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Of Walking in Rain

by

Of Walking in Rain Cover

ISBN13: 9780974436470
ISBN10: 097443647x
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Awards

Staff Pick

Of Walking in Rain is the latest literary output from the one-man stone Oregon publishing empire that is Matt Love. His devotion to and celebration of all things Beaver State is often infectious (and perhaps ought to be classified as a contagion). His newest work, a stylistic torrent, is a paean to Oregon's "most famous cultural asset" — rain. As he's wont to do in nearly all of his books, Love, amidst the deluge of rain-related reflections, recollections, and rants, offers a veritable flood of opinions on politicians, education and teaching, football, and sex, incorporating no shortage of literary and lyrical allusions to his favorite singers, songs, and scribes (especially Ken Kesey).
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Nestucca Spit Press announces the release of Of Walking in Rain, by Matt Love, who calculates that 1.5 tons of rain have fallen on him during his 16 years living on the Oregon Coast.

In October 2012, as the longest summer drought in recorded Oregon history finally gave way to the rainy season, author Matt Love decided to write a book in real time reflecting upon the state's most famous cultural asset and what it means to live in one the rainiest places on earth. "When this project began, I had no idea where it was going. Rain is like that. I did, however, have the modest ambition to write the greatest book on rain in the history of Oregon literature," said Love. Three months later, Love produced a unique volume about rain that has very little to do with weather and everything to do with life.

In the book, Love writes:

I want to be the Tom Petty, Henry Miller, Harriet Tubman, Steve Prefontaine, Gale Sayers and Daniel of the lion's den of Oregon rain. Rain plays chess and solitaire with you at the same time. Rain sets up spontaneous stages for unrehearsed performances. Rain brings mountains down to the sea. All my great notions manifest in rain. Threat of rain culls the weaklings. Rain strops those who walk into it. I have divined many of life's most important intentions in rain. Using an umbrella is like turning off the light before sex. What would happen to our country if we elected a President from the Oregon Coast who knew rain and loved it? I love the smell of wet dogs in the morning — it smells like victory. I'd rather fall in love with a woman of rain, not the sun or moon, but of course, rain isn't for everyone as I have discovered. Rain portends nothing. It means everything.

Of Walking in Rain is a 190-page work of creative non-fiction that assays the ubiquitous subject of rain in Oregon in as many ways as rain falls in Oregon. It was written during the four wettest months of the second rainiest year in Newport history. The book blends an eclectic variety of literary genres, including memoir, essay, vignette, diary, reportage, guide, criticism, satire, stream of consciousness, homework, meditation, review, commentary, oral history, weather report, discography, liner notes, polemic, curriculum and confession. Of Walking in Rain also features the exquisite etchings of rain by renowned artist Frank Boyden. The book was printed by Pioneer Printing in Newport and is distributed exclusively through Nestucca Spit Press' web site, independent bookstores and at live events.

About the Author

Matt Love is the author/editor of ten books about Oregon, including, the best selling Far Out Story of Vortex I, Citadel of the Spirit: Oregon's Sesquicentennial Anthology, Gimme Refuge: The Education of a Caretaker and The Newport Trilogy. In 2009, Love won the Oregon Literary Arts' Stewart H. Holbrook Literary Legacy Award for his contributions to Oregon history and literature. He lives in South Beach and teaches creative writing and journalism at Newport High School.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 27 comments:

Chelsea Lancaster, July 28, 2014 (view all comments by Chelsea Lancaster)
Often times, as a reader, I find myself 100-pages deep in mediocre writing. Uninspired storytelling. Forgettable form. Pedestrian word-play. It's an occupational hazard, really. Fortunately, Sometimes a Great Book comes along bringing with it profound implications for our future selves. We, as readers, live for these books. We feel changed, our perspective is altered, and we begin seeing the world in a new creative light. Other, more rare times, an exceptional book finds its way to you, and these books not only change you, they become you. Yes, every once in a great while you can find a book that you recognize as a small neatly packaged piece of yourself. As you turn the pages, you pick up a fragment here, a snippet there, and with almost no effort at all you've generated a complete picture of yourself. I believe it is the goal of every writer to solicit this response in their readers, but in my experience, few have succeeded in doing so.

Of Walking in Rain, by Oregon author Matt Love is one of those exceptional books. Written in a creative free-form compiled of real time journal entries, short stories, poems, and excerpts of related works, Love takes you on a journey straight to the heart of Oregon Rain. Having lived, written, and taught in Oregon most of his life, he writes with a genuine and unpretentious authority. “How can you truly write about rain unless you've experienced it's quintessence? That would be here, where I live,” he writes.

Since Love writes in fluid free-flowing real time, we are able to share in his thought process as it happens. He frequently asks himself, “is that the point of this book?” inviting the reader in as a participant, rather than an onlooker. He's not narrating a story, he's guiding an existential journey into Rain, and upon reading his final line, “I let her in. I tasted her rain,” I realized that his journey had become my journey. I flipped backwards through the pages searching for the specific passage where this transition occurred, but pinned down nothing. I think that's the point.

