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Peace Medals: Negotiating Power in Early America

Peace Medals: Negotiating Power in Early America Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

“Peace and Friendship.” This noble phrase, emblazoned on the back of silver peace medals given by American presidents to chiefs of important tribes in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, is also a glorified representation of the real interactions between the American or European governments and Native American tribes. Peace Medals: Negotiating Power in Early America presents stories of people and events behind the medals, offering insight into the symbolic value of medals from colonial and tribal perspectives spanning several generations up to the present day.

The peace medals themselves are beautiful examples of medallic artistry, but their real importance is in their historical significance. Consisting of eight articles written from a multidisciplinary approach, Peace Medals focuses on the history and significance of the medals, the traditions they represent, and the individuals involved.

The contributors, including numismatic historians, anthropologists, archaeologists, and museum curators, explore how the American government used the medals in negotiations with powerful chiefs to secure trading partnerships and political allegiance against European colonial powers, and also discusses British, French, and Spanish medals as part of European negotiating strategies to create Indian allies on the American continent. The origin of peace medals and their synchrony with tribal traditions demonstrate how these high-status emblems evolved, while an examination of medals in a contemporary context reveals their continuing historical importance.

Peace Medals is richly illustrated with paintings and historical photographs that depict rarely seen images of British, French, and Spanish medals in addition to a selection of American medals. Taken together, the articles provide an expansive view of medallic artistry from the eighteenth to the twentieth century and offer new insights into their history. Most of the images are from the extraordinary collections of the Gilcrease Museum.

Book News Annotation:

This volume accompanies an exhibition, Peace Medals: Symbols of Influence and Prestige, which draws on the art and archival collections of the Gilcrease Museum in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Pickering (academic affairs and publications, Gilcrease Museum, and museum science and management, U. of Tulsa) presents photos and paintings from the collection, along with essays on the history and significance of silver peace medals and shell gorgets given by American presidents to chiefs of important Native American tribes in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, the traditions they represent, and the individuals involved. A group of US historians, anthropologists, archaeologists, and museum curators explores how the US government used the medals in negotiations with chiefs to secure trading partnerships and political allegiance against European colonial powers, and British, French, and Spanish medals used in negotiation to create Indian allies on the US continent. Distributed by the U. of Oklahoma Press. Annotation ©2012 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

“Peace and Friendship.” This noble phrase, emblazoned on the back of silver peace medals given by American presidents to chiefs of important tribes in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, is also a glorified representation of the real interactions between the American or European governments and Native American tribes. Peace Medals: Negotiating Power in Early America presents stories of people and events behind the medals, offering insight into the symbolic value of medals from colonial and tribal perspectives spanning several generations up to the present day. The peace medals themselves are beautiful examples of medallic artistry, but their real importance is in their historical significance. Consisting of eight articles written from a multidisciplinary approach, Peace Medals focuses on the history and significance of the medals, the traditions they represent, and the individuals involved.

About the Author

Frank H. Goodyear III is Associate Curator of Photographs at the National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, and author of Zaida Ben-Yusuf: New York Portrait Photographer and Red Cloud: Photographs of a Lakota Chief.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780981979946
Publisher:
Gilcrease Museum
Edition Description:
Hardcover
Author:
Adams, John W.
Author:
Fuld, George
Author:
Arnold, Bruce W.
Author:
King, Duane H.
Author:
Goodyear, Frank H.
Author:
Liechty, Skyler
Author:
Tayman, Barry D.
Author:
Pickering, Robert B.
Author:
Lopez, Tony
Author:
Reilly, F. Kent
Publication Date:
20120131
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
54 color and 17 bandw illus.
Pages:
128
Dimensions:
10 x 9 in

Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Art » Collections, Catalogs, Exhibitions » Permanent Collections
Arts and Entertainment » Art » General
History and Social Science » Native American » General Native American Studies
History and Social Science » Native American » Pacific Northwest
History and Social Science » US History » General

Peace Medals: Negotiating Power in Early America
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Product details 128 pages Gilcrease Museum - English 9780981979946 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
“Peace and Friendship.” This noble phrase, emblazoned on the back of silver peace medals given by American presidents to chiefs of important tribes in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, is also a glorified representation of the real interactions between the American or European governments and Native American tribes. Peace Medals: Negotiating Power in Early America presents stories of people and events behind the medals, offering insight into the symbolic value of medals from colonial and tribal perspectives spanning several generations up to the present day. The peace medals themselves are beautiful examples of medallic artistry, but their real importance is in their historical significance. Consisting of eight articles written from a multidisciplinary approach, Peace Medals focuses on the history and significance of the medals, the traditions they represent, and the individuals involved.

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