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    Children and Other Wild Animals

    Brian Doyle 9780870717543

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1 Burnside Archaeology- New World

This title in other editions

Other titles in the Wattis Symposium Series in Anthropology series:

Wattis Symposium Series in Anthropology #27: The First Americans

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Wattis Symposium Series in Anthropology #27: The First Americans Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

As modern humans spread around the globe, the Americas represented the final continental frontier. These first colonists were modern in appearance and technology, but who were they and when did they arrive? Traditional answers to these questions have come under increasing scrutiny in the face of new findings from artifacts, skeletal remains, genes, and languages. The peopling of the Americas has become one of archaeology's most compelling and contentious subjects, as these new lines of evidence reveal a more complex solution. In this volume, distinguished scientists from the fields of archaeology, physical anthropology, paleoecology, genetics, and linguistics assess the latest evidence from Siberia to Chile and offer provocative ideas for how, when, and where humans entered the Americas.

Contributors: Bruce Bradley, Linda Brown, Scott A. Elias, Tom D. Dillehay, John Douglas, Jon M. Erlandson, Nina G. Jablonski, David J. Meltzer, D. Andrew Merriwether, Johanna Nichols, Joseph F. Powell, Anna C. Roosevelt, Jack Rossen, Dennis Stanford, D. Gentry Steele, Christy G. Turner II

Distributed for the California Academy of Sciences

Synopsis:

As modern humans spread around the globe, the Americas represented the final continental frontier. These first colonists were modern in appearance and technology, but who were they and when did they arrive? Traditional answers to these questions have come under increasing scrutiny in the face of new findings from artifacts, skeletal remains, genes, and languages. The peopling of the Americas has become one of archaeology's most compelling and contentious subjects, as these new lines of evidence reveal a more complex solution. In this volume, distinguished scientists from the fields of archaeology, physical anthropology, paleoecology, genetics, and linguistics assess the latest evidence from Siberia to Chile and offer provocative ideas for how, when, and where humans entered the Americas.

Contributors: Bruce Bradley, Linda Brown, Scott A. Elias, Tom D. Dillehay, John Douglas, Jon M. Erlandson, Nina G. Jablonski, David J. Meltzer, D. Andrew Merriwether, Johanna Nichols, Joseph F. Powell, Anna C. Roosevelt, Jack Rossen, Dennis Stanford, D. Gentry Steele, Christy G. Turner II

Distributed for the California Academy of Sciences

Synopsis:

Leading scientists examine current archaeological, genetic, linguistic, and ecological evidence that could answer when, how, and where modern people first colonized the Americas.

About the Author

Nina G. Jablonski is Irvine Chair and Curator of Anthropology at the California Academy of Sciences. She coedited Beyond Art: Pleistocene Image and Symbol (1997) and The Origin and Diversification of Language (1998), California.

Table of Contents

Preface

Acknowledgements

Introduction

Setting the Stage:

Environmental Conditions in Beringia as people entered the New World

Scott A. Elias

What do you do when no one's been there before?

Thoughts on the exploration and colonization of new lands

David J. Meltzer

Anatomically modern humans, maritime voyaging, and the Pleistocene

colonization of the Americas

Jon M. Erlandson

Facing the past:

A view of the North American human fossil record

D. Gentry Steele and Joseph F. Powell

Teeth, needles, dogs and Siberia:

Bioarchaeological evidence for the colonization of the New World

Christy G. Turner II

The migrations and adaptations of the first Americans:

Clovis and pre-Clovis views from South America

A.C. Roosevelt, John Douglas and Linda Brown

Plant food and its implications for the peopling of the New World:

A view from South America

Tom D. Dillehay and Jack Rossen

Ocean trails and prairie paths?

Thoughts about Clovis origins

Dennis Stanford and Bruce Bradley

The first American languages

Johanna Nichols

A Mitochondrial perspective on the peopling of the New World

D. Andrew Merriwether

Product Details

ISBN:
9780940228498
Subtitle:
The Pleistocene Colonization of the New World
Editor:
Jablonski, Nina G.
Editor:
Jablonski, Nina G.
Author:
Jablonski, Nina G.
Publisher:
University of California Press
Subject:
Archaeology
Subject:
North American
Subject:
Antiquities
Subject:
Indians
Subject:
Paleo-Indians.
Subject:
America - Discovery and exploration - Pre-
Subject:
Native American-General Native American Studies
Edition Description:
Trade Paper
Series:
Wattis Symposium Series in Anthropology
Series Volume:
27
Publication Date:
20020627
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
Professional and scholarly
Language:
English
Illustrations:
1 color illustration, 34 b/w illustratio
Pages:
343
Dimensions:
10.26x7.18x.84 in. 1.98 lbs.

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Archaeology » New World

Wattis Symposium Series in Anthropology #27: The First Americans Used Hardcover
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$30.00 In Stock
Product details 343 pages University of California Press - English 9780940228498 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , As modern humans spread around the globe, the Americas represented the final continental frontier. These first colonists were modern in appearance and technology, but who were they and when did they arrive? Traditional answers to these questions have come under increasing scrutiny in the face of new findings from artifacts, skeletal remains, genes, and languages. The peopling of the Americas has become one of archaeology's most compelling and contentious subjects, as these new lines of evidence reveal a more complex solution. In this volume, distinguished scientists from the fields of archaeology, physical anthropology, paleoecology, genetics, and linguistics assess the latest evidence from Siberia to Chile and offer provocative ideas for how, when, and where humans entered the Americas.

Contributors: Bruce Bradley, Linda Brown, Scott A. Elias, Tom D. Dillehay, John Douglas, Jon M. Erlandson, Nina G. Jablonski, David J. Meltzer, D. Andrew Merriwether, Johanna Nichols, Joseph F. Powell, Anna C. Roosevelt, Jack Rossen, Dennis Stanford, D. Gentry Steele, Christy G. Turner II

Distributed for the California Academy of Sciences

"Synopsis" by , Leading scientists examine current archaeological, genetic, linguistic, and ecological evidence that could answer when, how, and where modern people first colonized the Americas.
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