the most brilliant of living writers."—Los Angeles Times

An intimate account of travel in Andalusia during the 1950s, Juan Goytisolo's early, short narrative grimly revisits the province of Almería, still under Franco's rule. The critic Ramón Fernández Palmeral writes: "More than a mere travelog, Goytisolo bravely chose to report the social and economic life in the Almería of those Franquista years." He adds: "Brave, most of all, because by publishing it, even at first in France, Goytisolo risked being sent to jail."

To this day, the Andalusian tourist bureau highly recommends Níjar Country for its keenness and accuracy of observation—human, botanical, linguistic, geographical—so tourists on site and in armchairs may superimpose those still haunting walls graffitied FRANCO, FRANCO, FRANCO on what Níjar Country also indicts as "postcard Spain."

Juan Goytisolo, Spanish novelist and essayist, was born in Barcelona in 1931. He now lives in Marrakech, Morocco. His most famous novels are Marks of Identity (1966), Count Julian (1970), and Juan the Landless (1975), each of which was banned in Spain until after Franco's death.

Synopsis:

Seemingly an intimate travel book, Goytisolo's short narrative scrutinizes Nijar's society and environment. Walls painted FRANCO, FRANCO, FRANCO preside over desiccation, destitution, hopeless hopes, futile lives ended before death. Many dream of escaping to cities but continue living behind postcard scenes, under frivolous headlines. Goytisolo's angry peroration condemns this falsity, for which he was designated persona non grata.

About the Author

Born in Barcelona in 1931, Juan Goytisolo is Spains greatest living writer. A bitter opponent of the Franco regime, his early novels were banned in fascist Spain. Publishing Níjar Country in 1954, he was declared persona non grata. For years, he says, his name was better known in police stations than in Spanish literary circles. In 1956 he moved to Paris where he married Marcel Prousts cousin, the writer Monique Lange. After her death in 1986, Goytisolo settled in Marrakech, where he presently lives.

Peter Bush, the internationally esteemed translator, brings Catalan, French, Portuguese, and Spanish literature into English. Níjar Country is his eleventh translation of a work by Juan Goytisolo. Bush was awarded the Valle-Inclán Prize for Literary Translation for The Marx Family Saga . Bush now makes his home in Barcelona.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780930829438
Author:
Goytisolo, Juan
Publisher:
Lumen Books
Author:
Bush, Peter
Subject:
Continental european
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Edition Description:
Trade Paper
Series:
Helen Lane Editions
Publication Date:
20110431
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
8 B&W photographs, 1 map
Pages:
108
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

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Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
Travel » Travel Writing » Europe
Travel » Travel Writing » General

Nijar Country Used Trade Paper
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Product details 108 pages Lumen Books - English 9780930829438 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
Seemingly an intimate travelog, Níjar County actually scrutinizes Francos rural society, precipitating Goytisolos designation as persona non grata.
"Synopsis" by ,

"Juan Goytisolo is one of the most rigorous and original contemporary writers."—Mario Vargas Llosa

"One of the most brilliant of living writers."—Los Angeles Times

An intimate account of travel in Andalusia during the 1950s, Juan Goytisolo's early, short narrative grimly revisits the province of Almería, still under Franco's rule. The critic Ramón Fernández Palmeral writes: "More than a mere travelog, Goytisolo bravely chose to report the social and economic life in the Almería of those Franquista years." He adds: "Brave, most of all, because by publishing it, even at first in France, Goytisolo risked being sent to jail."

To this day, the Andalusian tourist bureau highly recommends Níjar Country for its keenness and accuracy of observation—human, botanical, linguistic, geographical—so tourists on site and in armchairs may superimpose those still haunting walls graffitied FRANCO, FRANCO, FRANCO on what Níjar Country also indicts as "postcard Spain."

Juan Goytisolo, Spanish novelist and essayist, was born in Barcelona in 1931. He now lives in Marrakech, Morocco. His most famous novels are Marks of Identity (1966), Count Julian (1970), and Juan the Landless (1975), each of which was banned in Spain until after Franco's death.

"Synopsis" by , Seemingly an intimate travel book, Goytisolo's short narrative scrutinizes Nijar's society and environment. Walls painted FRANCO, FRANCO, FRANCO preside over desiccation, destitution, hopeless hopes, futile lives ended before death. Many dream of escaping to cities but continue living behind postcard scenes, under frivolous headlines. Goytisolo's angry peroration condemns this falsity, for which he was designated persona non grata.
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