The bottom line is twofold: (a) Rain is, at its very core, hard, uneven, inherent truth. Sometimes it trickles. Sometimes it pours. Sometimes it comes in a gentle mist, other times an overbearing downpour. You could literally replace “rain” with “truth” in any given passage and the message remains the same. For example:

“Truth sends roots deep.”

“Truth is the ultimate in evolution and revolution.”

“What would happen to our country if we elected a president from the Oregon Coast who knew truth and loved it?”

(b) Only those unafraid of being weathered by truth will venture, unprotected, into rain. Love writes

“I didn't stay locked up in my room after she found another and disappeared. I ventured outside to explore rain and confront the serrated truth about myself while she traveled first class to where the sun always shines and foreign capital enslaves locals and monkeys to exploit the sun for profit and banal New Age insights...I suffered an almost debilitating emotional crisis but decided to stand up and walk right into rain in hope of discovering a secret passage through misery. I found it. I embraced rain and let it transfigure me.”

Rain absolves you, cleanses you, prepares you to accept the answers to the questions that you've been too scared to ask. If you think that an umbrella can shield you from the ferocity of these truths, then you are no where near ready for this book or the internal journey that it offers. I advise that you throw away your umbrella, and run naked into your nearest rainstorm. Then we can talk. As Love says, “Anyone can join this country, the Rainlands (Truthlands), if you just cross the boundary-less boarder, which resembles a billowing curtain of gray wool and not a chain link fence with razorwire.”
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Christi Crutchfield, June 29, 2014 (view all comments by Christi Crutchfield)
This little gem of a book is an excellent meditation on the ecstasy and sensuality of that often underappreciated liquid: rain. Author, Matt Love, who has resided for many years on the Oregon Coast recorded his experiences and reflections about rain for three months, October through December, that are traditionally the coast’s rainiest months. He employs Ken Kesey’s Sometimes a Great Notion as a jumping off point, a novel that mentions rain 500-1,000 times, and Love opens with his favorite Great Notion quote: “Give me a dark smeary shiny night full of rain. That’s when the fear starts. That’s when you sell the juice.”

What follows is all juice. The diary entries are filled with entertaining and sometimes obscure references to rain in music, literature, poetry, art, pop culture, movies, and history. Throughout the book, the author is either venturing out on the stormy beaches with his sweet sidekick Sonny the Husky meeting glistening Rain Shamans along the way or encouraging his hoodied students at the high school where he teaches to contemplate the essence of rain through poetry and photography. All of these pluvial explorations past and present are tapped out (to the rhythm of rain drops) on a thrift store portable Italian typewriter by the author who then raises a shot glass of sacramental rain to the liquid sky: to rain!

Here are a few of my favorite rain lines by Love that flowed along the page like the cataloguing of a Walt Whitman poem:

“Rain is wanton, exciting, the sun constant, boring. Rain gallivants, the sun merely beams. Rain inebriates, the sun makes you drowsy. The rain ruins guns, the sun keeps powder dry.”

And later…

“You can slide in rain. You can smear rain, but never touch the sun. Rain sluices gold. Rain foments serenity. Rain launches sedition against conformity.”

By the end of the book, this reader was ready to ditch the umbrella, make a run to the stormy coast the next time it pours, and learn to love rain more in the process. And maybe if she was lucky she’d get a glimpse of a rain shaman braiding her long, seaweedy hair on the shore or the shimmery rainbody of Sonny the Husky gallivanting along the wet sand.
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(1 of 2 readers found this comment helpful)
SM96, May 11, 2014 (view all comments by SM96)
Matt's book, 'Of Walking in Rain' provided me with a guidebook to fall in love with rain all over again. It makes me want to sprint outside the very next time I hear the sound of rain begin to smack against the ground. To completely absorb the rain. So much so that once my clothes were completely saturated, remove them and then truly get as close to rain as possible. Allowing the deluge to drench me as it pounds against my skin.
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(2 of 4 readers found this comment helpful)
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780974436470
Author:
Love, Matt
Publisher:
NESTUCCA SPIT PRESS
Binding:
TRADE PAPER

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Related Subjects

Featured Titles » Arts
Featured Titles » General
History and Social Science » Pacific Northwest » History
History and Social Science » Pacific Northwest » Literature Folklore and Memoirs
History and Social Science » Pacific Northwest » Oregon » Books About Oregon
History and Social Science » Pacific Northwest » Oregon » Coast

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Product details pages NESTUCCA SPIT PRESS - English 9780974436470 Reviews:
"Staff Pick" by ,

Of Walking in Rain is the latest literary output from the one-man stone Oregon publishing empire that is Matt Love. His devotion to and celebration of all things Beaver State is often infectious (and perhaps ought to be classified as a contagion). His newest work, a stylistic torrent, is a paean to Oregon's "most famous cultural asset" — rain. As he's wont to do in nearly all of his books, Love, amidst the deluge of rain-related reflections, recollections, and rants, offers a veritable flood of opinions on politicians, education and teaching, football, and sex, incorporating no shortage of literary and lyrical allusions to his favorite singers, songs, and scribes (especially Ken Kesey).

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